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Full text of "Catalogue and announcements for .."

"LI B RARY 

OF THE 

UNIVERSITY 

Of ILLINOIS 

c 

CTGctuZhu 
12)18/ 19- 

i9ss/3Q I 



Series, 1918 Whole Number 301 

No. 1 



'*/U 



THE 

JOHNS HOPKINS 
UNIVERSITY CIRCULAR 



SCHOOL OF HYGIENE AND 
PUBLIC HEALTH 

PRELIMINARY ANNOUNCEMENT 



f 



^ * < 



Baltimore, Maryland ^t 

Published by the University ^» 
Issued Monthly from: October to July 
January, 1918 



Entered, October 21, 1903, at Baltimore, Md., as second class matter, under 
Act of Congress of July 16, 1894 



THE 

JOHNS HOPKINS UNIVERSITY 

SCHOOL OF HYGIENE AND 
PUBLIC HEALTH 

PRELIMINARY ANNOUNCEMENT 




BALTIMORE 

The Johns Hopkins Press 

January, 1918 



FACULTY * 



FRANK JOHNSON GOODNOW, LL. D. 
President of the University 

A. B., Amherst College, 1879, and A. M., 1887 ; LL. B., Columbia University, 
1882 ; LL. D., Amherst College, 1898, Columbia University, 1904, Harvard 
University, 1909 ; Brown University, 1914, Princeton, 1917 ; Professor of Ad- 
ministrative Law, Columbia University, 1887-1914 ; Legal Adviser to the 
Chinese Government, 1913-14. 6 w Madison St. 

WILLIAM HENRY WELCH, M. D., LL. D. 

Director and Head of the Department of Bacteriology and 
Immunology 

A. B., Yale University, 1870 ; M. D., Columbia University (College of Physicians 
and Surgeons, N. Y.), 1875; M. D. (Hon.), University of Pennsylvania, 1894; 
LL. D., Western Reserve University, 1894, Yale University, 1896, Harvard Uni- 
versity, 1900, University of Toronto, 1903, Columbia University, 1904, Jeffer- 
son Medical College, 1907, Princeton University, 1910, Washington University, 
1915, and University of Chicago, 1916 ; Professor of Pathological Anatomv 
and General Pathology in the Bellevue Hospital Medical College, N. Y., 
1879-84; Dean of the Medical Faculty, 1889-98; President of the National 
Academy of Sciences, 1913-1917 ; President of the Board of Directors of the 
Rockefeller Institute for Medical Research ; President of the American Associa- 
tion for the Advancement of Science, 1906 ; President of the American Medical 
Association, 1910-1911 ; Member of the American Philosophical Society ; Patholo- 
gist to the Johns Hopkins Hospital, and Baxley Professor of Pathology, 1884-1917. 

807 St. Paul St. 
WILLIAM HENRY HOWELL, Ph.D., M. D., Sc. D., LL. D. 

Assistant Director and Head of the Department of Physiology 

A. B., Johns Hopkins University, 1881, Fellow, 1882-84, and Ph. D., 1884 ; LL. 
D., Trinity College (Conn.), 1901; Sc. D., Yale University, 1911; M. D. (Hon.), 
University of Michigan, 1890, LL. D., 1912 ; LL. D., Washington University, 
1915 ; Assistant in Biology, 1884-85, Associate, 1885-88, and Associate Professor, 
1888-89 ; Lecturer and Professor of Physiology and Histology, University oi 
Michigan, 1889-92 ; Associate Professor of Physiology, Harvard University, 1892- 
93 ; Member of the National Academy of Sciences and of the American Philoso- 
phical Society ; Dean of the Medical Faculty, 1899-1911 ; Professor of Physiology, 
Medical School, 1893-1917. 

232 W. Lanvale St. 

CHARLES JOSEPH TILDEN, S. B., 

Professor of Civil Engineering — in charge of Instruction in 
Sanitary Engineering 

S. B., Harvard University, 1896 ; Instructor in Civil Engineering, Cornell Univer- 
sity, 1903-05; Professor of Engineering Mechanics, University of Michigan, 
1911-13 ; Member, American Society of Civil Engineers. 

143 W. Lanvale St. 



* The names are arranged in order of appointment. No appointments have been 
made as yet in the departments of Protozoology, Epidemiology, Public Health 
Administration, and some other subjects. A complete list of the teaching staff 
will be issued later. 

3 



4 School of Hygiene and Public Health 

ELMER VERNER McCOLLUM, Ph.D., 

Head of the Department of Chemistry 

A. B„ University of Kansas, 1903, and A. M., 1904 ; Ph. D., Yale University, 
1906 ; Instructor, Assistant Professor, Associate Professor, and Professor of 
Agricultural Chemistry, University of Wisconsin, 1907-1917. 

Talbot Rd., Windsor Hills. 

RAYMOND PEARL, Ph.D., 

Head of the Department of Biometry and Vital Statistics 

A. B., Dartmouth College, 1899 ; Ph. D., University of Michigan, 1902 ; Instructor 
in Zoology in the University of Michigan, 1902-1906 ; in the University of 
Pennsylvania, 1906-1907 ; Biologist of the Maine Agricultural Experiment 
Station, 1907-17 ; Chief of the Statistical Division of the United States Food 
Administration, 1917-1918 ; Member of the National Academy of Sciences and 
of the American Philosophical Society. 

United States Food Administration, Washington, D. C. 

WILLIAM WEBBER FORD, M. D., D. P. H. 
Associate Professor of Bacteriology 

A. B., Adelbert College, 1893 ; M. D., Johns Hopkins University, 1898 ; Instructor 
Associate, and Associate Professor of Bacteriology, 1904-1910 ; Associate Pro 
fessor of Bacteriology and Hygiene, 1910-1917 ; D. P. H., McGill University 
1900 and Fellow in Pathology, 1899-1901 ; Resident House Officer, Johns Hop 
kins Hospital, 1898-99 ; Fellow, Rockefeller Institute for Medical Research 
1901-02 ; Institute for Infectious Diseases, Berlin, 1901-1902, and Johns Hopkin: 
University, 1902-1903 ; Hygienic Institute, University of Vienna, 1912-1913 
Lecturer on Hygiene and Legal Medicine, Johns Hopkins Medical School, 1917- 

1027 Cathedral St 
CARROLL GIDEON BULL, M. D., 

Associate Professor of Immunology 

S. B., Peabody College, 1907 ; M. D., University of Nashville, 1909 ; Pathologist 
to Lincoln Memorial Hospital, 1910-1912 ; Assistant, Nelson Morris Institute 
for Medical Research, 1912-1913 ; Assistant and Associate in Pathology and 
Bacteriology, The Rockefeller Institute for Medical Research, 1913-1918. 

The Rockefeller Institute for Medical Research, 

New York, N. Y. 



THE 

JOHNS HOPKINS 

UNIVERSITY CIRCULAR 

New Series, 1918, No. 1 JANUARY, 1918 Whole Number, 301 

SCHOOL OF HYGIENE AND PUBLIC HEALTH 



General Statement 

The need of larger and better opportunities in this coun- 
try for training and investigation in the Science and Art of 
Hygiene and Public Health has long been recognized. With 
the rapid advance in our knowledge of the causes and mode 
of spread of infectious diseases has come a correspondingly 
increased power of prevention which has greatly stimulated 
interest in preventive medicine and has strengthened the de- 
mands for improved standards of public health organization 
and administration. Especially urgent is the need for men 
and women trained to undertake work in this field which al- 
ready offers attractive careers for those properly qualified, and 
will offer opportunities in larger measure as the necessity for 
such training is more widely appreciated. It is a source of 
great gratification to the Johns Hopkins University that it 
is able to announce the opening in October, 1918, of a School 
of Hygiene and Public Health designed to meet the need 
thus briefly indicated. 

In June, 1916, the Eockefeller Foundation of New York 
notified the President of the Johns Hopkins University that 



6 School of Hygiene and Public Health 

the Foundation was prepared "to co-operate with the Uni- 
versity in the establishment of a School of Hygiene and Pub- 
lic Health for the advancement of knowledge and the train- 
ing of investigators, teachers, officials and other workers in 
these fields." 

This offer was accepted by the University, and on June 
12, 1916, the President of the University made the formal 
announcement that the Board of Trustees had authorized the 
establishment of a School of Hygiene and Public Health as 
part of the University. Dr. William H. Welch was appointed 
Director and Dr. William H. Howell was named to assist in 
the work of organization. 

The history of the events leading up to this action is in 
brief as follows: On October 16, 1914, the General Educa- 
tion Board called a conference of leading authorities in public 
health work to consider the general question of the training 
of qualified sanitarians and public health officials. At the 
request of this conference Dr. W. H. Welch and Dr. Wickliffe 
Rose undertook to prepare a plan for an Institute of Public 
Health and ^giene for submission to the General Educa- 
tion Board and the members of the conference. This report 
was made to the General Education Board on May 27, 1915. 
Subsequently, on the instruction of the Board, a committee 
was appointed to determine where such an institution could 
be located most advantageously. Acting upon the informa- 
tion gathered by this committee the Rockefeller Foundation 
decided " largely by reason of the facilities, organization and 
ideals of its Medical School," to establish a School of Hygiene 
and Public Health at the Johns Hopkins University. 

The main objects of the School will be to establish courses 
for the training of qualified persons for public health work, to 
promote investigative work in hygiene and preventive medi- 
cine and provide opportunities for the training of investiga- 
tors in these subjects, and to develop adequate means for the 
dissemination of sound hygienic knowledge. Special and 
mutual advantages are anticipated from the close relationship 



Courses and Degrees 7 

between the School and the International Health Board of 
the Eockefeller Foundation, particularly in field work and 
in the opportunities for investigation and training in tropical 
medicine and the control of special diseases. As outlined at 
present the work of the School will be organized under 
the following divisions: a department of bacteriology, 
serology and immunology; a department of protozoology and 
medical zoology; a department of epidemiology; a depart- 
ment of statistics; a department of chemical hygiene; a de- 
partment of physiological hygiene; a general department in 
charge of field work and administrative methods. Provision 
will be made for practical work in connection with federal, 
state and municipal departments of health and for instruc- 
tion in sanitary engineering, infectious and occupational dis- 
eases and vocational, mental and social hygiene. 

A suitable lot of land has been purchased at the corner 
of Monument and Wolfe Streets, immediately adjacent to 
the grounds of the Medical School and the Johns Hopkins 
Hospital. Plans have been made for the erection of a build- 
ing upon this lot to contain the laboratories, library, museum 
and offices of the School. The School will be opened for in- 
struction in October, 1918, and men and women students will 
be admitted on the same terms. Owing to war conditions it 
will not be possible to complete the new laboratories of the 
School by that date. Arrangements have been made there- 
fore to use temporarily one of the University buildings form- 
erly occupied by the department of Physics. This building 
is situated on the corner of West Monument Street and Lin- 
den Avenue. It has been completely renovated and equipped 
for the work of the School of Hygiene and Public Health. 

Courses and Degrees 

I. Course leading to the degree of Doctor of Public 
Health : 

The purpose of this course is to furnish instruction in 
public health knowledge and methods to those who have a 



8 School of Hygiene and Public Health 

liberal education and a fundamental training in medicine. 
The course will consist of specified work throughout two 
years together with a summer spent in field work in some 
organized public health service. In the first year the speci- 
fied work will comprise courses in the following subjects: 
advanced bacteriology and immunology; the chemical and 
bacteriological analysis of foods, water and sewage; statistical 
methods; sanitary and administrative law; nutritional and 
environmental hygiene; the history of hygiene. In the sec- 
ond year there will be courses in protozoology and medical 
zoology, epidemiology, occupational diseases, infectious dis- 
eases, sanitation and public health organization, sanitary 
engineering, and social and mental hygiene. It is under- 
stood that these requirements may be modified to suit the 
needs or aptitudes of special students. Graduates in this 
course should be prepared to serve as public health officials 
in those important positions in which the health of large 
communities is involved and in which relations must be 
maintained both with the medical profession and the general 
public. The following groups of students will be accepted as 
candidates for this degree : 

a. Graduates of approved medical schools who have had a 

liberal education as evidenced by a degree in arts or 
sciences, or its equivalent. These candidates will be 
required to pursue a two-year's course together with 
one summer of practical work in an organized public 
health service. 

b. Students who have completed satisfactorily three years 

of the course in an approved medical school and who 
have had a liberal education as evidenced by a degree 
in arts or sciences, or its equivalent. It is hoped that 
in the case of these students arrangements can be 
made for a combined course in medicine and in pub- 
lic health of such a character that the student may 
receive his degree in medicine on the completion of 
one year's work, and his degree in public health af- 



Courses and Degrees 9 

ter an additional or fifth year of work in the School 
of Hygiene and Public Health together with a sum- 
mer spent in practical field work. 

A combined course of this character has been arranged for 
students in the Johns Hopkins Medical School. In their 
fourth year these students may fill all of their elective hours 
with subjects taken from the curriculum of the School of 
Hygiene and Public Health. 

. II. Courses leading to the degree of Doctor of Science 
in Hygiene : 

The underlying object in the arrangement of these courses 
is the training of specialists in the various departments of 
public health work. The field is large and varied. In addi- 
tion to general administrative officials and those immediately 
occupied with the protection of the community from epi- 
demics and insanitary conditions, it is obvious that specially 
trained individuals are needed in such matters as school 
hygiene, occupational hygiene, statistical investigations, nutri- 
tional problems, etc., both for the purpose of adding to knowl- 
edge and for giving special services. 

For work of this character previous training in the physi- 
cal and biological sciences is more essential than acquaintance 
with clinical methods and it is proposed therefore in plan- 
ning these courses to base them upon a liberal education and 
adequate preliminary training in physics, chemistry, biology 
and the medical sciences. The courses as given in the School 
will be organized for a period of two years, the equivalent of 
half of one academic year (15 hours a week) being occupied 
with specified work of a basic character and the remainder of 
the time, including an intervening summer, being allotted 
to advanced work in some special department. This latter 
part of the work must include or consist of a special investi- 
gation of some problem the results of which are to be pre- 
sented in the form of a dissertation. 

To be accepted as a candidate for this degree the following 
requirements must be fulfilled : 



10 School of Hygiene and Public Health 

a. A degree in arts or sciences or its equivalent as evi- 

dence of a liberal education. 

b. Certificates of the satisfactory completion of the first 

two years in an approved medical school. The term 
approved medical school is understood to mean one 
in which adequate courses in physics, chemistry and 
biology are required for entrance. 

c. In place of (b) separate certificates will be accepted from 

colleges in good standing of adequate courses in phys- 
ics, chemistry, biology, anatomy, gross and microscopic, 
physiology, physiological chemistry, pathology and 
bacteriology, whether or not the candidate has been 
registered as a medical student. 

After acceptance as candidates the students will be assigned 
for advice and guidance to the head of the department in 
which they will specialize. Rules governing the presenta- 
tion and publication of dissertations, and the oral and written 
examinations of candidates will be published in the catalogue 
of the School of Hygiene and Public Health to be issued sub- 
sequently. 

III. Course leading to the degree of Bachelor of Science 
in Hygiene : 

It is evident that if public health work in this country de- 
velops along the lines followed at present there will soon be 
established in every community an organized service, includ- 
ing laboratory facilities, for the control of the health affairs 
of that community. For such services trained workers should 
be provided who can undertake the necessary routine work 
connected with the chemical and bacteriological examination 
of water, sewage, foods, excretions, blood; the preparation of 
bacteriological and serological material and sanitary inspec- 
tions. It is proposed to establish courses for the training of 
such workers leading to the degree of Bachelor of Science in 
Hygiene. These courses will require two years of combined 



Special Students 11 

work in the Medical School and the School of Hygiene and 
Public Health and will be based upon a liberal education 
and an adequate knowledge of physics, chemistry and biology 
such as can be obtained in two years of a college course. The 
first year's work will consist of courses in physiology, bac- 
teriology, anatomy and histology and the chemical analysis 
of foods, water and sewage. The second year's work will 
consist of courses in advanced bacteriology, immunology, 
medical zoology, statistics, nutritional and personal hygiene 
and sanitary engineering. The requirements for matricu- 
lation in these courses will be as follows: 

a. Certificate of the completion of at least two years of 

work in an approved college. 

b. Certificates of adequate courses in biology, physics and 

chemistry, including organic chemistry. 

By an adequate course is meant in physics one year of col- 
lege work covering approximately 100 hours of laboratory 
and 100 hours of class work; in biology one year of college 
work covering approximately 150 hours of laboratory and 
100 hours of class- work; in chemistry one to two years of 
college work covering approximately 25,0 hours of labo- 
ratory and 120 hours of class work. 

Special Students 

An opportunity to use the facilities of the School will be 
granted to the following groups of special students not regis- 
tered as candidates for a degree : 

1. Public health officers who may wish to take one or more 

lectures or laboratory courses, or engage in the study 
of some special problem. 

2. Other qualified persons who may wish to attend special 

courses or undertake research work and whose quali- 
fications receive the formal approval of the faculty of 
the School. 



12 School of Hygiene and Public Health 

Courses for Social Workers, Nurses and Teachers 

It is the intention of the School to organize a series of 
courses which will be designed especially for the instruc- 
tion of health nurses, social workers and teachers. These 
courses will be of a practical character and those who regis- 
ter for them and pass the examinations will be granted" suit- 
able certificates. The relations of public and personal hygiene 
and of individual sanitation to the welfare of society will re- 
ceive especial consideration. The details concerning these 
courses will be announced later. 



Public Lectures 

In connection with the class courses it is expected that a 
series of lectures, open to the public, will be arranged an- 
nually. The object of these lectures will be to bring before 
interested persons the general facts and points of view of 
modern hygiene, with the hope that in this way the School 
may serve as a center for the distribution of useful knowledge 
in all matters pertaining to sanitation and preventive 
medicine. 

Scholarships 

A certain number of scholarships carrying free tuition 
will be awarded annually by the Trustees of the University 
upon the recommendation of the faculty. These scholarships 
will be awarded for one year, but may be renewed for a sec- 
ond year at the discretion of the faculty. Applications may 
be made to the Director of the School. 

Fellowships 

Six research fellowships carrying each a stipend of $1,000, 
and exemption from all charges for tuition will be awarded 
annually by the Trustees of the University upon the recom- 
mendation of the faculty. The conditions upon which these 
fellowships will be awarded are as follows: 



Announcement of Courses 13 

1. The applicant must have received his doctor's degree in 

medicine, science, philosophy or public health, or fur- 
nish evidence of experience and meritorious service 
in scientific work. 

2. The holder of a fellowship must give his time pri- 

marily to investigative work, approved by some 
member of the staff of the School, and must be in 
residence during the academic year, unless permis- 
sion is granted to him by the faculty to carry on his 
work elsewhere. 

3. The application must be made prior to June 1st, in 

writing, addressed to the Director of the School of 
Hygiene and Public Health. 

Announcement of Courses 

The following courses will be given during the session of 
1918-19 : 

Sanitary and Administrative Law. President F. J. Good- 
now. Three hours weekly during the first semester. 
This course will treat of the origin and development of 
Sanitary Law and of some of the more important prob- 
lems which its administration presents. 

The History of Hygiene and Epidemiology. Dr. W. H. 
Welch. One hour weekly throughout the year. The lec- 
tures will consider the development of Hygiene and 
Epidemiology, especially from the historical point of 
view, and the lines of future growth. 

Advanced Bacteriology. This course will be given under 
the direction of Dr. W. W. Ford, Associate Professor of 
Bacteriology. It will consist of nine hours of laboratory 
work and three hours of conferences during the first 
semester. The course is designed especially for the train- 
ing of public health officers in advanced bacteriological 
technique. The students will be instructed in the meth- 



14 School of Hygiene and Public Health 

ods of recognition and isolation of the most important 
microbic agents of disease, and in the bacteriological ex- 
amination of water, sewage, milk, and foods. 

Immunology. This course will be given under the direction 
of Dr. C. G. Bull, Associate Professor of Immunology. 
It will consist of nine hours of laboratory work and three 
hours of lectures or conferences during the second semes- 
ter. Training will be given in serological reactions, in 
the preparation of microbic vaccines and immune sera 
and in the methods of their standardization. 

Introduction to Vital Statistics. This course will be 
given under the direction of Dr. Eaymond Pearl, Head 
of the Department of Biometry and Vital Statistics. 
Two lectures or conferences and six hours of laboratory 
work and reading weekly during the first semester. The 
course will be designed to acquaint the student, on the 
one hand, with modern methods of collecting, tabulating, 
adjusting, and drawing sound conclusions from statisti- 
cal data regarding human life, and, on the other hand, 
with the chief results which have accrued from the study 
of vital statistics in the past. The course will involve a 
considerable amount of laboratory work, in which the 
student will gain first-hand familiarity with statistical 
data and methods in the fields of hygiene and public 
health. Special emphasis will be placed upon modern 
biometric and graphic methods. 

Advanced Statistical Theory. Given under the direction 
of Dr. Pearl during the second semester. This course 
is designed for those expecting to specialize in some 
phase of statistical work, and will be opened only to 
a limited number of properly qualified students. It 
will vary in content in different years involving, at dif- 
ferent times, the discussion of such subjects as the theory 
of probability, curve fitting, the higher theory of correla- 
tion, actuarial mathematics, possible new applications 



Announcement of Courses 15 

of statistical methods in the fields of medicine and 
hygiene, etc. 

Chemical Methods Applied to Hygiene. Under the direc- 
tion of Dr. E. V. MeCollum, Head of the Department of 
Chemistry. The course will consist of nine hours of lab- 
oratory work weekly during the first semester. It will 
include a study of the composition of the more important 
foods, the changes undergone in cooking, preserving, 
storing, etc., and the nature of the substances used in 
adulterations. Practice will be given in the methods of 
water analysis, chemical treatment of waters, filtration, 
etc. 

Animal Nutrition. Dr. E. V. McCollum. Three lec- 
tures or conferences weekly during the second semester. 
In this course students will be given assigned readings 
upon which written or oral reports will be required. The 
special dietary properties of the natural food products 
will be discussed and the best methods of promoting 
nutrition through a proper combination of foods. 

Physiological Hygiene. Under the direction of Dr. W. H. 
Howell, Head of the Department of Physiology. The 
course will consist of three hours of lectures or confer- 
ences and six hours of laboratory work weekly during the 
second semester. The lectures will take up in series such 
topics as air and ventilation, heat regulation, the physio- 
logical action of light, and exercise and fatigue. In the 
laboratory work practical exercises will be given in the 
physical and chemical examination of air, in photometric 
and visual measurements and in the methods of studying 
muscular and nervous activity. 

Special Lectures. Arrangements have been made for a 
series of lectures during the session by distinguished 
teachers, investigators, and administrators in the field of 
preventive medicine and sanitation. While these lectures 



16 School of Hygiene and Public Health 

are meant primarily for students in the School of Hy- 
giene and Public Health, they will be open to all inter- 
ested persons and especially to members of the medical 
profession. Among those who have signified their will- 
ingness to give one or more lectures in this course are the 
following: Dr. Hermann Biggs, Dr. Simon Flexner, Dr. 
Victor G. Heiser, Dr. William H. Park, Dr. Wickliffe 
Rose, Dr. Milton J. Eosenau, Dr. William T. Sedgwick, 
Dr. George C. Whipple. Their subjects will be an- 
nounced subsequently. 

Tuition 

The charge for tuition in the courses leading to a degree 
will be $250 per annum, payable at the office of the Registrar 
in semi-annual instalments, October 1st and February 1st. 
For students taking special courses the charge for each course 
will be arranged on application. 



For further information address the Director of the School 
of Hygiene and Public Health, care of the Johns Hopkins 
Medical School, Washington and Monument Streets, Balti- 
more, Md. 



If 



Series, 1919 Whole Number 311 



No. 1 



UHWEBSITY OF ILUH01S LIBRARY 

JUN % i i$^ 



THE 

JOHNS HOPKINS 
UNIVERSITY CIRCULAR 



SCHOOL OF HYGIENE AND 
PUBLIC HEALTH 



CATALOGUE AND ANNOUNCEMENT 
FOR 1919-1920 



Baltimore, Maryland 

Published by the University 

Issued Monthly from October to July 

January, 1919 



Entered, October 21, 1903, at Baltimore, Md., as second class matter, under 

Act of Congress of July 16, 1894 

Acceptance for mailing at special rate of postage provided for in Section 1103, 

Act of October 3, 1917. Authorized on July 3, 1918 



THE 



JOHNS HOPKINS UNIVERSITY 

SCHOOL OF HYGIENE AND 
PUBLIC HEALTH 

CATALOGUE AND ANNOUNCEMENT 
FOR 1919-1920 



H«. 




BALTIMORE 
The Johns Hopkins Press 

1919 



CONTENTS 



PAGE 

Calendar 5 

Trustees of the Johns Hopkins University 6 

Treasurer of the University 6 

Faculty 7 

Fellows 11 

Students 12 

Advisory Board of the Faculty 14 

Executive Committee 14 

Library Committee 14 

Other Officers 14 

General Statement and Requirements for Admission: 

General Statement 17 

Courses and Degrees: 

Doctor of Public Health 19 

Doctor of Science in Hygiene 20 

Bachelor of Science in Hygiene 22 

Certificate in Public Health 23 

Social Workers, Nurses and Teachers 24 

Special students 24 

Public and Special Lectures 24 

Scholarships 27 

Fellowships 27 

Registration and Calendar 28 

Tuition 28 

Departments of Instruction and Announcements of Courses: 

Bacteriology 31 

Immunology 32 

Sanitary Engineering 33 

Chemical Hygiene 34 

Protozoology and Medical Zoology 35 

Physiological Hygiene 37 

Biometry and Vital Statistics 39 

Schedules of Courses for the Session of 1919-1920: 

Doctor of Public Health 43 

Bachelor of Science in Hygiene 45 

Alphabetical Index of Names 49 

Index 51 



1919 




JANUARY 


FEBRUARY 


MARCH 


APRIL 




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1 

8 


2 
9 


8 

If 


4 
11 


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8 


4 


5 


6 


7 


1 
8 


2 


3 


4 


5 


C 


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1 
8 


6 7 


1 

8 


2 
9 


3 

10 


4 
11 


6 
12 




5 


6 7 




12 ] 


3 14 


15 


16 


17 


18 


9 


10 


11 


12 


13 


14 


15 


9 


10 


U 


12 


U 


14 


u 


13(14 


15 


10 


17 


16 


19 




19 5 


50 21 


22 


23 


24 


25 


16 


17 


18 


19 


20 


21 


22 


16 


17 


18 


19 


20 


21 


22 


20|21 


22 


28 


24 


26 


26 




26 ! 


!7 28 


29 


30 


31 




23 


24 


25 


26 


27 


28 




23 
30 


24 
31 


25 


26 


27 


28 


29 


27128 


29 


86 










MAY 


JUNE 


JULY 


AUGUST 




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1 
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3 

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3 

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4 

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5 
12 


6 
13 


7 
14 


8 


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1 

8 


2 
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3 
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4 
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5 
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3 


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7 


1 

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2 

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4 


5 6 


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14 


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CALENDAR, 1919-1920 



1919 
January 3, Friday — Instruction resumed. 
February 22, Saturday — Commemoration Day. Public exercises 

at 11 a. m. ; all classes suspended. 
April 17, Thursday — Easter Recess begins (no classes). 
April 24, Thursday — Instruction resumed. 
June 24, Tuesday — Conferring of Degrees (4 p. m.). 
September 30, Tuesday — Instruction begins. 

November 27, Thursday — Thanksgiving Day. All classes suspended. 
December 23, Tuesday — Christmas Recess begins (p. m.). 

1920 

January 5, Monday — Instruction resumed. 

February 23, Monday — Commemoration Day. Public exercises at 

11 a. m.; all classes suspended. 
April 1, Thursday — Easter recess begins (no classes). 
April 8, Thursday — Instruction resumed. 
June 15, Tuesday — Conferring of Degrees (4 p. m.). 



BOARD OF TRUSTEES 



R. Brent Keyser, President 
Eugene Levering 
Theodore Marburg 
bl an chard randall 
Henry D. Harlan, Secretary 
Miles White, Jr. 

The President of the University, ex officio 



B. Howell Griswold, Jr. 
John Glenn, Jr. 
Frederick W. Wood 
Daniel Willard 
Newton D. Baker 



W. Graham Boyce, Treasurer 



FACULTY 



FRANK JOHNSON GOODNOW, LL. D. 
President of the University 
A. B., Amherst College, 1879, and A. M., 1887 ; LL. B., Columbia University, 1882 ; 
LL. D., Amherst College, 1897, Columbia University, 1904, Harvard University, 
1909; Brown University, 1914, Princeton University, 1917; Professor of Admin- 
istrative Law, Columbia University, 1887-1914. 

6 W. Madison St. 

WILLIAM HENRY WELCH, M. D., LL. D. 

Director and Head of the Department of Bacteriology and 

Immunology 

A. B. t Yale University, 1870; M. D., Columbia University (College of Physicians 
and Surgeons, N. Y.), 1875; M. D., (Hon.), University of Pennsylvania, 1894; 
LL. D., Western Reserve University, 1894, Yale University, 1896, Harvard Univer- 
sity, 1900, University of Toronto, 1903, Columbia University, 1904, Jefferson 
Medical College, 1907, Princeton University, 1910, Washington University, 1915, 
and University of Chicago, 1916 ; Professor of Pathological Anatomy and General 
Pathology in the Bellevue Hospital Medical College, N. Y., 1879-84 ; Dean of the 
Medical Faculty, 1889-98 ; President of the National Academy of Sciences, 
1913-1917 ; President of the Board of Directors of the Rockefeller Institute for 
Medical Research ; President of the American Association for the Advancement 
of Science, 1906 ; President of the American Medical Association, 1910-1911 ; 
Member of the American Philosophical Society ; Pathologist to the Johns Hopkins 
Hospital, and Baxley Professor of Pathology, 1884-1917. 

807 St. Paul St. 

WILLIAM HENRY HOWELL, Ph. D., M. D., Sc. D., LL. D. 
Assistant Director and Professor of Physiology 
A. B., Johns Hopkins University, 1881, Fellow, 1882-84, and Ph. D., 1884 ; LL. D., 
Trinity College (Conn.), 1901; Sc. D., Yale University, 1911; M. D. (Hon.), 
University of Michigan, 1890, LL. D., 1912 ; LL. D., Washington University, 
1915 ; Associate and Associate Professor in Biology, Johns Hopkins University, 
1885-1889 ; Lecturer and Professor of Physiology and Histology, University of 
Michigan, 1889-92 ; Associate Professor of Physiology, Harvard University, 1892- 
93 ; Member of the National Academy of Sciences and of the American Philosophi- 
cal Society ; Dean of the Medical Faculty, 1899-1911 ; Professor of Physiology, 
Medical School, 1893-1919. 

232 W. Lanvale St. 

CHARLES JOSEPH TILDEN, S. B. 
Professor of Civil Engineering — in charge of Instruction in Sanitary 

Engineering 
8. B., Harvard University, 1896; Instructor in Civil Engineering, Cornell Univer- 
sity, 1903--05 ; Professor of Engineering Mechanics, University of Michigan, 
1911-13; Member, American Society of Civil Engineers. 

143 W. Lanvale St. 

ELMER VERNER McCOLLUM, Ph.D. 

Professor of Bio-Chemist ry 
4. B., University of Kansas, 1903, and A.M., 1904; Ph.D., Yale University, 1906; 
Instructor, Assistant Professor, Associate Professor, and Professor of Agricultural 
Chemistry, University of Wisconsin, 1907-1917. 

Talbot Rd., Windsor Hills. 



8 School of Hygiene and Public Health 

RAYMOND PEARL, Ph.D. 

Professor of Biometry and Vital Statistics 
A. B., Dartmouth College, 1899 ; Ph. D., University of Michigan, 1902 Instr 
in Zoology, 1902-1906; in the University of Pennsylvania, 1006-1907; Biologist 
of the Maine Agricultural Experiment Station, 1907-17 ; Chief of the Statistical 
Division of the United States Food Administration, 1917-1919; Member of the 
National Academy of Sciences and of the American Philosophical Society; Asso- 
ciate Editor of Genetics, of the Journal of Experimental Zoology, and of the 
Publications of the American Statistical Association ; Chairman of the Editorial 
Board of the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. 

401 Hawthorne Rd., Roland Park. 



ASSOCIATE PROFESSORS 

WILLIAM WEBBER FORD, M. D., D. P. H. 

Associate Professor 6f Bacteriology 

A. B., Adelbert College, 1893; M. D., Johns' Hopkins University, 1898, Instructor, 
Associate, and Associate Professor of Bacteriologv, 1904-1910, Associate Pro* 
of Bacteriologv and Hvgiene, 1910-1917 ; D. P. H, McGill University, 1900, and 
Fellow in Pathology, 1899-1901 ; Resident House Officer, Johns Hopkins Hospital, 
1898-99 ; Fellow, Rockefeller Institute for Medical Research, 1901-02 ; Institute 
for Infectious Diseases, Berlin, 1901-1902, and Johns Hopkins University. 1902- 
1903 ; Hygienic Institute, University of Vienna, 1912-1913 ; Lecturer on Hygiene 
and Legal Medicine, Johns Hopkins Medical School, 1917-. 

1124 N. Calvert St. 

CARROLL GIDEON BULL, M. D. 

Associate Professor of Immunology 
S. B., Peabody College, 1907 ; M. D., University of Nashville, 1909 ; Pathologist to 
Lincoln Memorial Hospital, 1910-1912 ; Assistant, Nelson Morris Institute for 
Medical Research, 1912-1913 ; Assistant and Associate in Pathology and Bacteri- 
ology, The Rockefeller Institute for Medical Research, 1913-1917 ; Major, Medical 
Corps, U. S. A., 1917-1918. 

214 E. 20th St. 



ASSOCIATES 

VICTOR EMANUEL NELSON, S. M. 

Associate in Bio-Chemistry 

S. B., and S. M., University of Wisconsin, 1912 and 1914, and Assistant and 
Instructor in Agricultural Chemistry, 1912-1917. 

3410 Beech Ave. 

GEORGE HENRY ROBINSON, Ph.D. 

Associate in Bacteriology 
A. B., Bates College, 1911; A.M. and Ph.D., Brown University, 1912 and 1914; 
Research Laboratory, H. K. Mulford Company, 1914-1918. 

3818 Barrington Rd. 

REYNOLD ALBRECHT SPAETH, Ph. D. 

Associate in Physiology 

8 '?«4„ Ha «t rf ?J d Col,e S e > 1909 ; A.M. and Ph.D., Harvard University, 1910 and 
1918; Sheldon Fellow, Physiological Institute, Kiel, 1913-1914; Instructor in 
Biology, Clark College, 1914-1915; Instructor in Biology, Yale College, 1915-1918. 

212 Longwood Rd., Roland Park. 



Faculty 



JOHN RICE MINER, A. B. 

Associate in Biometry and Vital Statistics 

A. B., University of Michigan, 1913; Computer, Maine Agricultural Experiment 
Station, 1913-1917 ; Biometrician, Statistical Division, U. S. Food Administration, 
1917-1918. 

2406 Callow Ave. 

LOWELL JACOB REED, Ph. D. 

Associate in Biometry and Vital Statistics 

S. B., and S. M., University of Maine, 1907 and 1912 ; Ph. D., University of Pennsyl- 
vania, 1916 ; Assistant Professor of Mathematics, University of Maine, 1916-1917 ; 
Director of Bureau of Tabulation and Statistics, War Trade Board, Washington, 
1917-1918. 

Riderwood, Md. 

ROBERT WILLIAM HEGNER, Ph.D. 

Associate in Protozoology 

S. B and S. M., University of Chicago, 1903 and 1904 ; Ph. D., University of 
Wisconsin, 1908 ; Instructor, University of Michigan, 1908-1910, and Assistant 
Professor, 1910-1917 ; Johnston Scholar, Johns Hopkins University, 1917-1918. 

712 Lin wood Ave., Tuxedo Park. 

WILLIAM WALTER CORT, Ph. D. 

Associate in Helminthology 

A. B., Colorado College, 1909 ; A. M. and Ph. D., University of Illinois, 1911 and 
1914 ; Professor of Biology, Macalester College, 1914-1917 ; Assistant Professor 
of Parasitology, University of California, 1917-1919 ; Consulting Helminthologist, 
State Board of Health, California, 1918-1919. 

312 W. Monument St. 

INSTRUCTORS 

HELEN TRACY PARSONS, S. M. 

Instructor in Bio-Chemistry 

S. B., Kansas State Agricultural College, 1911 ; S. M., University of Wisconsin, 
1916, Assistant and Instructor in Home Economics, 1913-1917. 

1731 Fair mount Ave. 

FLORENCE POWDERMAKER, S. B. 

Instructor in Bio-Chemistry 

S. B., Pennsylvania State College, 1915 ; Chemist, Baltimore City Health Depart- 
ment, 1915-1917 ; U. S. Department of Agriculture, 1917-1918 ; U. S. Food 
Administration, 1918. 

810 Whitelock St. 

SYLVIA LOUISE PARKER, A. B. 

Instructor in Biometry and Vital Statistics 
A. B., Mount Holyoke College, 1916, Laboratory Assistant in Zoology, 1916-1917 ; 
Assistant Biologist, Maine Agricultural Experiment Station, 1917-1918. 

157 W. Lanvale St. 

PAUL EATON, M. D. 

Instructor in Bacteriology 
A. B., Allegheny College, 1899 ; M. D., University of Pittsburgh, 1903. 

2100 Callow Ave. 



10 School of Hygiene and Public Health 

MARTHA KOEHNE, A. M. 
Instructor in Bio-Chemistry 
A B and A.M., Ohio State University, 1908 and 1910; Chemist, State Department 
of Health, Columbus, Ohio, 1911-1918. 

2907 Presstman St. 

JANET HOWELL CLARK, Ph.D. 

Instructor in Physiology 
A B Bryn Mawr College, 1910 ; A. M. and Ph. D., Johns Hopkins University, 1912 
'and 1913; Holder of the Helen Schaefifer Huff Fellowship, Bryn Mawr College, 
1912-1914, Instructor in Physics, 1914-1915; Holder of the Sarah Berliner 
Fellowship, 1915-1916; Instructor at Smith College, 1916-1917. 

232 W. Lanvale St. 

NINA SIMMONDS, S. B. 

Instructor in Bio-Chemistry 

S. B., University of Wisconsin, 1915, Assistant in Agricultural Chemistry, 1915- 
1917; Assistant in Bio-Chemistry, Johns Hopkins University, 1917-1918. 

511 N. Wolfe St. 
PERCY DA VOL MEADER, Ph.D. 

Instructor in Bacteriology 
Ph. B., Sc. M. and Ph.D., Brown University, 1914, 1916 and 1918; Assistant 
Bacteriologist, Providence Health Department, 1916-1918. 

813 N. Howard St. 

RUTH STOCKING LYNCH, Ph. D. 

Instructor in Protozoology 
A. B., Goucher, 1910 ; Fellow in Biology, Bryn MawT College, 1911-1912 ; Univer- 
sity Fellow, Johns Hopkins University, 1912-1913 ; Alice Freeman Palmer Fellow 
of Wellesley College, 1913-1914; Ph.D., Johns Hopkins University, 1915; 
Professor of Biology, Agnes Scott College, 1915-1916 ; Acting Professor of Biology, 
Wells, College, 1916-1917 ; Assistant Professor of Biology, Carnegie Institute of 
Technology, 1917-1918. 

211 Goodwood Gardens, Roland Park. 

WILLIAM HAY TALIAFERRO, Ph. D. 

Instructor in Protozoology 

S. B., University of Virginia, 1915 ; Assistant in Biology, Johns Hopkins University, 
1915-1917, Adam T. Bruce Fellow, 1917-1918, Ph. D., 1918 ; Lieutenant, Medical 
Research Division, Chemical Warfare Service, Yale University 1918 ; Johnston 
Scholar, Johns Hopkins University, 1919. 

2932 St. Paul St. 
ASSISTANTS 

LEWIS PADGETT 
Assistant in Biometry and Vital Statistics 
Graduate Columbia School of Drafting, 1912 ; Topographical Draftsman, U. S. 
Forest Service, 1913-1915; Assistant Chief Draftsman, U. S. Bureau of Mines, 
1915-1917; Chief Draftsman, U. S. Food Administration, 1917-1918. 

312 W. Monument St. 

IDA WILLIAMS PRITCHETT, A. B. 

Assistant in Immunology 
A. B., Bryn Mawr College, 1914 ; Technical Assistant, Rockefeller Institute for 
Medical Research, 1915-1917, and Fellow in Pathology and Bacteriology, 1917- 

1109 St. Paul St. 



Faculty 1 1 

AMY GEORGINA PHILLIPS 
Assistant in Biometry and Vital Statistics 

1435 Mt. Royal Ave. 

FELLOWS 

Nathan Berman. Port Chester, N. Y. 1005 St. Paul St. 

Ph. B., S. M., and Ph.D., Yale University, 1914, 1916 and 1917. Bacte- 
riology. 

Roscoe Raymond Hyde. Muncie, Ind. 3910 Groveland Ave. 

A. B., Indiana State Normal School, 1908 ; A. B. and A. M., Indiana Univer- 
sity, 1909 ; Ph. D., Columbia University, 1915. Immunology. 

Linda Bartels Lange. New York, N". Y. 804 N. Broadway. 

A. B., Bryn Mawr College, 1903 ; M. D., Johns Hopkins University, 1911. 
Bacteriology. 

Raymond Cleveland Salter. Madison, Wis. 312 W. Monument St. 

S. B., University of Wisconsin, 1915. Bacteriology. 

George Addison Talbert. Ripon,Wis. 614 N. Howard St. 

S. B., Ohio Wesleyan University, 1888; Graduate Student, Johns Hopkins 
University, 1888-1889 ; S. M., Ohio Wesleyan University, 1892 ; Graduate 
Student, University of Berlin, 1898-1899. Physiology. 

Walter Eugene Thrun. Ann Arbor, Mich. 1528 Hollins St. 

A. B. and S. M., University of Michigan, 1912 and 1914 ; Ph. D., University 
of Missouri, 1917. Bio-Chemistry. 



STUDENTS, 1918-1919 



CANDIDATES FOR THE DEGREE OF DOCTOR OF PUBLIC HEALTH 
John Atkinson Ferrell. New York, N. Y. The Altamont. 

S. B. and M. D., University of North Carolina, 1902 and 1907. 

Geraldo Horacio de Paula Souza. Sao Paulo, Brazil. 

Pharm. D., School of Pharmacy, S .o Paulo, 1908 ; M. D., Rio Janeiro, 1913. 

1318 McCulloh St. 

Francisco Borges Vieira. Sao Paulo, Brazil. 1318 McCulloh St. 
B. Sc. eLett., Gymnasium of S o Paulo, 1911 ; M. D., Rio Janeiro, 1917. 

George Huntington Williams. Baltimore, Md. 803 Cathedral St. 

A. B., Harvard University, 1915 ; Fourth Year Medical Student, Johns 

Hopkins University. 



CANDIDATE FOR THE DEGREE OF DOCTOR OF SCIENCE IN 
HYGIENE 

Samuel Pitlik. Worcester, Mass. 2206 E. Baltimore St. 

A. B , Clark College, 1917; A.M., University of Chicago, 1918. Statistics. 



CANDIDATES FOR THE DEGREE OF BACHELOR OF SCIENCE 
IN HYGIENE 

Edith Margaret Jane Barrett. Memphis, Tenn. 4025 Belle Ave. 

Student in Tulane University, 1915-1917, and Louisiana State Medical 
College, 1917-1918. 

Gladys Newman. Buffalo, N. Y. 4025 Belle Ave. 

A. B., Oberlin College, 1917. 



SPECIAL STUDENTS 
Rudolph Joseph Babor. New York, N. Y. 

S. B., Cornell University, 1918 ; Sanitary Corps, U. S. A. ; Nutrition. 

TTarry Edward Brown. Detroit, Mich. 1414 McCulloh St. 

A. B., University of Michigan, 1914 ; Bacteriology and Physiology. 

Gladys AW2INE Goddabd. New Salem, Mass. 13 E. Read St. 

Student Simmons College, 1910-1911 ; University of Zurich, 1911-1912 ; 

University of Geneva, 1912 ; Johns Hopkins University, 1917-1918 ; 

h> uiistry. 

12 



Students, 1918-1919 13 



William Pickard Jacocks. Elizabeth City, N. C. The Altamoivt. 

A. B. and A. M., University of North Carolina, 1904 and 1905 ; M. D., Univer- 
sity of Pennsylvania, 1911 ; Physiology , Protozoology and Statistics. 

Marie Louise Koch. Baltimore, Md. 2524 Maryland Ave. 

Statistics. 

Hertha Lichtenstein. Winona, Minn. 1523 McCulloh St. 

Bacteriology. 

Scheller Alexander Miller. West Point, Miss. 

S. B., Cornell University, 1911 ; Sanitary Corps, U. S. A. ; Nutrition. 

Florence King Payne. Port of Spain, Trinidad. 1305 Madison Av. 

M. D., Syracuse University, 1909; Bacteriology, Bio-Chemistry and Proto- 
zoology. 

Ralph Evans Stanton. Providence, R. I. 

Student in Brown University, 1915-1918 ; Sanitary Corps, U. S. A. ; Nutrition. 



14 Advisory Board of the Faculty 



ADVISORY BOARD OF THE FACULTY 

Frank J. Goodnow, President 
Carroll G. Bull Elmer V. McCollum 

William W. Ford Raymond Pearl 

Robert W. Hegner Charles J. Tilden 

William H. Howell William H. Welch 

Assistant Director Director 

By resolution of the Board of Trustees this Board is " instructed to 
report to the Trustees from time to time their suggestions and to 
prepare and carry forward the proper arrangements for the instruc- 
tion and graduation of students in the School." 



EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE 

The President of the University 
The Director The Assistant Director 



LIBRARY COMMITTEE 

Elmer V. McCollum, George H. Robinson 

Chairman Reynold A. Spaeth 

Lowell J. Reed Elisabeth S. Thies 

The Librarian of the University, ex officio 



OTHER OFFICERS 
Mary Louise Durham, Secretary 1700 St. Paul St. 

Elisabeth S. Thies, Librarian 2122 Chelsea Ave. 



GENERAL STATEMENT AND 
REQUIREMENTS FOR ADMISSION 



SCHOOL OF HYGIENE AND PUBLIC HEALTH 



GENERAL STATEMENT 

The need of larger and better opportunities in this coun- 
try for training and investigation in the science and art of 
Hygiene and Public Health has long been recognized. With 
the rapid advance in our knowledge of the causes and mode 
of spread of infectious diseases has come a correspondingly 
increased power of prevention which has greatly stimulated 
interest in preventive medicine and has strengthened the de- 
mands for improved standards of public health organization 
and administration. Especially urgent is the need for men 
and women trained to undertake work in this field which al- 
ready offers attractive careers for those properly qualified, and 
will offer opportunities in larger measure as the necessity for 
such training is more widely appreciated. It was a source of 
great gratification to the Johns Hopkins University to be 
enabled to open in October, 1918, a School of Hygiene and 
Public Health designed to meet the need thus briefly in- 
dicated. 

In June, 1916, the Rockefeller Foundation of New York 
notified the President of the Johns Hopkins University that 
the Foundation was prepared " to co-operate with the Uni- 
versity in the establishment of a School of Hygiene and Pub 
lie Health for the advancement of knowledge and the train- 
ing of investigators, teachers, officials and other workers in 
these fields." 

This offer was accepted by the University, and on June 
12, 1916, the President of the University made the formal 
announcement that the Board of Trustees had authorized the 
establishment of a School of Hygiene and Public Health as 
part of the University. Dr. William H. Welch was appointed 
Director and Dr. William H. Howell was named to assist in 
the work of organization. 

17 



18 School of Hygiene and Public Health 

The history of the events leading up to this action ifi in 
brief as follows: On October 16, 1914, the General Educa- 
tion Board called a conference of leading authorities in public 
health work to consider the general question of the training 
of qualified sanitarians and public health officials. At the 
request of this conference Dr. W. H. Welch and Dr. Wickliffe 
Eose undertook to prepare a plan for an Institute of Public 
Health and Hygiene for submission to the General Educa- 
tion Board and the members of the conference. This report 
was made to the General Education Board on May 27, 1915. 
Subsequently, on the instruction of the Board, a commii 
was appointed to determine where such an institution could 
be located most advantageously. Acting upon the informa- 
tion gathered by this committee the Eockefeller Foundation 
decided " largely by reason of the facilities, organization and 
ideals of its Medical School," to establish a School of Hygiene 
and Public Health at the Johns Hopkins University. 

The main objects of the School are to establish courses 
for the training of qualified persons for public health work, to 
promote investigative work in hygiene and preventive medi- 
cine and provide opportunities for the training of investiga- 
tors in these subjects, and to develop adequate means for the 
dissemination of sound hygienic knowledge. Special and 
mutual advantages arise from the close relationship between 
the School and the International Health Board of the 
Eockefeller Foundation, particularly in field work and in 
the opportunities for investigation and training in tropical 
medicine and the control of special diseases. As outlined at 
present the work of the School is organized under the follow- 
ing divisions : a department of bacteriology, serology and 
immunology; a department of protozoology and medical 
zoology; a department of epidemiology; a department of 
biometry and vital statistics; a department of chemical 
hygiene; a department of physiological hygiene; a general 
department in charge of field work and administrative 
methods. Provision is made for practical work in connection 



Courses and Degrees 19 

with federal, state and municipal departments of health and 
for instruction in sanitary engineering, infectious and occu- 
pational diseases and vocational, mental and social hygiene. 
Men and women are admitted on the same terms. 

A suitable lot of land has been purchased at the corner 
of Monument and Wolfe streets, immediately adjacent to 
the grounds of the Medical School and the Johns Hopkins 
Hospital. Plans have been made for the erection of a build- 
ing upon this lot to contain the laboratories, library, museum, 
and offices of the School. Pending the erection of this build- 
ing the School has been established in a large laboratory, 310- 
312 West Monument street, formerly occupied by the Physical 
Department of the Johns Hopkins University. This building 
has been completely renovated and equipped for its new 
purposes. Instruction began October 1, 1918. 

COURSES AND DEGREES 

I. Course leading to the degree of Doctor of Public 
Health (Dr. P.H.): 

The purpose of this course is to furnish instruction in 
public health knowledge and methods to those who have a 
liberal education and a fundamental training in medicine. 
The course will consist' of specified work throughout two 
years together with a summer spent in field work in some 
organized public health service. The specified work com- 
prises courses in the following subjects : advanced bacteriology 
and immunology; the chemical and bacteriological analysis 
of foods, water and sewage ; statistical methods ; sanitary and 
administrative law; nutritional and environmental hygiene; 
the history of hygiene; protozoology and medical zoology; 
epidemiology ; occupational diseases ; infectious diseases ; sani- 
tation and public health organization; sanitary engineering, 
and social and mental hygiene. It is understood that these 
requirements may be modified to suit the needs or aptitudes 
of special students. An essay based upon individual study 



20 School of Hygiene and Public Health 

of some problem or subject in hygiene is to be submitted 
before receiving the degree. Graduates in this course should 
be prepared to serve as public health officials in those impor- 
tant positions in which the health of large communities us 
involved and in which relations must be maintained both 
with the medical profession and the general public. The 
following groups of students will be accepted as candidates 
for this degree : 

a. Graduates of approved medical schools who have had a 

liberal education as evidenced by a degree in arts or 
science, or its equivalent. These candidates will be 
required to pursue a two-years' course together with 
one summer of practical work in an organized public- 
health service. 

b. Students who have completed satisfactorily three years 

of the course in an approved medical school and who 
have had a liberal education as evidenced by a degree 
in arts or science, or its equivalent. Arrangements 
have been made with the Johns Hopkins Medical 
School whereby students in this school can pursue a 
combined course in medicine and in public health of 
such a character that a student may receive his degree 
in medicine on the completion of four years' work, and 
his degree in public health after an additional or fifth 
year of work in the School of Hygiene and Public 
Health • together with a summer spent in practical 
field work. In their fourth year these students may 
fill all of their elective hours with subjects taken from 
the curriculum of the School of Hygiene and Public 
Health. 

II. Courses leading to the degree of Doctor of Science 
in Hygiene : 

The underlying object in the arrangement of these courses 
Ls to train specialists in the various departments of public 
health work, and to afford opportunity for those not gradu- 



Courses and Degrees 21 

ated in medicine to undertake public health work. The 
field is large and varied. In addition to general administra- 
tive officials and those immediately occupied with the pro- 
tection of the community from epidemics and insanitary 
conditions, it is obvious that specially trained individuals 
are needed in such matters as school hygiene, occupational 
hygiene, statistical investigations, nutritional problems, etc., 
both for the purpose of adding to knowledge and for giving 
special services. 

For work of this character previous training in the physical 
and biological sciences is more essential than acquaintance 
with clinical methods, and it is proposed, therefore, in plan- 
ning these courses, to base them upon a liberal education, and 
an adequate training in physics, chemistry, biology, and the 
medical sciences. After matriculation in the School each 
candidate will be expected to absolve certain courses of a 
basic character, but for the most part his time will be devoted 
to advanced work. This latter part of the work must include 
a special investigation of some problem the results of which 
are to be presented in the form of a dissertation. In view of 
the special requirements and the time implied in completing 
successfully a definite research, it may be assumed that after 
obtaining the bachelor's degree at least three years of work 
will be necessary to meet all the requirements of the degree 
of Doctor of Science in Hygiene. 

To be accepted as a candidate for this degree the following 
requirements must be fulfilled : 

a. A degree in arts or science or its equivalent, as evidence 

of a liberal education. 

b. Certificates of the satisfactory completion of adequate 

courses in chemistry, physics, and biology. 

c. Certificates of the satisfactory completion of adequate 

courses in anatomy, physiology, and pathology. 

d. In exceptional cases, on the recommendation of the head 

of a department, a candidate may be accepted who 



22 School of Hygiene and Public Health 

offers in place of (c) satisfactory evidence of special 
training of an advanced character in Bubjecta funda- 
mental to his main field of work. 

After acceptance as a candidate the student will be assigned 
for advice and guidance to the head of the department in 
which he will specialize. In order to be recommended for the 
degree the candidate must pass satisfactory written and oral 
examinations in his major subject and must present a dis- 
sertation, in prescribed form, embodying the results of an 
independent investigation. This dissertation must be pre- 
sented to the Director, who will refer it for examination to 
a special committee. If the report of the committee is favor- 
able the candidate will be asked to appear before the faculty 
for the oral examination. The dissertation must be published 
in whole or in part within a year after its acceptance by the 
faculty. 

III. Course leading to the degree of Bachelor of Science 
in Hygiene : 

It is evident that if public health work in this country de- 
velops along the lines followed at present there will soon be 
established in every communit}^ an organized service, includ- 
ing laboratory facilities, for the control of the health affairs 
of that community. For such services trained workers should 
be provided who can undertake the necessary work connected 
with the chemical and bacteriological examination of water, 
sewage, foods, excretions, blood; the preparation of bacterio- 
logical and serological material and sanitary inspections. 
Courses have been established for the training of such workers 
leading to the degree of Bachelor of Science in Hygiene. 
These courses require two years of combined work in the 
Medical School and the School of Hygiene and Public Health. 
They are based upon a liberal education and an adequate 
knowledge of physics, chemistry, and biology such as can be 
obtained in two years of a college course. The first year's 
work consists of courses in physiology, bacteriology, anatomy 



Courses and Degrees 23 

and histology, and the applications of physiology to school 
and industrial hygiene. The second year's work consists of 
courses in advanced bacteriology, immunology, parasitology, 
statistics, the chemistry of foods, water and sewage, nutri- 
tional hygiene, and sanitary engineering. The requirements 
for matriculation in these courses are as follows : 

a. Certificate of the completion of at least two years of 

work in an approved college. 

b. Certificates of adequate courses in biology, physics, and 

chemistry, including organic chemistry. 

By an adequate course is meant in physics one year of col- 
lege work covering approximately 100 hours of laboratory 
and 100 hours of class work; in biology one year of college 
work covering approximately 150 hours of laboratory and 
100 hours of class work; in chemistry one to two years of 
college work covering approximately 250 hours of laboratory 
and 120 hours of class work. 

IV. Courses leading to a Certificate in Public Health : 

A certificate in public health may be awarded to qualified 
persons after one year of residence and the satisfactory com- 
pletion of lectures and laboratory courses equivalent in 
amount to the work of a full academic year. The courses 
followed may vary according to the individual need of the 
applicant, but they must include practical work in epidemi- 
ology and in such other courses as may be approved by the 
faculty. 

Candidates for these certificates must be graduates in medi- 
cine of an approved medical school or graduates in arts or 
science who can furnish satisfactory evidence of previous 
training in the physical and medical sciences. 



24 School of Hygiene and Public Health 



SPECIAL STUDENTS 

An opportunity to use the facilities of the School will be 
granted to the following groups of special students not regis- 
tered as candidates for a degree : 

1. Public health officers who may wish to take one or more 

lectures or laboratory courses, or engage in the study 
of some special problem. 

2. Other qualified persons who may wish to attend special 

courses or undertake research work and whose quali- 
fications receive the formal approval of the faculty of 
the School. 

COURSES FOR SOCIAL WORKERS, NURSES, AND 
TEACHERS 

It is the intention of the School to organize, in the near 
future, a series of courses which will be designed especially 
for the instruction of health nurses, social workers, and 
teachers. These courses will be of a practical character, and 
those who register for them and pass the examinations will 
be granted suitable certificates. The relations of public and 
personal hygiene and of individual sanitation to the welfare 
of society will receive especial consideration. The details 
concerning these courses will be announced later. 

PUBLIC AND SPECIAL LECTURES 

In connection with the class courses a series of lectures, 
open to the public, will be arranged annually. The object 
of these lectures will be to bring before interested persons the 
general facts and points of view of modern hygiene, with the 
hope that in this way the School may serve as a center for 
the distribution of useful knowledge in all matters pertaining 
to sanitation and preventive medicine. At the end of each 
ion these lectures will be published in pamphlet form. 



Public and Special Lectures 25 

The following schedule was arranged for the academic year 
1918-1919: 

ProfessoY W. T. Sedgwick, of the Massachusetts Institute of Tech- 
nology. 
Subject: The Rise and Progress of Hygiene and Sanitation. 
Monday, October 7, 1918. 

Professor George C. Whipple, of Harvard University. 
Subjects: 1. Human Health and the American Engineer. 
2. Analyzing a Water Analysis. 
Monday and Tuesday, November 4-5, 1918. 

Professor W. F. Willcox, of Cornell University. 

Subjects: 1. The Prolongation of Life as a Test of Progress. 
2. The Birth Bate in the United States. 
Thursday and Friday, December 12-13, 1918. 

Dr. William H. Paek, of the Department of Health, City of New- 
York. 
iSubjects: 1. The Prevention of Diphtheria especially through 
Toxin-Antitoxin Injections. 
2. Organization of Municipal Health Laboratories. 
Monday and Tuesday, January 6-7, 1919. 

Dr. M. J. Rosenau, of Harvard University. 
Subjects: 1. Ptomaine Poisoning. 

2. The Cause and Mode of Spread of Influenza. 
Monday iand Tuesday, January 20-21, 1919. 

Dr. C. E. A. Winslow, of Yale University. 
Subjects: 1. Ventilation. 

2. Industrial Hygiene. 
Monday and Tuesday, February 10-11, 1919. 

Dr. Hermann M. Biggs, of the State Department of Health, New 
York. 
Subject: The Development of the Public Health Laboratory and 
its Influence on Public Health Work and Medical 
Practice. 
Monday, February 17, 1919. 

Dr. Simon Flexner, of the Rockefeller Institute for Medical Re- 
search. 
Subjects: 1. Epidemiology of Influenza. 

2. Epidemiology of Poliomyelitis. 
Monday and Tuesday, March 17 and 18, 1919. 



26 School of Hygiene and Public Health 

Dr. Edward R. Stitt, Rear Admiral, U. S. N. 

Subject: The Problem of Diagnosis in Tropical Disease*. 
Tuesday, March 25, 1919. 

Mr. Wickliffe Rose, General Director, Internationa] Health 
Board. 
Subject: Two Demonstrations in Malarial Control. 
Monday, April 14, 1919. 

In addition to these lectures designed especially for the 
general public, a second series will be given annually upon 
the general topic of Public Health Administration and 
Organization. While intended primarily for the students and 
staff of the School, these lectures will be opened also to a 
limited number of persons interested in the subjects discussed. 
The schedule of these lectures as arranged for the session of 
1918-19 was as follows : 

1. President F. J. Goodnow — On Administrative Law, February 

5, 7, 12, 14, 19, 21, 26, 28 and March 5, 7. 

2. Dr. John A. Ferrell, Director for the United States of the 

International Health Board — On Public Health Adminis- 
tration, March 12, 14, 19, 21. 

3. Col. Bailey K. Ashford, M. C, U. S. A. — On Military Hygiene. 

March 26, 28 and April 2, 4. 

4. Dr. James C. Pryor, Medical Director, U. S. X. — On Xaval 

Hygiene, April 9, 11, 16. 

5. Dr. Wade H. Frost, Surgeon, U. S. Public Health Service — 

On Methods of Epidemiology, April 25, 30, and May 2, 7. 

In response to a special request received from the Maryland 
Division of the National Congress of Mothers and endorsed 
by numerous women's organizations, the School proposes to 
arrange an annual course of public lectures upon the Prob- 
lems of Motherhood. The first series of these lectures was 
given during the session of 1918-1919 by Dr. J. Whitridge 
Williams, Dean of the Medical School and Professor of 
Obstetrics, as follows: 

1. The biological significance of reproduction. Statistical study 
of the birth and death rate, .and their national significance. 
April 3, 1919. 



Scholarships and Fellowships 27 

2. Study of the reproductive cells; their bearing upon reproduction 

.and heredity. Development of the embryo and its relation 
to the traditional views concerning maternal impressions. 
April 10, 1919. 

3. Changes in the maternal organism incident to pregnancy. The 

mechanical problems of labor; its dangers. The control of 
pain. April 17, 1919. 

4. The unnecessary wastage of infant life. Its avoidance by so- 

called pre-natal care. April 24, 1919. 

5. Criminal abortion and birth control. The ethics of some of the 

problems of maternity. May 1, 1919., 

SCHOLARSHIPS 

A certain number of scholarships carrying free tuition 
will be awarded annually by the Trustees of the University 
upon the recommendation of the faculty. These scholarships 
will be awarded for one year, but may be renewed for a sec- 
ond year at the discretion of the faculty. Applications may 
be made to the Director of the School. 

FELLOWSHIPS 

• 

Six research fellowships carrying each a stipend of $1,000, 
and exemption from all charges for tuition will be awarded 
annually by the Trustees of the University upon the recom- 
mendation of the faculty. The conditions upon which these 
fellowships will be awarded are as follows : 

1. The applicant must have received his doctor's degree in 

medicine, science, philosophy or public health, or fur- 
nish evidence of experience and meritorious service in 
scientific work. 

2. The holder of a fellowship must give his time pri- 

marily to investigative work, approved by some 
member of the staff of the School, and must be in 
residence during the academic year, unless permission 



28 School of Hygiene and Public Health 

is granted to him by the faculty to carry on his work- 
elsewhere. 
3. The application should be made prior to March 1st, in 
writing, addressed to the Director of the School of 
Hygiene and Public Health. 

REGISTRATION AND CALENDAR 

All students upon entering must report at the Director's 
office for registration and payment of fees. 

The academic year is the same as in other departments of 
the University (see page 5). 

Instruction begins in the fall on the Tuesday nearest to 
the first of October. The graduating exercises are held on 
the third Tuesday of June. There are short recesses at 
Christmas and Easter. 

Since instruction is arranged on a trimestral basis, it is 
possible for students to enter the School at the beginning of 
any trimester, and to graduate at the end of any trimester. 
Formal bestowal of degrees takes place at the University 
Commencement in June and on Commemoration Day. 
February 22nd. 

TUITION 

The charge for tuition in the courses leading to a degree 
or a certificate will be $250 per annum, payable at the office 
of the Director, in three instalments, one at the beginning 
of each trimester. For students taking special courses the 
charge for each course will be arranged on application. 



For further information address the Director of the School 
of Hygiene and Public Health, Johns Hopkins University, 
310-312 W. Monument Street, Baltimore, Md. 



DEPARTMENTS OF INSTRUCTION AND 

ANNOUNCEMENT OF COURSES 



DEPARTMENTS OF INSTRUCTION 



BACTERIOLOGY 

William W. Ford, M. D., Associate Professor. 
George H. Robinson, Ph. D., Associate. 
Paul Eaton, <M. D., Instructor. 
Percy D. (Meader, Ph. D., Instructor. 
Linda B. Lange, M. D., Fellow. 
Nathan Berman, Ph. D., Fellow. 
Raymond C. Salter, S. B., Fellow. 

1. Advanced Bacteriology. Dr. Ford, Dr. Bobinson, 
and the members of the staff. This course is designed especi- 
ally for the training of students in the modern bacteriological 
methods employed in the diagnosis of the acute respiratory 
diseases, in the study of the infections of the intestinal tract 
and in the examination of water, milk, and foods for their 
sanitary quality. It includes the study of the pneumococcus, 
the influenza bacillus, and the hemolytic streptococcus from 
sputum, the diphtheria bacillus from the secretions of the 
nose and throat, and the meningococcus from the spinal fluid. 
The newer methods for the cultivation of the tubercle bacil- 
lus from the sputum are demonstrated and the isolation of 
the typhoid, paratyphoid and dysentery bacilli practised as 
far as possible upon actual cases of disease. The standard 
methods employed in the examination of water, milk and food 
are considered in detail. Only those students will be admitted 
to this course who can present satisfactory evidence of proper 
training in elementary bacteriology. 

2. Elementary Bacteriology. Dr. Meader. This 
course is designed to give students a fundamental training 
in bacteriology with special reference to laboratory technique. 
It includes the making of the ordinary culture media, the 
preparation and use of stains and the methods of isolating 

31 



32 School of Hygiene and Public Health 

and identifying the more common pathogenic and non-patho- 
genic bacteria. Completion of this course qualifies students 
for the course in advanced bacteriology. 

3. Research in Bacteriology. Dr. Ford. Opportuni- 
ties are provided for advanced research work in bacteriology 
in a variety of fields. Qualified students will be given prob- 
lems to work out under the immediate supervision of the 
Associate Professor of Bacteriology, and opportunities will be 
offered to candidates for advanced degrees to prepare theses 
on special topics. 

IMMUNOLOGY 

Carroll G. Bull, M. D., Associate Professor. 

, Associate. 

Ida W. Pritchett, A. B., Assistant. 
Roscoe R. Hyde, Ph. D., Fellow. 

The course in immunology will consist of fifteen hours a 
week devoted to laboratory work and three hours to lectures 
and conferences during one trimester. 

The work consists of a systematic course of lectures or con- 
ferences on the principles and theories of infection and im- 
munity, of experimental work demonstrating these principles 
and theories, and of laboratory work designed to give train- 
ing in serological reactions and in the preparation of microbic 
vaccines and immune sera. Special attention is given to the 
application of immunologic principles and methods in pre- 
vention, diagnosis, and treatment of disease. 

The course is divided into sections as follows: 

1. Serological Reactions This part of the course 
consists of the preparation and demonstration of agglutinins, 
precipitins, hemolysins, opsonins, complement-fixing anti- 
bodies, etc. Practical methods, such as the Wassermann and 
Widal reactions, are given due consideration. 

2. Vaccines. The work of this section covers the prepa- 
ration and administration of vaccines — bacterial, rabies, and 
smallpox ; active immunization in prophylaxis and therapy. 



Departments of Instruction 33 

3. Immune Sera. In Section 3 work is given in the 
production and standardization of immune sera — antimicrobic 
and antitoxic. The production of bacterial toxins and toxin- 
antitoxin reactions are studied. The use of immune sera as 
preventive and therapeutic agents is demonstrated by appro- 
priate experiments. 

4. Infection and Immunity. Here a theoretical and 
practical study is made of the mechanisms of the interactions 
of attacking microorganisms and the attacked organism; 
considering, on the one hand, the instruments of infections — 
aggressins, toxins, capsule formation, etc., and, on the other 
hand, the defensive instruments of the host — antitoxins, 
lysins, opsonins, etc. Anaphylaxis is also studied in this 
portion of the course. 

SANITARY ENGINEERING 

Charles J. Tilden, S. B., Professor of Civil Engineering. 

John H. Gregory, S. B., Associate Professor of Civil Engineering. 

The course in Sanitary Engineering will be given at Home- 
wood in the Department of Civil Engineering, by Professor 
John H. Gregory. Three lectures or conferences and six hours 
of laboratory, field work, or reading during one trimester. 
The course will be designed to give the student a compre- 
hensive general view of modern sanitary engineering practice. 
The time will be about equally divided between the main 
topics of water supply and sewerage, with a discussion of 
modern methods of collecting and disposing of garbage and 
other municipal wastes. The laboratory exercises will include 
the study of existing sanitary works from photographs, work- 
ing drawings and specifications. This will be coordinated 
with inspection trips in the field to typical water purification 
and sewage disposal plants. 



34 School of Hygiene and Public Health 

CHEMICAL HYGIENE 

Elmer V. McCollum, Ph. J)., Professor. 
Victor E. Nelson, S. M., Associate 
Helen T. Parsons, S. M., Instructor. 
Florence Powdermaker, S. B., Instructor. 
Martha Koehne, 8. M., Instructor. 
Nina Simmonds, S. B., Instructor. 
Walter E. Thrun, Ph. D., Fellow. 

Chemical Methods Applied to Hygiene. Under the 
direction of Professor E. V. McCollum and Miss Powder- 
maker. The course will consist of fifteen hours of laboratory 
work and three conferences weekly during one trimester. It 
will include a study of the composition of the more important 
foods, the changes undergone in cooking, preserving, storing, 
etc., and the nature of the substances used in adulterations. 
Practice will be given in the methods of water analysis, 
chemical treatment of waters, filtration, etc. Students must 
have had courses in qualitative, quantitative and organic 
chemistry before being eligible to the course. 

Animal Nutrition. Dr. E. V. McCollum. Three lec- 
tures or conferences weekly during one trimester. In this 
course will be given assigned readings upon which written or 
oral reports will be required. The more important researches 
which have contributed to present day knowledge in this field 
are studied. The results of animal experimentation are cor- 
related with human experience as far as possible. The special 
dietary properties of our natural food products are discussed 
and the evidence of the relation between the diet and health 
of certain large groups of people is presented. 

Chemical Hygiene, Advanced. Dr. E. Y. McCollum. 
Those who have the necessary preliminary training and who 
desire to do work of a special nature will be received at any 
time during the academic year. 

Journal Club. One hour weekly during the year. Those 
who take part in this course are expected to report from time 
to time upon papers relating to Chemical Hygiene which 
appear in current journals. 



Departments of Instruction 35 



PROTOZOOLOGY AND MEDICAL ZOOLOGY 

Robert W. Hegner, Ph. D., Associate in Protozoology. 
William W. Cort, Ph. D., Associate in Helminthology. 
Ruth Stocking Lynch, Ph. D., Instructor in Protozoology. 
William H. Taliaferro, Ph. D., Instructor in Protozoology. 
, Instructor in Medical Entomology. 

1. Protozoology. Drs. Hegner, Lynch, and Taliaferro. 
Three days per week dnring one trimester. The course con- 
sists of three lectures or conferences and fifteen hours of 
laboratory work per week. The aims are (1) to gain a general 
knowledge of the biology of the protozoa; (2) to become ac- 
quainted with pathogenic species and the diseases caused by 
them; (3) to learn methods of preventing the spread of 
pathogenic species by the control of the agents of transmission ; 
(4) to acquire a knowledge of the problems presented by 
pathogenic species and the ability to solve them; thus laying 
the foundation necessary for carrying on original investiga- 
tions, and making it possible to take charge of public health 
work in Protozoology in any community, and to direct cam- 
paigns in cases of epidemics. 

The lectures and conferences are devoted to the presentation 
and discussion by instructors and students of information 
obtained from original observations, from current literature, 
and from text and reference books. 

In the laboratory the four classes of protozoa are consid- 
ered separately, involving the study (1) of typical free- 
living species, (2) of species parasitic in lower animals and 
(3) a more detailed examination of species parasitic in man. 
Methods are also learned of collecting, cultivating and pre- 
paring for study both free-living and parasitic protozoa. 

2. Parasitology. Drs. Hegner and associates in Hel- 
minthology and Medical Entomology. Three days per week 
during one trimester. 

This course is designed especially for those who wish to 
gain a knowledge of the animal parasites of man in a short 



36 School of Hygiene and Public Health 

time. The more technical phases of the subjects of Proto- 
zoology, Medical Entomology and Helminthology are empha- 
sized. The student is taught to recognize the species of para- 
sites pathogenic to man and the diseases caused by them; 
how to collect, prepare for study, examine, and cultivate the 
more important species; and the practical methods of preven- 
tion and control. 

The lectures are supplemented by the required reading of 
scientific articles in periodicals and reference books. 

The laboratory work includes the study of stages of the life 
histories of the parasites; methods of preparing material for 
study; methods of laboratory diagnosis; the cultivation of 
parasites in lower animals and in artificial media ; and excur- 
sions to incoming ships, to hospitals, and to suitable areas 
near Baltimore for the purpose of learning how to recognize 
the diseases caused by parasites, how to collect material, and 
how to control carriers. 

3. Peotozoological Studies. Students who may be 
able to attend the School for only part of the year and at a 
time when the regular course in Protozoology is not given, 
may elect this course after consultation with the head of the 
department. Several hours per week will be spent with the 
instructor in charge, during which the student will be fur- 
nished with an outline of the work to be done and laboratory 
material. The subject matter considered and the credit given 
are the same as in the regular course, but students who elect 
this course must necessarily depend more upon their own 
resources and will receive less assistance from the instructors 
than the members of the regular class. 

4. Helminthology. Dr. Cort. Three days per week 
during one trimester. This course aims (1) to give a gen- 
eral knowledge of the biology of the flatworms (Platy- 
helminthes), round worms (Nemathelminthes), and certain 
other worms; (2) to acquaint the student with pathogenic 
species and the diseases caused by them; (3) to present meth- 
ods of preventing the spread of pathogenic species by the con- 



Departments of Instruction 37 

trol of the agents of transmission; and (4) to furnish a 
knowledge of the problems presented by pathogenic species 
that will enable the student to carry on original investigations 
or take charge of public health work in Helminthology. 

5. Medical Entomology. Dr. . Three 

days per week during one trimester. This course is devoted 
chiefly to a study of the insects that transmit the bacteria, 
protozoa, and worms that cause disease in man. Sufficient 
training in general entomology is included to furnish a foun- 
dation upon which to build a knowledge of the more important 
pathogenic species. Emphasis is placed on those phases of 
the subject relating to prevention and control. 

6. Investigations in Protozoology, Medical Ento- 

* 

mology and Helminthology. Students who have had 
sufficient training may undertake original investigations in any 
of the above subjects. Small problems may be completed by 
properly qualified students in one trimester, but usually a 
year or more is required. Those who wish to elect any of 
these subjects as majors toward the degree of Doctor of Science 
must plan their course so that several entire years may be 
devoted to research. 

PHYSIOLOGICAL HYGIENE 

William H. Howell, Ph. D., M. D., Professor. 
Reynold A. Spaeth, Ph. D., Associate. 
Janet Howell Clark, Ph. D., Instructor 

, Instructor. 

George A. TalbeRt, S. M., Fellow. 

By Physiological Hygiene is understood the application of 
the facts and principles of animal physiology to problems of 
personal and public hygiene. The development of modern 
hygiene has been chiefly along the lines of protection from 
infectious and contagious diseases, but it is obvious that there 
are other large fields of the subject which should be cultivated. 
The important subjects of diet and nutrition have been 
assigned to the department of Chemical Hygiene. In the 



38 School of Hygiene and Public Health 

department of Physiology two main lines of work will be 
followed, namely, the study of exercise and fatigue in their 
relations to the neuromuscular mechanisms and to the health 
of the body in general, and, secondly, the physiological eff< 
of the external environment. The general objective that will 
be held in view is to furnish a scientific preparation for work- 
in the field of industrial and educational hygiene. As organ- 
ized at present there will be a series of conferences or lectures 
three times a week and a series of laboratory exercises occupy- 
ing about fifteen hours a week during one trimester. The 
conferences will discuss the topics indicated above from both 
the practical and the theoretical side, but the laboratory 
exercises will be limited as far as possible to practical methods. 
Students taking this course must have had previous instruc- 
tion in animal physiology such as is given in medical schools. 
The course will be arranged in three parts, each under the 
special direction of one of the members of the staff. The 
schedule during the session of 1918-19 was as follows : 

I. The composition of the atmosphere in its relation to 
health, including the principles of ventilation and climatology. 
Dr. Howell. 

II. The physiological action of light, heat and other ra-. 
diations. Dr. Clark. 

III. Exercise and Fatigue, muscular and nervous. Dr. 
Spaeth. 

IV. Laboratory exercises. Drs. Howell, Spaeth and 
Clark. These exercises take up the methods of analyzing air 
for carbon dioxid, oxygen, moisture and various impurities 
such as carbon monoxide, sulphur dioxid, dust, etc.; photo- 
metric methods of determining illumination in rooms; the 
measurement of visual acuity and errors of vision and the 
physiological and psychological methods of studying the co- 
ordinated activities of the neuromuscular mechanisms and the 
phenomenon of fatigue in its relations to education and the 
industries. 



Departments of Instruction 39 

V. A Journal Club, consisting of the instructors and ad- 
vanced students in the department of Physiological Hygiene 
and in the department of Physiology in the Medical School, 
meets Wednesday at 9 a. m. throughout the year. The object 
of these meetings is to present and discuss recent experi- 
mental work in Physiology. 

VI. Research. Special or advanced students will be as- 
signed problems for investigation under the supervision of 
members of the staff. 

BIOMETRY AND VITAL STATISTICS 

Raymond Pearl, Ph. D., Professor. 
Lowell J. Reed, Ph. D., Associate. 
John R. Miner, A. M., Associate, 
Sylvia M. Parker, A. M., Instructor. 
Lewis Padgett, Assistant. 
Amy G. Phillips, Assistant. 

The work in this department is intended to meet the needs 
of two classes of students: (a) Those training for work in 
public health; (b) those intending to specialize in statistical 
work either as teachers, investigators, or administrators. 

I. Introduction to Vital Statistics. Dr. Pearl, Dr. 
Eeed, Mr. Miner, and Mr. Padgett. Three days per week 
during one trimester. The course will be designed to acquaint 
the student, on the one hand, with modern methods of collect- 
ing, tabulating, adjusting, and drawing sound conclusions 
from statistical data regarding human life, and, on the other 
hand, with the chief results which have accrued from the 
study of vital statistics in the past. The course will involve 
a considerable amount of laboratory work, in which the stu- 
dent will gain first-hand familiarity with statistical data and 
methods in the fields of hygiene and public health. Special 
emphasis will be placed upon modern biometric and graphic 
methods. 

II. Advanced Statistical Theory. Dr. Pearl and Dr. 
Reed. This course is designed for those expecting to spe- 



40 School of Hygiene and Public Health 

cialize in some phase of statistical work, and will be opened 
only to a limited number of properly qualified students. A 
prerequisite is Course I in Vital Statistics. It will vary in 
content in different years, involving, at different times, the 
discussion of such subjects as the theory of probability, curve 
fitting, the higher theory of correlation, actuarial mathe- 
matics, possible new applications of statistical methods in the 
fields of medicine and hygiene, etc. 

III. Investigations in Biometry and Vital Statis- 
tics. Dr. Pearl. In the work of the department special 
attention will be devoted to research. Properly qualified 
workers, who may be either candidates for the degree of 
Doctor of Science or special students, may be taken into the 
laboratory and either assigned problems in connection with 
.the general co-ordinated plan of investigation being pursued 
in the department, or aided and directed in the development 
of their own problems. The general lines along which re- 
search may profitably be undertaken in the department are : 
higher statistical theory, analytical studies on human vital 
statistics, genetic and other biological factors influencing the 
duration of life, the study by modern statistical methods of 
epidemiological problems. 



SCHEDULES OF COURSES FOR THE 

SESSION OF 1919-1920 



SCHEDULES OF COURSES 



SCHEDULE FOR THE COURSE LEADING TO THE DEGREE 
OF DOCTOR OF PUBLIC HEALTH 

The schedule arranged for candidates for the degree of 
Doctor of Public Health will consist of a series of trimestral 
laboratory courses together with certain general and special 
lecture courses. The laboratory courses will extend in most 
cases from 9 a. m. to 4 p. m. (Saturday, 9 a. m. to 1 p. m.), 
and will include appropriate lectures or conferences. Each 
student will be expected to complete satisfactorily twelve 
trimestral laboratory courses, taking two such courses in each 
trimester, so that under ordinary conditions two years will 
be required to complete the work for the degree. It is under- 
stood that candidates for the degree may enter upon their 
work at the beginning of any trimester. In making up his 
twelve required laboratory courses each student will be given 
an opportunity to elect two or three of these courses in one 
department. The additional elected courses will be of a spe- 
cial or advanced character. In addition each student will be 
expected to attend the afternoon lectures during one year, and 
will be requested to show evidence of satisfactory field or 
laboratory work during one summer in some approved public 
health service. 

Students taking the combined course in Medicine and 
Public Health will be required to absolve only nine of the 
trimestral laboratory courses. The following provisional an- 
nouncement is made of the arrangement of courses for the 
session of 1919-1920 : 

First Trimester (October to January) 
Laboratory Courses — 

Elementary Bacteriology Monday, Wednesday, Friday. 

Chemistry Tuesday, Thursday, Saturday. 

Sanitary Engineering Monday, Wednesday, Friday. 

Protozoology Tuesday, Thursday, Saturday. 

43 



44 School of Hygiene and Public Health 

Afternoon Lectures — 

Public Lectures Monday, 5 p. in., according to 

special announcement. 
Selected Topics in Hygiene. ..... Tuesday, 4 p. m., Dr. Welch. 

Venereal Diseases Wednesday, 4 p. m. 

Tuberculosis Thursday, 4 p. m. 

Second Trimester (January to March 15) 

Laboratory Courses — 

Advanced Bacteriology Monday, Wednesday, Friday. 

Statistics Tuesday, Thursday, Saturday. 

Epidemiology Monday, Wednesday, Friday. 

Entomology Tuesday, Thursday, Saturday. 

Afternoon Lectures — 

Public Lectur Monday, 5 p. m., according to 

special announcement. 

Selected Topics in Hygiene Tuesday, 4 p. m., Dr. Welch. 

Infectious Diseases Wednesday, 4 p. m. 

Metabolism and Nutrition Monday, Thursday, and Friday, 

4 p. m., Dr. McCollum. 

Third Trimester (March 15 to June) 

Laboratory Courses — 

Physiological Hygiene Monday, Wednesday, Friday. 

Immunology Tuesday, Thursday, Saturday. 

Helminthology Tuesday, Thursday, Saturday. 

Afternoon Lectures — 

Public Lectures Monday, 5 p. m., according to 

special announcement. 

Selected Topics in Hygiene Tuesday, 4 p. m., Dr. Welch. 

Administrative and Sanitary 
Law Wednesday, 4 p. m., President 

Goodnow. 
Mental and Social Hygiene Thursday, 4 p. m. 

While the selection of laboratory courses in any one trimester may 
be made, as far as possible, in accordance with the special needs of 
each student, the following arrangement is recommended : 

First Trimester — Elementary Bacteriology and Chemistry. 

Second Trimester — Advanced Bacteriology and Statistics. 

Third Trimester — Immunology and Applied Physiology. 



Schedules and Courses 45 

Fourth Trimester — Sanitary Engineering and Protozoology. 
Fifth Trimester — Epidemiology and Medical Entomology. 
Sixth Trimester — Helminthology and Advanced Elective in some 
one Department. 



SCHEDULE FOR THE COURSE LEADING TO THE 
DEGREE OF BACHELOR OF SCIENCE 

First Trimester (October to January) 

Elementary Bacteriology — School of Hygiene — 

Monday, Wednesday, Friday, 9 a. m. to 4 p. m. 
Histology — Medical School — 

Tuesday, Thursday, 9 a. m. to 4 p. m. 

Second Trimester (January to March 15) 

Anatomy — Medical School — 

Tuesday, Thursday, 9 a. m. to 4 p. m. 
Physiology — School of Hygiene — 

Monday, Wednesday, Friday, 9 a. m. to 4 p. m. 

Third Trimester (March 15 to June) 

Physiology — Medical School — 

Lectures, 9 a. m., Tuesday, Thursday. 
Anatomy — Medical School — 

Tuesday, Thursday, 10 a. m. to 4 p. m. 
Physiological Hygiene — School of Hygiene — 

Monday, Wednesday, Friday, 9 a. m. to 4 p. m. 

Fourth Trimester (October to January) 

Chemistry — School of Hygiene — 

Tuesday, Thursday, Saturday, 9 a. m. to 4 p. m. 
Sanitary Engineering — Homewood — 

Monday, Wednesday, Friday, 9 a. m. to 1 p. m. 
Afternoon Lectures — 

Public Lectures — Monday, 5 p. m., according to special 

announcement. 
Selected Topics in Hygiene — Tuesday, 4 p. m., Dr. 
Welch. 

Fifth Trimester (January to March 15) 

Advanced Bacteriology — School of Hygiene — 

Monday, Wednesday, Friday, 9 a. m. to 4 p. m. 



46 School of Hygiene and Public Health 



Parasitology— School of Hygiei 

Tuesday, Thursday, Saturday, 9 a. m. to 4 p. m. 
Afternoon Lectures — 

Public Lectures — Monday, 5 p. m., according to special 

announcement. 
Selected Topics in Hygiene — Tuesday, 4 p. m., Dr. 

Welch. 
Metabolism and Nutrition — Monday, Thursday and Fri- 
day, 4 p. m., Dr. McCollum. 

Sixth Trimester (March 15 to June) 

Immunology — School of Hygiene — 

Tuesday, Thursday, Saturday, 9 a. m. to 4 p. m. 
Epidemiology — School of Hygiene — 

(Monday, Wednesday, Friday, 9 a. m. to 4 p. m. 
Afternoon Lectures — 

Public Lectures — Monday, 5 p. m., according to special 

announcement. 
Selected Topics in Hygiene — Tuesday, 4 p. m., Dr. 

Welch. 
Administrative and Sanitary Law — Wednesday, 4 p. m.. 

President Goodnow. 
Mental and Social Hygiene — Thursday, 4 p. m. 



INDEX 



ALPHABETICAL INDEX OF NAMES 



PAGE 

Ashford. B. K 2G 

Babor, R. J 12 

Baker, N. D 6 

Barrett, E. J 12 

Herman, N 11, 31 

Biggs, II. M 25 

Boyce, W. G 6 

Brown, II. E 12 

Bull, C. G 8, 14, 32 

Clark, J. H 10, 37, 38 

Cort, W. W 9,35,36 

Durham, M. L 14 

Eaton, P 9, 31 

Ferrell, J. A 12, 26 

Flexner, S 25 

Ford, W. W 8, 14, 31, 32 

Frost, W. H 26 

Glenn, J. Jr 6 

Goddard, G. A 12 

Goodnow, F. J 7, 14, 26, 46 

Gregory, J. H 33 

Griswold, B. H., Jr 6 

Harlan, H. D 6 

Hegner, R. W 9,14,35 

Howell, W. H 7, 14, 17, 37, 38 

Hyde, R. R 11, 32 

Jacocks, W. P 13 

Keyser, R. B 6 

Koch, M. L 13 

Koehne, M 10, 34 

Lange, L. B 11, 31 

Levering, E 6 

Lichtenstein, H 13 

Lynch, R. S 10, 35 

McCollum, E. V 7, 14, 34, 44, 46 

Marburg, T 6 

Meader, P. D 10, 31 

Miller, S. A 13 

Miner, J. R 9, 39 

Nelson, V. E 8, 34 



PAGE 

Newman, G 12 

Padgett, L 10, 39 

Park, W. H , 25 

Parker, S. L 9, 39 

Parsons, H. T 9, 34 

Payne, F. K 13 

Pearl, R 8, 14, 39, 40 

Phillips, A. G 11, 39 

Pitlick, S 12 

Powdermaker, F 9, 34 

Pritchett, I. W 10, 32 

Pryor, J. C 26 

Randall, B 6 

Reed, L. J 9, 14, 39 

Robinson, G. H 8, 14, 31 

Rose, W 18, 26 

Rosenau, M 25 

Salter, R. C 11, 31 

Sedgwick, W. T 25 

Simmonds, N 10, 34 

Souza, G. H. de P 12 

Spaeth, R. A 8, 14, 37, 38 

Stanton, R. E 13 

Stilt, E. R 26 

Talbert, G. A 11, 37 

Taliaferro, W. H 10,35 

Tilden, C. J 7, 14, 33 

Thies, E. S 14 

Thrun, W. E 11, 34 

Vieira, F. B 12 

Welch, W. H..7, 14, 17, 18, 44, 45, 46 

Whipple, G. C 25 

White, M., Jr 6 

Willard, D 6 

Willcox, W. F 25 

Williams, G. II 12 

Williams, J. AV 26 

Winslow, C. E. A 25 

Wood, F. W 6 



49 



INDEX 



PAGE 

Admission, Requirements for ... . 

19, 20, 22, 23 

Advisory Board of the Faculty . . 14 

Assistant Director 7 

Assistants, List of 10, 11 

Associates. List of 8, 9 

Associate Professors, List of . . . . 8 
Announcement of Courses, Depart- 
ments of Instruction 
and, 

Bacteriology 31 

Biometry and Vital Statistics 3!) 

Chemical Hygiene 34 

Immunology 32 

Physiological Hygiene 37 

Protozoology and Medical Zo- 
ology 35 

Sanitary Engineering 33 

Social Workers, Nurses and 

Teachers 24 

Special Students 24 

Bachelor of Science in Hygiene, 
Course leading to the degree 

of 22 

Bacteriology, Course in 31 

Biometry and Vital Statistics, 

Course in 39 

Board of Trustees 6 

Advisory, of the Faculty ... 14 

Calendar 5 

Registration and 28 

Candidates for the Degree of 

Doctor of Public Health 12 

Doctor of Science in Hy- 
giene 12 

Bachelor of Science in Hy- 
giene 12 

Certificate in Public Health, 

Course leading to a 23 

Chemical Hygiene, Course in.... 34 

Committee, Executive 14 

Library 14 

Contents 3 

Courses and Degrees, 

Doctor of Public Health. . . 19 



PAGE 

Doctor of Science in Hy- 
giene 20 

Bachelor of Science in Hy- 
giene 22 

Certificate in Public Health, 23 
Social Workers, Nurses and 

Teachers 24 

Special Students 24 

Degrees, Candidates for 12 

Courses and 

Doctor of Public Health, 19 
Doctor of Science in 

Hygiene 20 

Bachelor of Science in 

Hygiene 2 2 

Certificate in Public 

Health 23 

Social Workers, Nurses 

and Teachers 24 

Special Students 24 

Departments of Instruction and 
Announcement of Courses: 

Bacteriology 31 

Biometry and Vital Statistics, 39 

Chemical Hygiene 34 

Immunology 32 

Physiological Hygiene 37 

Protozoology and Medical 

Zoology 35 

Sanitary Engineering....... 33 

Social Workers, Nurses 

and Teachers 2 4 

Special Students 24 

Director 7 

Director, Assistant 7 

Doctor of Public Health, Course 

leading to degree of 19 

Doctor of Science in Hygiene, 
Course leading to the degree 

of 20 

Executive Committee 14 

Faculty 7 

Advisory Board of the 14 

Fellows 11 

Fellowships 27 

51 



52 



School of Hygiene and Public II colli, 



r ige 

17 



General Statement 

Immunology, Course in 

Instruction, Departments of, and 
Announcement of Courses: 

Bacteriology 

Biometry and Vital Statistics', 

Chemical Hygiene 

Immunology 

Physiological Hygiene 

Protozoology and Medical 

Zoology 85 

Sanitary Engineering 33 

Social Workers, Nurses and 
Teachers 

Special Students 

Instructors, List of 9 

Lectures, Public and Special.... 

Library Committee 

Librarian 

Medical Zoology, Protozoology 

and, Course in 

Nurses and Teachers, Courses for 

Social Workers 

Other Officers 

Physiological Hygiene, Course in, 

President of the University 

Professors, List of 7, 8 

Associate, List of 8 

Protozoology and Medical Zo- 
ology, Course in 35 

Public and Special Lectures 24 



Requirements for Admission.... 
19, 20, 2 

Registration and Calendar 

Sanitary Engineering, Conr 
Schedules of Courses for Session 
1 !H 0-1920: 

Doctor of Public Health. . . 

Bachelor of Science in Hy- 
giene 

Scholarships 

Secretary 

Social Workers, Nurses and 

Teachers, Courses for 

Special Lectures, Public and.... 
Special Students, Courses for . . . 

List of 

Students, 1918-1919 

Statement, General 

Statistics, Biometry and Vital, 

Course in 

Teachers, Courses for Social 

Workers, Nurses and 

Treasurer of the University 

Trustees, Board of 

Tuition 

University, President of the .... 
Treasurer of the .... 

Trustees of the 

Zoology, Protozoology and Medi- 
cal, Course in 



pack 

2, 23 
28 
33 



24 
6 

a 

2S 
7 
6 
6 



7M] 



JUN 



lew Series, 1920 Whole Number 323 

No. 3 



THE 

1 JOHNS HOPKINS 
UNIVERSITY CIRCULAR 



SCHOOL OF HYGIENE AND 
PUBLIC HEALTH 

CATALOGUE AND ANNOUNCEMENT 
FOR 1920-1921 



Baltimore, Maryland 

Published by the University 

Issued Monthly, except February, June, August, September 

April, 1920 



Entered, October 21, 1902, at Baltimore, Md., as second class matter, under 
Act of Congress of July 16, 1894 

cceptanee for mailing at special rate of postage provided for in Section 1103, 
Act of October 3, 1917. Authorized on July 8, 1918 






THE 

JOHNS HOPKINS UNIVERSITY 

SCHOOL OF HYGIENE AND 
PUBLIC HEALTH 

CATALOGUE AND ANNOUNCEMENT 
FOR 1920-1921 




PM::*t|SB 




BALTIMORE 

The Johns Hopkins Press 

1920 



CONTENTS 



PAGE 

Calendar 5 

Trustees of the Johns Hopkins University . g 

Treasurer of the University 6 

Faculty 7 

Fellows 13 

Rockefeller Foundation Scholars 14 

Students 15 

Summary 20 

Advisory Board of the Faculty 21 

Executive Committee 21 

Committee on Applications 21 

Committee on Publications 21 

Library Committee 21 

Other Officers 2] 

General Statement and Requirements for Admission: 

General Statement 25 

Courses and Degrees: 

Doctor of Public Health 27 

Doctor of Science in Hygiene 29 

Bachelor of Science in Hygiene 30 

Certificate in Public Health 31 

Special students 32 

The De Lamar Lectures in Hygiene 32 

Public Lectures 33 

Course in School Hygiene 36 

Scholarships 30 

Fellowships 36 

Registration and Calendar 37 

Tuition 37 

Departments of Instruction and Announcements of Courses : 

Bacteriology 41 

Immunology 42 

Sanitary Engineering 43 

Chemical Hygiene 44 

Medical Zoology 45 

Physiological Hygiene 47 

Biometry and Vital Statistics 50 

Public Health Administration 54 

Epidemiology 55 

Schedules of Courses for the Season of 1920-1921 : 

Doctor of Public Health 59 

Bachelor of Science in Hygiene 62 

Intensive Course of Instruction for Public Health Officer 64 

Alphabetical Index of Names 67 

Index 69 



1920 


JANUARY 


FEBRUARY 


MARCH 


APRIL 


s 


M 


T 


W 


T 


F 


I 


s 


M 


T|W|T | F 


8 


S |M 


T|W|T | F 


S 


s 


M 


Tj 


W|T | F| S 










1 


2 


3 


i 


2 


3 


4 


5 


6 


7 




1 


2 


3 


4 


5 













1 


2 


3 


4 


6 


fi 


7 


R 


9 


10 


8 


9 


10 


11 


12 


18 


1 i 


7 


8 


9 


10 


11 


12 


13 


4 


6 





7 


S 


9 


10 


11 


12 


13 


14 


If, 


16 


17 


lfi 


If, 


17 


IS 


19 


20 


21 


14 


Lfi 


10 


17 


18 


19 


20 


11 


12 


13 


14 


15 


10 


17 


18 


19 


20 


21 


22 


23 


24 


22 


23 


24 


25 


26 


27 


28 


21 


22 


28 


24 


25 


20 


27 


18119 


20 


21 


22 


23 


24 


25 


26 


27 


28 


29 


30 


31 


29 


'•'• 






'•'• 






28 


29 


80 


31 








25126 


27 


28 


29 


30 




MAY 


JUNE 


JULY 


AUGUST 


s 


M 


T 


W|T | 


F 


S 


s 


M 


'1| 


W| 


T.| 


F 


S 


s 


M 


T 


WIT| 


F 


S 


8 


M 


T|W|T| 


FIS 














1 






1 


2 


3 


4 


fi 










1 


2 


3 


1 


2 


3 


4 


E 


6| 7 


2 


3 


4 


5 


6 


7 


8 


6 


7 


8 


9 


10 


11 


12 


4 


5 


6 


7 


8 


9 


10 


8 


9 


10 


11 


12 


13114 


9 


10 


11 


12 


13 


14 


15 


13 


14 


15 


16 


17 


18 


19 


11 


12 


13 


14 


15 


10 


17 


15 


10 


17 


IS 


19 


20 21 


16 


17 


18 


19 


20 


21 


22 




21 


22 


23 


24 


25 


26 




19 


20 


21 


22 


23 


2 4 




23 


24 


25 


20 


27 


28 


23 


24 


25 


26 


27 


28 


29 


27 


28 


29 


30 








25 


26 


27 


28 


29 


30 


31 


29 


30 


31 










80 


31 






























•• 










•• 














SEPTEMBER 


OCTOBER 


NOVEMBER 


DECEMBER 


s 


M 


T| 


W|T| 


F 


S 


s 


|M 


T 


W|T| 


P 


S 


s 


M 


T 


W|T | 


F 


S 


8 


II 


T 


W|T| 


F 


8 








1 


2 


3 


4 












1 


2 




1 


2 


3 


4 


5 











1 


2 


3 


4 


5 


6 


7 


8 


9 


10 


11 


3 


4 


5 


6 


7 


8 


9 


7 


8 


9 


10 


11 


12 


13 


5 





7 


S 


9 


10 


11 


12 


13 


14 


15 


16 


17 


18 


10 


11 


12 


13 


14 


15 


10 


14 


15 


16 


17 


18 


19 


20 


12 


13 


14 


15 


16 


17 


18 


19 


'20 


21 


22 


23 


24 


25 


17 


18 


19 


20 


21 


22 


23 


21 


22 


23 


24 


25 


20 


27 


19 


20 


21 


22 


23 


24 


25 


26 


27 


28 


29 


30 






24 


25 


26 


27 


28 


29 


30 


28 


29 


30 










20 


27 


28 


29 


30 


31 




1921 


JANUARY 


FEBRUARY 


MARCH 


APRIL 


SIM 




T 


W|T|F 


S 


s 


MIT| 


W|T|F 


S 


s 


M 


T|W|T|F 


S 


8 


M 


T 


W|T| ( F 


8 








.. 






1 




•• 1 


2 


3 


4 


5 






1 


2 


3 


4 


5 












1 


2 


2 


3 


4 


5 


6 


v 


8 


6 


7! 8 


9 


10 


11 


12 


6 


7 


8 


9 


10 


11 


12 


3 


4 


5 


6 


7 


8 


9 


9 


10 


11 


12 


13 


14 


15 


13 


14115 


16 


17 


18 


19 


13 


14 


15 


16 


17 


18 


19 


10 


11 


12 


13 


14 


15 


16 


16 


17 


18 


19 


20 


21 


22 


20 


21 22 23 


24 


25 


26 


20 


21 


22 


23 


24 


25 


26 


17 


IS 


19 


20 


21 


22 


23 


23 


24 


25 


26 


27 


28 


29 


27 


2'8..|..|..|..|.. 


27 


28|29 


30 


31 






24 


25 


26 


27 


28 


29 


30 


30 


81 












..|..|..|..|..|..].. 


..|.-|.. 






..].. 
















MAY 


.1UNE 


JULY 


AUGUST 


s 


M 


T 


W| 


T| 


F 


S 


S|M 


T 


W| 


T| 


F 


S 


S |M 


T 


W|T | F 


S 


SJM|T|W 


T | FIS 


l 


2 


3 


4 


5 


6 


7 








1 


2 


3 


4 












1 


?, 




1 


? 


3 


4 


51 8 


8 


y 


10 


11 


12 


13 


14 


5 


6 


7 


8 


9 


10 


11 


8 


4 


5 


6 


7 


8 


9 


7 


s 


9 


10 


11 


12|l3 


15 


16 


17 


18 


19 


20 


21 


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CALENDAR, 1920-1921 



1920 

April 1, Thursday — Easter recess begins (no classes). 

April 8, Thursday — Instruction resumed. 

June 15, Tuesday — Conferring of Degrees (4 p. m.). 

September 28, Tuesday — Instruction begins. 

Xovember 25, Thursday — Thanksgiving Day. (All classes sus- 
pended.) 

December 23, Thursday — Christmas recess begins (p. m. ). 

1921 

January 3, Monday — Instruction resumed. 

February 22, Tuesday — Commemoration Day. Public exercises at 
11 a. m. (All classes suspended.) 

March 24, Thursday — Easter recess begins (no classes). 

March 31, Thursday — Instruction resumed. 

June 21, Tuesday — Conferring of Degrees (4 p. m.). 



BOARD OF TRUSTEES 



R. Brent Keyser, President 
Eugene Levering 
Theodore Marburg. 
Blanchard Randall 
Henry J). Harlan, Secretary 
Mti.es White, Jr. 

The President of the University, ex officio 



B. Howell Geiswold, Jr. 
John Glenn, Jr. 
Frederick W. Wood 
Daniel Willaed 
Newton D. Baker 



W. Graham Boyce, Treasurer 



FACULTY 



FRANK JOHNSON GOODNOW, LL. D. 

President of the University 

A. B., Amherst College, 1879, and A. M., 1887 ; LL. B., Columbia University, 1882 ; 
LL. D., Amherst College, 1897, Columbia University, 1904, Harvard University, 
1909, Brown University, 1914, Princeton University, 1917 ; Professor of Admin- 
istrative Law, Columbia University, 1887-1914. 

6 W. Madison St. 

WILLIAM HENRY WELCH, M. D., LL. D. 

Director and Head of the Department of Bacteriology and 

Immunology 

A. B., Yale University, 1870 ; M. D., Columbia University (College of Physicians 
and Surgeons, N. Y.), 1875; M. D. (Hon.), University of Pennsylvania, 1894; 
LL. D., Western Reserve University, 1894, Yale University, 1896, Harvard 
University, 1900, University of Toronto, 1903, Columbia University, 1904, Jeffer- 
son Medical College, 1907, Princeton University, 1910, Washington University, 
1915, and University of Chicago, 1916 ; Professor of Pathological Anatomy and 
General Pathology in the Bellevue Hospital Medical College, N. Y., 1879-84; 
Pathologist to the Johns Hopkins Hospital and Baxley Professor of Pathology, 
1884-1916; Dean of the Medical Faculty, 1889-98; President of the National 
Academy of Sciences. 1913-1917 ; President of the Board of Directors of the 
Rockefeller Institute for Medical Research ; President of the American Association 
for the Advancement of Science, 1906 ; President of the American Meflical Asso- 
ciation, 1910-1911 ; Member of the American Philosophical Society. 

807 St. Paul St. 

WILLIAM HENRY HOWELL, Ph.D., M. D., Sc. D., LL. D. 

Assistant Director and Professor of Physiology 

A. B., Johns Hopkins University, 1881, Fellow, 1882-84, and Ph. D., 1884; LL. D., 
Trinity College (Conn.), 1901; Sc. D., Yale University, 1911; M. D. (Hon.), 
University of Michigan, 1890, LL. D,, 1912 ; LL. D., Washington University, 
1915 ; Associate and Associate Professor in Biology, Johns Hopkins University, 
1885-1889 ; Lecturer and Professor of Physiology and Histology, University of 
Michigan, 1889-92 ; Associate Professor of Physiology, Harvard University, 1892- 
93 ; Member of the National Academy of Sciences and of the American Philo- 
sophical Society; Dean of the Medical Faculty, 1899-1911; Professor of Physi- 
ology, Medical School, 1893-1919. 

232 W. Lanvale St. 

ELMER VERNER McCOLLUM, Ph.D. 

Professor of Bio-Chemistry 

A. B., University of Kansas, 1903, and A. M., 1904 ; Loomis Fellow, Yale Univer- 
sity. 1905-1906, and Ph. D., 1906 ; Instructor, Assistant Professor, Associate 
Professor, and Professor of Agricultural Chemistry, University of Wisconsin, 
1907-1917; Cutter Lecturer on Hygiene and Preventive Medicine, Harvard Univer- 
sity, 1917-1918; Member of the National Academy of Sciences; Associate Member 
Royal Academy of Medicine of Belgium ; Associate Editor, Journal of Biological 
Chemistry and Journal of Dental Research. 

Talbot Rd., Windsor Hills. 



127] 



8 School of Hygiene and Public Health [128 

RAYMOND PEARL, Ph.D., Sc.D., LL. D. 

Professor of Biometry and Vital statistics 
A B., Dartmouth College, 1899; Ph.D., University of Michigan, 1902; Sc.D., 
Dartmouth College, 1919 ; LL. D., University of Maine, 1919 ; Instructor in 
Zoology, University of Michigan, 1902-1906 ; in the University of Pennsylvania, 
1906-1907; Biologist of the Maine Agricultural Experiment Station, 1907-1917; 
Chief of the Statistical Division of the United States Food Administration, 
1917-1919 ; Member of the National Academy of Sciences and of the American 
Philosophical Society ; Fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences ; 
Associate Editor of Genetics and of the Journal of Experimental Zoology; 
Chairman of the Editorial Board of the Proceedings of the National Academy of 
Sciences ; Statistician of The Johns Hopkins Hospital. 

401 Hawthorn Rd., Roland Park. 

SIR ARTHUR NEWSHOLME, M. D. 

Resident Lecturer in Charge of Public Health Administration 
Knight Commander of the Bath (K. C. B.) ; M. D., University of London, 1881, and 
Certificate of Public Health, 1885 ; Medical Officer of Health, Clapham, 1885- 
1888 ; Medical Officer of Health, Brighton, 1889-1907 ; Milroy Lecturer, Royal 
College of Physicians, 1895; Fellow, Royal College of Physicians, 1898 ; Principal 
Medical Officer Local Government Board of England, 1908-1919 ; President, 
Society of Medical Officers of Health, 1900-1901 ; President, Epidemiological 
Society, 1907-1908 ; Member of Royal Commission on Venereal Diseases, of 
Army Sanitary Committee and of Interdepartmental Committees on Tuberculosis 
and on Dentai Registration ; Lieut. Col. R. A. M. C. (T) ; Member of Council of 
Imperial Cancer Fund ; Crown Nominee General Medical Council, 1909-1919. 

312 W. Monument St, 

WADE HAMPTON" FROST, M. D., Surgeon, U. S. P. H. S.* 

Resident Lecturer in Charge of Epidemiology 

A. B., University of Virginia, 1901, and M. D., 1903 ; Assistant Surgeon and 
Surgeon, United States Public Health Service, 1905- ; Director, Bureau of 
Sanitary Service, American Red Cross, 1917. 

113 W. Lanvale St. 

ASSOCIATE PROFESSORS 

WILLIAM WEBBER FORD, M. D., D. P. H. 

Associate Professor of Bacteriology 

A. B., Adelbert College, 1893 ; M. D., Johns Hopkins University, 1898, Instructor, 
Associate, and Associate Professor of Bacteriology, 1904-10, Associate Professor 
of Bacteriology and Hygiene, 1910-17; D. P. H., McGill University, 1900, and 
Fellow in Pathologv, 1899-1901 ; Resident House Officer, Johns Hopkins Hospital, 
1898-99 ; Fellow, Rockefeller Institute for Medical Research. 1901-02 ; Institute 
for Infectious Diseases, Berlin, 1901-02, and Johns Hopkins University, 1902-03 ; 
Hygienic Institute, University of Vienna, 1912-1913 ; Lecturer on Hygiene and 
Epidemiology, Johns Hopkins University, 1917 — . 

1124 N. -Calvert St. 

CARROLL GIDEON BULL, M. D. 

Associate Professor of Immunology 
S. B., Peabody College, 1907 ; M. D., University of Nashville, 1909 ; Pathologist to 
Lincoln Memorial Hospital, 1910-12 ; Assistant, Nelson Morris Institute for 
Medical Research, 1912-1913; Assistant and Associate in Pathologv and Bacte- 
riology, The Rockefeller Institute for Medical Research, 1913-1917 ; Major, 
Medical Corps, U. S. A., 1917-1918. 

Montgomery Road, Windsor Hills 



' Detailed to the School of Hygiene and Public Health by the Surgeon- General 
of the United States Public Health Service. 



129] Faculty 9 

JOHN HERBERT GREGORY, S. B. 

Associate Professor of Civil Engineering — in charge of Sanitary 

Engineering 

S. B., Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 1895, Hydraulic and Sanitary Engi- 
neer, 1895-1911, Consulting Sanitary Engineer, 1911 — ; Member American 
Society of Civil Engineers. 

3925 Canterbury Rd., Guilford. 

DAVID KLEIN, Ph. D.* 

Associate Professor of Bio-Chemistry 

A. B., and A. M., University of Illinois, 1906 and 1907 ; Instructor, University of 
Illinois, 1907 ; Ph. D., University of Wisconsin, 1910 ; Fellow, Assistant, Instruc- 
tor and Associate Professor, University of Wisconsin, 1908-1914 ; State Chemist, 
Illinois, 1914-1918 ; Captain, Sanitary Corps, U. S. A., 1918-1919, and Major, 
1919. 

LOWELL JACOB REED, Ph.D. 
Associate Professor of Biometry and Vital Statistics 

S. B. and S. M., University of Maine, 1907 and 1912, Ph. D„ University of Penn- 
sylvania, 1915 ; Assistant Professor of Mathematics, University of Maine, 1915- 
1917 ; Director of Bureau of Tabulation and Statistics, War Trade Board, Wash- 
ington, 1917-1918 ; Associate in Biometry and Vital Statistics, Johns Hopkins 
University, 1918-1919. 

Riderwood, Md. 

ROBERT WILLIAM HEGNER, Ph.D. 

Associate Professor of Protozoology 

S. B. and S. M„ University of Chicago, 1903 and 1904 ; Ph. D., University of 
Wisconsin, 1908 ; Instructor, University of Michigan, 1908-1910, and Assistant 
Professor, 1910-1917 ; Johnston Scholar, Johns Hopkins University, 1917-1918, 
and Associate in Protozoology, 1918-1919. 

218 Hawthorn Rd., Roland Park. 



LECTURERS 

WILLIAM TRAVIS HOWARD, M. D. 

Lecturer in Biometry and Vital Statistics 

If. D., University of Maryland, 1889 ; Graduate Student, Johns Hopkins University, 
1889-1894 ; University of Prague, 1895 ; University of Munich, 1906-1907 and 
1911; Professor of Pathology, Western Reserve University; Pathologist to the 
Lakeside and City Hospitals, Cleveland, 1894-1914 ; Bacteriologist Cleveland 
Board of Health, 1902-1914 ; Assistant Commissioner of Health, Baltimore, 1915- 
1919. 

1122 N. Calvert St. 

JOHN SAMUEL FULTON, M. D. 

Lecturer in Public Health 

A. B., St. Johns College, 1876 ; M. D., University of Maryland, 1881 ; Secretary 
State Board of Health, 1898-1907 ; and since 1912 ; Professor of State Medicine, 
University of Maryland, 1900-1918 ; Secretary-'General Fifth International Con- 
gress on Tuberculosis, 1908 ; Secretary-General Fifteenth International Congress 
on Hygiene and Demography* 1912 ; Fellow Royal Society of Physicians of 
Hungary; Lieut. -Col. M. R. C, U. S. Army, Retired. 

2211 St. Paul St. 



Resigned March 22, 1920. 



10 School of Hygiene and Public Health [ L30 

CHARLES HAMPSON JONES, M. J). 

Lecturer in Public Health 
MB CM, University of Edinborough, 1883; M. D. (Hon.), Oollege of Physicians 
'and Surgeons Baltimore, 1889; Commissioner of Health, Baltimore, 1898-1800; 
Assistant Commissioner, 1900-1915 ; Chief of Bureau of Communjcaole Diseases, 
(State Department of Health, 1915; Commissioner of Health, Baltimore, 1919; 
Professor of Hygiene and Preventive Medicine, University ot Maryland and 
College of Physicians and Surgeons. 

2529 St. Paul St. 
ASSOCIATES 

GEORGE HENRY ROBINSON, Pit. D. 

Associate in Bacteriology 
A. B., Bates College, 1911; A.M., Brown University, 1912, and Ph.D., 1914; 
Research Laboratory, H. K. Mulford Company, 1914-1918. 

3818 Barrington Road. 

REYNOLD ALBRECHT SPAETH, Ph.D. 

Associate in Physiology 
S. B., Haverford College, 1909 ; A. M., Harvard University, 1910, and Ph. D., 1913 ; 
Sheldon Fellow, Physiological Institute, Kiel, 1913-1914 ; Instructor in Biology, 
Clark College, 1914-15, and Yale University, 1915-18 ; Technical Assistant in 
Pharmacology, Hygienic Laboratory, U. S. Public Health Service, 1918. 

212 Longwood Rd., Roland Park 

JOHN RICE MINER, A. B. 

Associate in Biometry and Vital Statistics 

A. B., University of Michigan, 1913 ; Computer, Maine Agricultural Experiment 
Station, 1913-1917 ; Biometrician, Statistical Division, U. S. Food Administra- 
tion, 1917-1918. 

Towson, Md. 
WILLIAM WALTER CORT, Ph.D. 
Associate in Helminthology 

A. B., Colorado College, 1909 ; A. M. and Ph. D., University of Illinois, 1911 and 
1914 ; Professor of Biology, Macalester College, 1914-191G ; Assistant Professor 
of Zoology, University of California, 1916-1919 ; Consulting Helminthologist, 
State Board of Health, California, 1918-1919. 

3608 Woodbine Av., West Forest Park. 

WILLIAM C ABLER MOORE, Ph. D. 

Associate in Immunology 

S. B., Peabody College, 1903, Assistant in Chemistry and Physics, 1903-05 ; 
Instructor in Chemistry, University of Nashville, 1904-1906 ; Loewenthal Fellow, 
University of Chicago, 1907-1909, Ph.D., 1910; Instructor in Chemistry, 
Columbia University, 1909-1913; Research Chemist, National Carbon Company, 
1913-1919. 

4110 Fernhill Av. 

ROSCOE RAYMOND HYDE, Ph.D. 

Associate in Immunology 

A. B, and A.M., Indiana University, 1909; Ph. D., Columbia University, 1915; 
Assistant in Embryology, Indiana University, 1908-1909 ; Assistant Professor, 
Professor and Head of Department of Zoology and Physiology, Indiana State 
Normal School, 1909-1919; Lecturer in Genetics, Terre Haute Veterinary College, 
L910-1918; Dyckman Fellow, Columbia University, 1912-1913; Fellow, Johns 
Hopkins University, 1918-1919. 

4101 Penhurst A v. 



131] Faculty 11 

ARTHUR LOUIS MEYER, M. D. 

Associate in Physiology 

A. B., Beloit College, 1905 ; M. D., University of Pennsylvania, 1909 ; Harvard 
Medical School, 1912-1913 ; Oxford University and Cambridge University, 1913 ; 
Assistant, Russell Sage Institute of Pathology, 1914-1915; Assistant and Associate, 
Rockefeller Institute for Medical Research, 1915-1919 ; Captain, Medical Corps, 
U. S, A., 1918-1919. 

1109 St. Paul St. 

MATHILDE KOCH, S. M. 
Associate in Bio-Chemistry 

S. 1?., University of Chicago, 1910, and S. M., 1912 ; Research Assistant in Bio- 
Chemistry, 1910-1914 ; Special Expert, Hygienic Laboratory, United States Public 
Health Service, 1914-1915 ; Assistant in Chemistry, Psychiatric Institute, New 
York State Hospital, 1915-1920, and Acting Assistant in Serology, 1918-1920. 

2706 N. Charles St, 

JANET HOWELL CLARK, Ph.D. 

Associate in Physiology 

A. B., Bryn Mawr College, 1910; A. M., Johns Hopkins University, 1912, and Ph. D., 

1913 ; Huff Fellow. Bryn Mawr College, 1913-1914, and instructor in Physics, 
1914-1915 ; Sarah Berliner Fellow, 1915-1916 ; Instructor, Smith College, 1916- 
1917 ; Assistant in Pathology, Johns Hopkins University, 1917-1918, and Instruc- 
tor in Physiology, 1918-1919. 

232 W. Lanvale St. 

FRED MARLIN MEADER, M. D. 

Associate in Epidemiology 

S. R.. Weslcyan University, Conn., 1902, and S. Iff., 1905 ; M. D., Johns Hookins 
University, 1909 ; Instructor, Assistant Professor and Associate Professor, Syra- 
cuse Medical College, 1909-1914; City Bacteriologist, Syracuse, N. Y., 1912- 

1914 ; Director, Division Communicable Diseases, New York State Department 
of Health, 1914-1920 ; Captain Medical Corps, U. S. A., 1917-1918, and Major, 
1919. 

1425 Eutaw Place 



INSTRUCTORS 

HELEN TRACY PARSONS, S. M. 
Instructor in Bio-Chemistry 

S. B.. Kansas State Agricultural College, 1911 ; S. M., University of Wisconsin, 
1916, and Assistant and Instructor in Home Economics, 1913-17. 

1709 E. Fairmount Av. 

SYLVIA LOUISE PARKER, A. B. 

Instructor in Biometry and Vital Statistics 
A. B., Mount Holyoke College, 1916, and Laboratory Assistant in Zoology, 1916-17; 
Assistant Biologist, Maine Agricultural Experiment Station, 1917-18. 

Riderwood, Md. 

PAUL EATON, M. D. 

Instructor in Bacteriology 

A. B., Allegheny College, 1899 ; M. D., University of Pittsburgh, 1903. 

2100 Callow Av. 



12 School of Hygiene and Public Health [132 

MARTHA KOEIINE, A.M. 

Instructor in Bio-Chemistry 
A B., Ohio State University, 1908, and A. M., 1910 ; Chemist, State Department 
of Health, Columbus, Ohio, 1911-18. 

3507 Powhatan Av. 

NINA SIMMONDS, S. B. 

Instructor in Bio-Chemistry 

S. B., University of Wisconsin, 1915, Assistant in Agrk -ultural Chemistry, 1915- 
1917 ; Assistant in Bio-Chemistry, Johns Hopkins University, 1917-1918. 

511 N. Wolfe St. 

PERCY DAVOL MEADER, Pn. D. 
Instructor in Bacteriology 

Ph. B., Sc. M. and Ph. D., Brown University, 1914, 1916 and 1918 ; Assistant 
Bacteriologist, Providence Health Department, 1916-1918. 

813 N. Howard St. 

WILLIAM HAY TALIAFERRO, Pn. D. 
Instructor in Protozoology 

S. B., University of Virginia, 1915 ; Assistant in Biology, Johns Hopkins Univer- 
sity, 1915-1917, Adam T. Bruce Fellow, 1917-1918, Ph.D., 1918; Lieutenant, 
Medical Research Division, Chemical Warfare Service, Yale University, 1918 ; 
Johnston Scholar, Johns Hopkins University, 1919. 

1001 N. Charles St. 

FRANCIS METCALF ROOT, Ph.D. 

Teaching Felloio in Medical Entomology 

A. B., Oberlin College, 1911, A. Mr., 1912 ; Graduate Student, Johns Hopkins Univer- 
sity, 1912-1914, University Fellow, 1914-1915, Adam T. Bruce Fellow, 1915- 
1917, Ph. D., 1»17 ; Captain, Infantry, U. S. A., 1917-1919. 

2320 Callow Av. 

LINDA BARTELS LANGE, M. D. 
Instructor in Bacteriology 

A. B., Bryn Mawr College, 1903 ; M. D., Johns Hopkins University, 1911 ; Interne, 
New York Infirmary for Women and Children, 1911-1912 ; Fellow in Pathology 
and Bacteriology, Rockefeller Institute for Medical Research, 1912-1914 ; Pathol- 
ogist, Howard A. Kelly Hospital, Inc., 1914-1915 ; Instructor in Pathology, 
University of Wisconsin, 1915-1916 ; Assistant and Instructor in Medicine, Johns 
Hopkins University, 1916-1918, and Fellow in Bacteriology, 1918-1919. 

804 N. Broadway 



ASSISTANTS 

AMY GEORGINA PHILLIPS 

Assistant in Biometry and Vital Statistics 

700 Gladstone Av. 

CHESTER EARL RUTHERFORD 

Assistant in Biometry and Vital Statistics 

1524 Ellamont St. 



133] Faculty 13 

MADGE THURLOW MACKLIN, M. D. 

Assistant in Physiology 

A. B., Goucher College, 1914; M. D., Johns Hopkins University, 1919; Fellow, 
American University, Washington, 1915-1919 ; Dean Van Meter Fellow, Goucher 
College, 1918-1919. 

Belvedere and Denmore Avs. 

CHAKMIAN HOWELL, S. B. 

Assistant in Biometry and Vital Statistics 

S. B., Oakcliffe College, 1903. 

2410 Maryland Av. 

AGNES LATIMER BACON, A. B. 
Volunteer Assistant in Biometry and Vital Statistics 
A. B., Wellesley College, 1897. 

2316 N. Calvert St. 



FELLOWS BY COURTESY 
CHARLES EDMUND SIMON, M. D. 

A. B., Johns Hopkins Universtiy, 1888; M. D., Unversity of Maryland, 1890; 
Professor of Clinical Pathology, University of Maryland and College of Physi- 
cians and Surgeons, 1908-1920. Protozoology. 

1734 Linden Av. 

SAD AMU YOKOGAWA, M. D. 

M. D., College of Okayama, 1908 ; M. D., University of Kyoto, 1917 ; Professor of 
Pathology, Medical College, Taiwan, Formosa. Helminthology. 

718 N. Charles St. 



FELLOWS 

Mary Jane Hogue. West Chester, Pa. 821 N. Charles St. 

A. B., Goucher College, 1905 ; Ph. D., University of Wurzburg, 1909. 
Protozoology. 

Florence Powdermaker. Baltimore, Md. 810 Whitelock St. 

IS. B., Pennsylvania State College, 1915. Bio-Chemistry. 

Ida Williams Pritchett. Baltimore, Md. Homewood Apts. 

A. B., Bryn Mawr College, 1914. Immunology. 

Raymond Cleveland Salter. Madison, Wis. 2100 Callow Av. 

S. B., University of Wisconsin, 1915 ; S. M., Iowa State College, 1918. 
Bacteriology. 

Homer William Smith. 

A. B., University of Denver, 1917. Physiology. 

Luis Bartual Vicens.* Valencia, Spain. 

L. M., University of Valencia, 1915 ; M. D., University of Madrid, 1916. 
Immunology. 



Resigned February 1, 1920. 



14 School of Hygiene and Public Health [134 



ROCKEFELLER FOUNDATION SCHOLARS 

Eeginald Myers Atwater. Colorado Springs, Colo. 

A. B., Colorado College, 1914 ; M. D., Harvard University, 1918. 

2750 W. North Av. 

William Charles Boeck. Olivia, Minn. 2317 WhitUer Av. 

S. B., Carleton College, 1915 ; A. M. and Ph. D., University of California, 
1916 and 1918. 

Charles Nelson Leach.* 

A. B., Stanford University, 1909, and M. D., 1913. 

Kenneth Fuller Makcy. Baltimore, Md. 905 Cathedral 8t. 

A. B., George Washington University, 1911 ; M. D., Johns Hopkins Univer- 
sity, 1915. 



Not yet entered on his scholarship. 



STUDENTS, 1919-1920 



CANDIDATES FOR THE DEGREE OF DOCTOR OF PUBLIC HEALTH 
Charles Magee Anderson. Ottawa, Can. 218 W. Madison St. 

M. D. C. M., MtfGill University, 1916. 

Reginald Myers Atwater. Colorado Springs, Colo. 

A. B., Colorado College, 1914 ; M. D., Harvard University, 1918. Rocke- 
feller Foundation Scholar. 

2755 W. North Av. 

Garland Howard Bailey. Giatto, W. Va. 1512 N. Caroline St. 

S. B., West Visginia University, 1915 ; Fourth Year Medical Student, John9 
Hopkins University. 

Orvtlle Graham Brown. Washington, D. C. Fort Howard, Md. 

M. D., Columbia University, 1900 ; Colonel, Medical Corps, United States 
Army. 

John Collinson. Baltimore, Md. 16 W. Saratoga St. 

A. B., St. John's College, 1907; M. D., Johns Hopkins University, 1911. 

James Thambidurai Cornelius. Madras, India. 601 St. Paul St. 
A. M. and M. D., University of Cincinnati, 1919. 

Valcoulon LeMoyne Ellicott. Baltimore, Md. Melvale, Md. 

IS B., Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 1916 ; Fourth Year Medical 
Student, Johns Hopkins University. 

Regino Padua y Gaerlan. S. Juan, Union, P. I. 

M. D. and D. T. M., University of the Philippines, 1915 and 1918. 

900 Madison Av. 

Lim, Chong EANG. Fukien, China. 1008 Madison Av. 

M. B. and S. B., Hong Kong University, 1916. 

Kenneth Fuller Maxcy. Baltimore, Md. 905 Cathedral St. 

A. B., George Washington University, 1911 ; M. D., Johns Hopkins Univer- 
sity, 1915; Rockefeller Foundation Scholar. 

Daniel Murrah Molloy. Managua, Nicaragua. The Altamont. 
M. D., University of Nashville, 1908. 

Ralph Welty Nauss. Greenville, Ohio. 110 E. Preston St. 

S. B., Ohio State University, 1901; M. D., Northwestern University, 1905; 
D. P. H., University of Pennsylvania, 1916. 

Frank Oldt. Dayton, Ohio. 2409 N. Calvert St. 

A. B., Otterbein College, 1901 ; M. D., Ohio Medical University, 1905. 

George Calvin Payne. Muskogee, Okla. 2622 N. Calvert St. 

A. B., University of Missouri, 1910 ; M. D., Cornell University, 1912. 

135] 15 



16 School of Hygiene and Public Health [130 

John Arthur Franklin Pfeiffer. Baltimore, Md. 

M. D., Baltimore Medical College, 1908; A.M., George Washington I 
sity, 1916 and Ph. D., 1918. 

1112 N. titricker tit. 

Geraldo Horacio de Paula Souza. Sao Paulo, Brazil. 

Phavm. D., School of Pharmacy, Sao Paulo, 1908; M. D., Rio Janeiro, 101.;. 

1318 McCulloh tit. 

Francisco Borges Vieira. Sao Paulo, Brazil. 1318 McCulloh St. 
B. Sc. e Lett., Gymnasium of Sao Paulo, 1911; M. D., Rio Janeiro, 1017. 



CANDIDATES FOR THE DEGREE OF DOCTOR OF SCIENCE IN 
HYGIENE 

Clennie Elsie Bailey. Terre Haute, Ind. 328 E. 20th tit. 

A. B., Indiana State Normal School, 1917. Immunology. 

Hobart William Cromwell. Center Point, Ind. 

A. B., Indiana State Normal School, 1917. Immunology. 

4101 Penhurst Av. 

Mary Gover. Baltimore, Md. 600 N. Carrollton Av. 

A. B., Goucher College, 1913 ; A. M., Johns Hopkins University, 1917. 
Statistics. 

Amy Jane Leigh. Cedar City, Utah. 1425 Linden Av. 

S. B., Agricultural College of Utah, 1919. Bio-Chemistry. 

John Rice Miner. Baltimore, Md. Towson, Md. 

A. B., University of Michigan, 1913. Statistics. 

Samuel Pitlik. Worcester, Mass. 2206 E. Baltimore St. 

A. B., Clark College, 1917 ; A. M., University of Chicago, 1918. Statistics. 

Ida Williams Pritchett. Baltimore, Md. Homewood Apts. 

A. B., Bryn Mawr College, 1914. Immunology. Fellow, 1919-1920. 

Raymond Cleveland Salter. Madison, Wis. 2100 Callow Av. 

S. B., University of Wisconsin, 1915 ; S. IP., Iowa State College, 1918. 
Bacteriology. Fellow, 1919-1920. 

Homer William Smith. Denver, Colo. 3724 Greenmount Av. 

A. B., University of Denver, 1917. Physiology. Fellow, 1919-1920. 

CANDIDATES FOR THE DEGREE OF BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN 
HYGIENE 

Edith Margaret Jane Barrett. Memphis, Tenn. 4025 Belle Av. 

Student in Tulane University, 1915-1917 and Louisiana State Medical 
College, 1917-1918. 

Charles Raymond Cox. Baltimore. Md. Lutherville, Md. 

Student in Johns Hopkins University, 1919. 



137] Students, 1919-1920 17 

Ellen Boyden Finley. Albany, N". Y. Homewood Apts. 

A. B., Vassar College, 1916. 

Winifred Anderson Goodwin. Gross He, Mich. Cecil Apts. 

A. B., University of Michigan, 1914. 

Marie Louise Koch. Baltimore, Md. 2524: Maryland Av. 

Student, Johns Hopkins University, 1918-1919. 

Edith Evelyn Nicholls. Baltimore, Md. 3409 Guilford Terr. 

A. B., Smith College, 1919. 

Ella Hutzler Oppenheimer. Baltimore, Md. 1411 Eutaw Place 
A. B., Goucher College, 1918. 

David Henry Shelling. Hartford, Conn. 503 N. Wolfe St. 

iStudent, Loyola University, 1917-1918 and Trinity College, 1918-1919. 

Jean Chiron Snyder. Elyria, Ohio. 817 Park Av. 

A. B., Wellesley College, 1918. 

SPECIAL STUDENTS 
Anna Detring Schultze Abercrombie. Baltimore, Md. 

M. D., Woman's Medical College of Baltimore, 1908. Public Health Ad- 
ministration. 

1316 N. Charles St. 

Agnes Latimer Bacon. Baltimore. Md. 2316 N. Calvert St. 

A. B., Wellesley College, 1897. Statistics. 

Zdenek Bernard. Prague, Czechoslovakia. 212 W. Franklin St. 
M. D., University of Prague, 1914. Immunology, Physiological Hygiene. 

Magdalen Burger. Baltimore, Md. 1811 W. North A v. 

Statistics. 

Lillian Crombie Burroughs. Baltimore, Md. 2313 E. Federal St. 

A. B., Goucher College, 1917. Metabolism and Viet. 

Fred Cornelius Caldwell. Chicago, 111. 

S. B., University of Chicago, 1909 ; M. D., Rush Medical College, 1912. 
Medical Zoology. 

Anna Helen Emily Dorsey. Ellicott City, Md. Catonsville, Md. 

Bacteriology. 

Karel Driml. Chocen, Czechoslovakia. 212 W. Franklin St. 

M. D., University of Prague, 1914. Bacteriology, Protozoology, Public Health 
Administration, Statistics. 

Tage Ulrich Holton Ellinger. Copenhagen, Denmark. 

S. M., University of Copenhagen, 1917. Statistics. 

Ruxton, Md. 

Marian Gibson. Chicago, 111. 1015 Cathedral St. 

Statistics. 



18 School of Hygiene and Public Health [138 

John Homer Hamilton. Stillwater, Okla. 

S. B., Oklahoma Agricultural College, 1910 ; M. D., Harvard University, 1916. 
Medical Zoology. 

Walter Carl Hausheer. Norwich, N. Y. 

M. D., University of Pennsylvania, 1918. Medical Zoology. 

Charmian Howell. Atlanta, Ga. 2410 Maryland Av. 

S. B., Oakcliffe College, 1903. Statistics. 
Jaroslav Hulka. Strmilov, Czechoslovakia. 704 Madison Av. 

M. D., University of Prague, 1919. Public Health Administration. 

Fernald Everett Hulse. Arlington, Mass. 

S. B., Harvard University, 1915. Medical Entomology, Protozoology. 

Edgar Allen Jones. Cambridge, Md. 16 W. Saratoga St. 

M. D., Baltimore Medical College, 1893. Epidemiology. 

Victor Emanuel Levine. Omaha, Nebraska. 

A. B., College of the City of New York, 1909; A. M., Columbia University, 
19*11, and Ph. D., 1914. Chemical Hygiene (July to September, 1919). 

Hertiia Lichtenstein. Winona, Minn. 1510 Eut aw Place 

Bacteriology, Immunology. 

Edgar Smith Linthicum. Baltimore, Md. 2729 St. Paul St. 

M. D., Baltimore Medical College, 1906. Epidemiology, Public Health 
Administration, Sanitary Engineering. 

Elizabeth Moore MoKinney. Pittsburgh, Pa. 1225 Madison Av. 

S. B., Wilson College, 1895 ; M. D., Johns Hopkins University, 1901. 
Helminthology, Medical Entomology, Protozoology. 

Margaret Baxter MaoDonald. State College, Pa. 

A. B., Mount Holyoke College, 1898; Ph.D., Bryn Mawr College, 1902. 
Chemical Hygiene. 

917 W. Franklin St. 

Chester Lea Magee. Los Angeles, Cal. Coca Cola Bldg. 

A. B., Stanford University, 1895, and A. M., 1896 ; M. D., Johns Hopkins 
University, 1899. Medical Entomology. 

Florence King Payne. Muskogee, Okla. 2622 N. Calvert St. 

TVf. D., Syracuse University, 1909. Helminthology, Protozoology, Sanitary 
Engineering. 

Louis James Petritz. Rockford, 111. 905 St. Paul St. 

A. B., Holy Cross College, 1914 ; M. D., Northwestern University, 1918. 
Medical Zoology. 

Amy Georgina Phillips. Baltimore. Md. 700 Gladstone Av. 

Statistics. 

Blanche Pooler. Stillwater, Maine. 157 W. Lanvale St. 

Statistics. 

Florence Powdermaker. Baltimore, Md. 810 WhitelocJc St. 

S. B., Pennsylvania State College, 1915. Histology. Fellow 1919-1920. 



139] Students, 1019-1020 19 

Helen Mary Powell. Philadelphia, Pa. 1203 Madison Av. 

Bacteriology, Immunology, Parasitology. 

Alice Raymond. Leominster, Mass. 709 St. Paul St. 

A. B., Middlebury College, 1910. Statistics. 

Margaret Irma Riley. Elkridge, Md. Elkridge, Md. 

Statistics. 

Robert Hickman Riley. Cumberland, Md. 16 W. Saratoga St. 

S. B., University of Oklahoma, 1909, and M. D., 1915. Bacteriology, 
Epidemiology. 

Leoncio Lopez Rizal. Laguna, P. I. 900 Madison Av. 

A. B., Ateneo de Manila, 1903 ; M. D., University of the Philippines, 1909. 
Epidemiology, Statistics. 

Edwin William Schultze. Roanoke, Indiana. 515 N. Wolfe St. 

S. B., Winona College of Agriculture, 1913 ; A. B., University of Michigan, 
19114 ; M. D., Johns Hopkins University, 1917. Protozoology. 

Olive Cushing Smith. Baltimore, Md. 4 E. Biddle St. 

Statistics. 

Fred Lowe Soper. Hutchinson, Kansas. 

A. B., University of Kansas, 1914, and iS. M., 1916; M. D., Rush Medical 
College, 1918. Medical Zoology. 

Rebekah Sugar. Baltimore. Md. 140 E. Clement St. 

Statistics. 

Charles Cumming Tumbleson. Crownsville, Md. 

M. D. Immunology (April to August, 1919). 

Luis Bartual Vicens. Valencia, Spain. 4101 Penhurst Av. 

L. M., University of Valencia, 1915 ; M. D., University of Madrid, 1916. 
Immunology. Fellow 1919-1920. 

Ricardo Rivas Vides. San Salvador City. 9 E. Centre St. 

S. B., El Salvador Institute, 1906 ; M. D., El Salvador University, 1*916. 
Bacteriology, Immunology. 

John William Visher. Chicago, 111. 

A. B., University of South Dakota, 1914, and A.M., 1915; M. D., Rush 
Medical College, 1917. Medical Zoology. 

Corydon MoAlmont Wassell. Little Rock, Arkansas. 

M. D., University of Arkansas, 1909. Medical Zoology. 

2721 N. Charles St. 

Clark Harvey Yeager. Wilkesbarre, Pa. 

Y: D., University of Pennsylvania, 1911. Medical Zoology. 



20 /School of Hygiene and Public J I milk [140 

STUDENTS REGISTERED IN OTHBB DEPARTMENTS TAKING 
SPECIAL COURSES 

Leslie Carrington Beard, A. B., Department of Philosophy, 
Bacteriology. 

Sheonan Cheer, A. B., Department of Medicine, Immunology. 

Archibald Sweetland Dean, S. B., Department of Medicine, Bio- 
Chemistry. 

Benjamin Simon Neuhausen, A. B., Department of Philosophy, 
Bacteriology. 

Flora 'Dodler Sutton, A. B., Department of Philosophy, Statistics. 

Charlotte Condict Van Winkle, A. B., Department of Medicine, 
Public Health Administration. 

John Paul Visscher, A. B., Department of Philosophy, Parasit- 
ology, Protozoology. 



SUMMARY 

Candidates for the degree of Dr. P. H 17 

Candidates for the degree of Sc. D. in Hygiene .... 9 

Candidates for the degree of S. B. in Hygiene 9 

Special Students 49 

Total 84 



141] Advisory Board of the Faculty 21 



ADVISORY BOARD OF THE FACULTY 

Frank J. Goodnow, President 

Carroll G. Bull William H. Howell 

William W. Ford Assistant Director 

Wade H. Frost Elmer V. McCollum 

John H. Gregory Arthur Newsholme 

Robert W. Hegner Raymond Pearl 

William H. Welch, Director 

By resolution of the Board of Trustees this Board is " instructed 
to report to the Trustees from time to time their suggestions and to 
prepare and carry forward the proper arrangements for the instruc- 
tion and graduation of students in the School." 

EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE 

The President of the University 
The Director The Assistant Director 

LIBRARY COMMITTEE 

Elmer V. McCollum George H. Robinson 

Chairman Reynold A. Spaeth 

Lowell J. Reed Elizabeth S. Thies 

The Librarian of the University, ex officio 

COMMITTEE ON APPLICATIONS 

Carroll G. Bull Robert W. Hegner 

William W. Ford William H. Howell 

Chairman 

COMMITTEE ON PUBLICATIONS 

Robert W. Hegner William H. Howell 

Chairman Raymond Pearl 

OTHER OFFICERS 

Mary Louise Durham, Secretary 1700 St. Paul St. 

Elizabeth S. Thies, Librarian 2122 Chelsea Av. 

Ethel Norris, Artist • i 1925 Linden Av. 



GENERAL STATEMENT AND 
REQUIREMENTS FOR ADMISSION 



SCHOOL OF HYGIENE AND PUBLIC HEALTH 



GENERAL STATEMENT 

The need of larger and better opportunities in this coun- 
try for training and investigation in the science and art of 
Hygiene and Public Health has long been recognized. With 
the rapid advance in our knowledge of the causes and mode 
of spread of infectious diseases has come a correspondingly 
increased power of prevention which has greatly stimulated 
interest in preventive medicine and has strengthened the de- 
mands for. improved standards of public health organization 
and administration. Especially urgent is the need for men 
and women trained to undertake work in this field which al- 
ready offers attractive careers for those properly qualified, and 
will offer opportunities in larger measure as the necessity for 
such training is more widely appreciated. It was a source of 
great gratification to the Johns Hopkins University to be 
enabled to open in October, 1918, a School of Hygiene and 
Public Health designed to meet the need thus briefly in- 
dicated. 

In June, 1916, the Rockefeller Foundation of New York 
notified the President of the Johns Hopkins University that 
the Foundation was prepared " to co-operate with the Uni- 
versity in the establishment of a School of Hygiene and Pub- 
lic Health for the advancement of knowledge and the train- 
ing of investigators, teachers, officials and other workers in 
these fields." 

This offer was accepted by the University, and on June 
12, 1916, the President of the University made the formal 
announcement that the Board of Trustees had authorized the 
establishment of a School of Hygiene and Public Health as 
part of the University. Dr. William H. Welch was appointed 

145] 25 



26 School of Hygiene and Public Health [146 

Director and Dr. William H. Howell was named to assist in 
the work of organization. 

The history of the events leading up to this action ia in 
brief as follows: On October 16, 1914, the General Educa- 
tion Board called a conference of leading authorities in public 
health work to consider the general question of the training 
of qualified sanitarians and public health officials. At the 
request of this conference Dr. W. H. Welch and Mr. Wickliffe 
Kose undertook to prepare a plan for an institute of public 
health and hygiene for submission to the General Educa- 
tion Board and the members of the conference. This report 
was made to the General Education Board on May 27, 1915. 
Subsequently, on the instruction of the Board, a committee 
was appointed to determine where such an institution could 
be located most advantageously. Acting upon the informa- 
tion gathered by this committee the Eockefeller Foundation 
decided " largely by reason of the facilities, organization and 
ideals of its Medical School," to establish a School of Hygiene 
and Public Health at the Johns Hopkins University. 

The main objects of the School are to establish courses 
for the training of qualified persons for public health work, to 
promote investigative work in hygiene and preventive medi- 
cine and provide opportunities for the training of investiga- 
tors in these subjects, and to develop adequate means for the 
dissemination of sound hygienic knowledge. Special and 
mutual advantages arise from the close relationship between 
the School and the International Health Board of the 
Eockefeller Foundation, particularly in field work and in 
the opportunities for investigation and training in tropical 
medicine and the control of special diseases. As outlined at 
present the work of the School is organized under the follow- 
ing divisions: a department of bacteriology, serology and 
immunology; a department of medical zoology; a depart- 
ment of epidemiology; a department of biometry and vital 
statistics; a department of chemical hygiene; a department 
of physiological hygiene; a department of public health 



147] Courses and Degrees 27 

organization and administration. Provision is made for 
practical work in connection with federal, state and municipal 
departments of health and for instruction in sanitary engi- 
neering, infectious and occupational diseases and vocational, 
mental and social hygiene. Men and women are admitted 
on the same terms. 

A suitable lot of land has been purchased at the corner 
of Monument and Wolfe streets, immediately adjacent to 
the grounds of the Medical School and the Johns Hopkins 
Hospital. Plans have been made for the erection of build- 
ings upon this lot to contain the laboratories, library, mu- 
seum and offices of the School. Pending the erection pf these 
buildings the School has been established in a large laboratory, 
310-312 West Monument street, formerly occupied by the 
physical department of the Johns Hopkins University. 
This building and some of the adjacent laboratories formerly 
occupied by the University have been completely renovated 
and equipped for the use of the School. Instruction began 
October 1, 1918. 

COURSES AND DEGREES 

I. Course leading to the degree of Doctor of Public 
Health (Dr. P. H.) : 

The purpose of this course is to furnish instruction in 
public health knowledge and methods to those who have a 
liberal education and a fundamental training in medicine. 
The course will consist of specified work throughout two 
years, together with a summer spent in field work in some 
organized public health service. The specified work com- 
prises courses in the following subjects : advanced bacteriology 
and immunology; the chemical and bacteriological analysis 
of foods, water and sewage ; statistical methods ; sanitary and 
administrative law; nutritional and environmental hygiene; 
the history of hygiene; medical zoology; epidemiology; the 
administrative control of disease ; sanitation and public health 



28 School of Hygiene and Public Health [11* 

organization; sanitary engineering, and social and mental 
hygiene. It is understood that these requirements may be 
modified to suit the needs or aptitudes of special students. 
An essay based upon individual study of some problem or 
subject in hygiene is to be submitted before receiving the 
degree. Graduates in this course should be prepared to serve 
as public health officials in those important positions in which 
the health of large communities is involved and in which 
relations must be maintained both with the medical profession 
and the general public. The following groups of students 
will be accepted as candidates for this degree : 

a. Graduates of approved medical schools who have had a 

liberal education as evidenced by a degree in arts or 
science, or its equivalent. These candidates will be 
required to pursue a two-years' course together with 
one summer of practical work in an organized public 
health service. 

b. Students who have completed satisfactorily three years 

of the course in an approved medical school and who 
have had a liberal education as evidenced by a degree 
in arts or science, or its equivalent. Arrangements 
have been made with the Johns Hopkins Medical 
School whereby students in this school can pursue a 
combined course in medicine and in public health of 
such a character that a student may receive his de- 
gree in medicine on the completion of four years' 
work, and his degree in public health after an addi- 
tional or fifth year of work in the School of Hygiene 
and Public Health together with a summer spent in 
practical field work. In their fourth year these stu- 
dents may fill ail of their elective hours with subjects 
taken from the curriculum of the School of Hygiene 
and Public Health. A combined course of a similar 
character may be obtained with other medical schools 
by special arrangement. 



149] Courses and Degrees 29 

II. Courses leading to the degree of Doctor of Science in 
Hygiene : 

The underlying object in the arrangement of these courses 
is to train specialists in the various departments of public 
health work, and to afford opportunity for those not gradu- 
ated in medicine to undertake public health work. The 
field is large and varied. In addition to general administra- 
tive officials and those immediately occupied with the pro- 
tection of the community from epidemics and insanitary 
conditions, it is obvious that specially trained individuals 
are needed in such matters as school hygiene, occupational 
hygiene, statistical investigations, nutritional problems, etc., 
both for the purpose of adding to knowledge and for giving 
special services. 

For work of this character previous training in the physical 
and biological sciences is more essential than acquaintance 
with clinical methods, and it is proposed, therefore, in plan- 
ning these courses, to base them upon a liberal education, and 
an adequate training in physics, chemistry, biology, and the 
medical sciences. After matriculation in the School each 
candidate will be expected to absolve certain courses of a 
basic character, but for the most part his time will be devoted 
to advanced work. This latter part of the work must include 
a special investigation of some problem the results of which 
are to be presented in the form of a dissertation. In view of 
the special requirements and the time implied in completing 
successfully a definite research, it may be assumed that after 
obtaining the bachelor's degree at least three years of work 
will be necessary to meet all the requirements of the degree 
of Doctor of Science in Hygiene. 

To be accepted as a candidate for this degree the following 
requirements must be fulfilled. 

a. A' degree in arts or science or its equivalent, as evidence 

of a liberal education. 

b. Certificates of the satisfactory completion of adequate 

courses in chemistry, physics, and biology. 



?>0 School of Hygiene and Public Wealth [150 

c. Certificates of the satisfactory completion of adequate 

courses in anatomy, physiology, and pathology. 

d. In exceptional cases, on the recommendation of the head 

of a department, a candidate may be accepted who 
offers in place of (c) satisfactory evidence of special 
training of an advanced character in subjects funda- 
mental to his main field of work. 

After acceptance as a candidate the student will be assigned 
for advice and guidance to the head of the department in 
which he will specialize. In order to be recommended for the 
degree the candidate must pass satisfactory written and oral 
examinations in his major subject and must present a dis- 
sertation, in prescribed form, embodying the results of an 
independent investigation. This dissertation must be pre- 
sented to the Director, who will refer it for examination to 
a special committee. If the report of the committee is favor- 
able the candidate will be asked to appear before the faculty 
for the oral examination. The dissertation must be published 
in whole or in part within a year after its acceptance by the 
faculty. 

III. Course leading to the degree of Bachelor of Science 
in Hygiene: 

It is evident that if public health work in this country de- 
velops along the lines followed at present there will soon be 
established in every community an organized service, includ- 
ing laboratory facilities, for the control of the health affairs 
of that community. For such services trained workers should 
be provided Who can undertake the necessary work connected 
with the chemical and bacteriological examination of water, 
sewage, foods, excretions, blood; the preparation of bacterio- 
logical and serological material; sanitary inspections, etc. 
There is also a demand for workers, competent in statistical 
and actuarial lines, by health departments and by the medical 
and actuarial departments of large insurance companies. 
Courses have been established for the training of such work- 



151] Courses and Degrees 31 

ers leading to the degree of Bachelor of Science in Hygiene. 
These courses require two years of work in the School of Hy- 
giene and Public Health and the Medical School. They are 
based upon a liberal education and an adequate knowledge 
of physics, chemistry, and biology such as can be obtained in 
two years of a college course. The first year's work consists 
of courses in physiology, bacteriology, anatomy and histology, 
sanitary chemistry and physiology as applied to hygiene. The 
second year's work consists of courses in advanced bacteri- 
ology, immunology, parasitology, nutritional hygiene, sani- 
tary engineering, pathology, statistics and epidemiology. 
The arrangements of these courses is such as to permit some 
specialization. The student may select work preparatory to 
a position in laboratory diagnosis, or to a position along 
statistical and epidemiological lines. The requirements for 
matriculation in these courses are as follows : 

a. Certificate of matriculation in an approved college and 

the completion of >at least two years of college work. 

b. Certificates of adequate courses in biology, physics, and 

chemistry, including organic chemistry. 

By an adequate course is meant in physics one year of col- 
lege work covering approximately 100 hours of laboratory 
and 100 hours of class Work; in biology one year of college 
work covering approximately 150 hours of laboratory and 
100 hours of class work; in chemistry one to two years of 
college work covering approximately 250 hours of laboratory 
and 120 hours of class work. 

IV. Course leading to a Certificate in Public Health : 

A certificate in public health may be awarded to qualified 
persons after one year of residence and the satisfactory com- 
pletion of lectures and laboratory courses equivalent in 
amount to the work of a full academic year. The courses 
followed may vary according to the individual need of the 
applicant, but they must include practical work in epidemi- 



32 School of Hygiene and Public Health [152 

ology and in such other courses as may be approved by the 

faculty. 

Candidates for these certificates must be graduates in medi- 
cine of an approved medical school or graduates in arts or 
science who can furnish satisfactory evidence of previous 
training in the physical and medical sciences. 



SPECIAL STUDENTS 

An opportunity to use the facilities of the School will be 
granted to the following groups of special students not regis- 
tered as candidates for a degree : 

1. Public health officers who may wish to take one or more 

lectures or laboratory courses, or engage in the study 
of some special problem. 

2. Other qualified persons who may wish to attend spe- 

cial courses or undertake research work and whose 
qualifications receive the formal approval of the fac- 
ulty of the School. 



THE DE LAMAR LECTURES IN HYGIENE 

A series of popular lectures in personal and public hygiene 
will be arranged each session. The object of these lectures 
is to bring before the public the general facts and points of 
view of modern hygiene, with the hope that in this way 
the School may serve as a center for the distribution of useful 
knowledge in all matters pertaining to sanitation and pre- 
ventive medicine. These lectures are supported from the 
fund bequeathed to the Medical School by Joseph E. De 
Lamar. ' 

The course given during the session of 1919-1920 was as 
follows : 



153] De Lamar Lectures in Hygiene 33 

Sir Arthur Newsholme, M. D., K. C. B., 

Resident Lecturer in Public Health Administration 

Late Principal Medical Officer of the Local Government Board of 

England 
on 
Public Health Pioneers and Progress 
Monday, October 13 



Col. Georges Dreyer, M. D. 

Professor of Pathology, University of Oxford, 

on 

Physical Fitness and Vital Capacity 

Wednesday, October 22 



Dr. Howard A. Kelly, 
Emeritus Professor of Gynecology, Johns Hopkins University, 

on 

Some Knowledge of Fungi Essential to the Public Hygienist 

Monday, November 3 



Dr. Thomas M. Legge, C. B. E. 

H. M. Medical Inspector of Factories, Great Britain, 

on 

Industry under the Medieval Craft Guilds 

Monday, November 17 



Mr. Lawrence Veiller 

Secretary and Director, National Housing Association 

on 

Housing and Health 

Monday, November 24 



Sir Arthur Newsholme, M. D., K. C. B. 
on 

The Increasing Socialization of Medicine 
Monday, December 15 

2 



34 School of Hygiene and Public Health [154 

Dr. William F. Snow 
Executive Secretary of the American Social Hygiene Association 

on 
The Control of Venereal Diseases 
1 — The Basis for Combating Syphilis and Gonococcue 

Infections, Tuesday, December 16 
2 — The Medical Attack, Wednesday, December 17 
3 — The Legal Attack, Thursday, December 18 
4 — Educational Attack, Friday, December 19 



Dr. Victor C. Vaughan 
Professor of Hygiene and Physiological Chemistry, University of 

Michigan, 

on 

The Influenza Epidemic of 1918 



Major-General William C. Gorgas 

Late Surgeon-General, U. S. A., Director of the Yellow Fever 

Commission of the International Health Board, 

Rockefeller Foundation, 

on 

The Eradication of Yellow Fever with Especial Reference to Recent 

Work in South America 

Monday, January 12 



Mr. Irwin S. Osborn 

Consulting Engineer, Cleveland, Ohio, 

on 

The Collection and Disposal of Household Waste 

Monday, January 19 

Sir Arthur Newsholme, M. D., K. C. B. 
on 

Neo-Natal Mortality 
Monday, February 2 

Dr. Frederic S. Lee 

Professor of Physiology, Columbia University, 

on 

Some Problems of Industrial Physiology 

Monday, February 16 



155] De Lamar Lectures in Hygiene 35 

Dr. Allen W. Freeman 
Commissioner of Health, State of Ohio, 

on 

Public Health Administration of Ohio 

Monday, March 8 



Dr. Charles P. Emerson 
Professor of Medicine and Dean, Indiana University School of Medicine 

on 

Environmental Medicine 

Monday, March 29 



Dr. Thomas W. Salmon 
Medical Director, The National Committee for Mental Hygiene 

on 

The Field of Mental Hygiene 

Monday, April 12 



Dr. J. Whitridge Williams 

Professor of Obstetrics, Johns Hopkins University, 

on 

Relation of Venereal Diseases to the Child Bearing Process 

Monday, April 19 

and 
Monday, April 26 



Dr. Thomas A. Starkey 

Strathcona Professor of Hygiene, McGill University, 

on 

The Teaching of Hygiene in Medical Schools 

Monday, May 3 



Dr. J. Morris Slemons 

Professor of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Yale University, 

on 

The Nutrition of the Fetus 

Monday, May 10 



36 School of Hygiene and Public Health [156 

Course in School Hygiene 

In addition to this series of general lectures a special course 
of lectures in school hygiene, dealing particularly with the 
subjects of nutrition and diet, has been arranged for the 
summer course of the Johns Hopkins University, given at 
Homewood in July and August. This course is given under 
the direction of Professor McCollum, and is supported from 
the De Lamar Fund. 

SCHOLARSHIPS 

A certain number of scholarships carrying free tuition 
will be awarded annually by the Trustees of the University 
upon the recommendation of the faculty. These scholarships 
will be awarded for one year, but may be renewed for a sec- 
ond year. Applications may be made to the Director of the 
School. 

FELLOWSHIPS 

Six research fellowships carrying each a stipend of $1,000, 
and exemption from all charges for tuition are awarded 
annually by the Trustees of the University upon the recom- 
mendation of the faculty. The conditions upon which these 
fellowships are awarded are as follows: 

1. The applicant must have received his doctor's degree in 

medicine, science, philosophy or public health, or fur- 
nish evidence of experience and meritorious service in 
scientific work. 

2. The holder of a fellowship must give his time pri- 

marily to investigative work, approved by some mem- 
ber of the staff of the School, and must be in residence 
during the academic year, unless permission is granted 
to him by the faculty to carry on his work elsewhere. 

3. The application should be made prior to March 1st, in 

writing, addressed to the Director of the School of 
Hygiene and Public Health. 



ir> 7 I Registration — Tuition 37 



REGISTRATION AND CALENDAR 

All students upon entering must report at the Director's 
office for registration and payment of fees. 

The academic year is the same as in other departments of 
the University (see page 5). 

Instruction begins in the fall on the Tuesday nearest to 
the first of October. The graduating exercises are held on 
the third Tuesday of June. There are short recesses at 
Christmas and Easter. 

Since instruction is arranged on a trimestral basis, it is 
possible for students to enter the School at the beginning of 
any trimester, and to graduate at the end of any trimester. 
Formal bestowal of degrees takes place at the University 
Commencement in June and on Commemoration Bay, Feb- 
ruary 22nd. 

TUITION 

The charge for tuition in the courses leading to a degree 
or a certificate will be $250 per annum, payable at the office 
3f the Director, in three instalments, one at the beginning 
}f each trimester. For students taking special courses the 
charge for one trimestral course, including laboratory work, 
will be $50.00. The charge for shorter courses will be ar- 
ranged on application. 



For further information address the Director of the School 
3f Hygiene and Public Health, Johns Hopkins University, 
310-312 W. Monument Street, Baltimore, Md. 



DEPARTMENTS OF INSTRUCTION AND 
ANNOUNCEMENT OF COURSES 



DEPARTMENTS OF INSTRUCTION 



BACTERIOLOGY 

William W. Ford, M. D., Associate Professor. 
George H. Robinson, Ph. D., Associate. 
Paul Eaton, M. D., Instructor. 
Percy D. Meader, Ph. D., Instructor. 
Linda B. Lange, M. D., Instructor. 
Raymond C. Salter, S. B., Fellow. 

1. Sanitary Bacteriology. Dr. Meader, Dr. Lange. 
This course is designed to give students a fundamental train- 
ing in bacteriology with special reference to sanitary bacteri- 
ology. It includes the making of the ordinary culture media, 
the preparation and use of stains, the microscopic study of 
organisms, and the methods of isolating and identifying the 
more common pathogenic and non-pathogenic bacteria. The 
methods of examining water, milk, sewage, and foods are 
considered in detail. 

Students who have received training in chemistry, physics, 
and biology, are admitted to this course, and its completion 
qualifies students for the course in public health bacteriology. 

2. Public Health Bacteriology. Dr. Ford, Dr. Rob- 
inson, Dr. Eaton. This course is designed especially for the 
training of students in the modern bacteriological methods 
employed in the diagnosis of the acute respiratory diseases, 
in the study of the infections of the intestinal tract, and in 
the examination of water, milk, and foods for their sanitary 
quality. It includes the study of the pneumococcus, the in- 
fluenza bacillus, and the hemolytic streptococcus from spu- 
tum, the diphtheria bacillus from the secretions of the nose 
and throat, and the meningococcus from the spinal fluid. 
The newer methods. for the cultivation of the tubercle bacil- 
lus from sputum are demonstrated, and the isolation of the 

161] 41 



42 School of Hygiene and Public Health [162 

typhoid, paratyphoid, and dysentery bacilli practiced as far 
as possible upon actual cases of disease. The standard meth- 
ods employed in the examination of water, milk, and food 
are demonstrated. Only those students will be admitted to 
this course wtho can present satisfactory evidence of proper 
training in elementary bacteriology. 

3. Besearch in Bacteriology. Dr. Ford. Opportunity 
will be provided for advanced work and research in bacter- 
iology in a variety of fields. Qualified students will be given 
problems to work out under the immediate supervision of the 
Associate Professor of Bacteriology, and opportunities will 
be offered to candidates for advanced degrees to prepare theses 
on special topics. 

IMMUNOLOGY 

Carroll G. Bull, M. D., Associate Professor. 
Koscoe E. Hyde, Ph. D., Associate. 
William C. Moore, Ph. D., Associate. 
Ida W. Pritchett, A. B., Fellow. 
Luis Bartual Vicens, M. D., Fellow.* 

1. Immunology I. Dr. Hyde and Dr. Moore. The 
course consists of fifteen hours a week devoted to laboratory 
work and three hours to lectures and conferences during one 
trimester. The laboratory work is designed to give students 
training in (1) serological reactions, (2) the preparation of 
the materials used in these reactions, (3) the preparation of 
bacterial and virus vaccines to be used in prophylaxis and 
therapy, and (4) the production and standardization of im- 
mune sera — anti-microbic and antitoxic. Special attention 
is given to practical diagnostic methods such as the Widal 
test, the Wassermann reaction, the colloidal gold reaction, 
etc. 

2. Immunology II. Prerequisite, Immunology I or its 
equivalent. Dr. Bull and other members of the staff. The 
course consists of fifteen hours a week of laboratory work and 

* Resigned February 1, 1920. 



103] Departments of Instruction 43 

three hours of lectures and conferences. The work consists 
of a study of the nature of serological reactions and of the 
principles and theories of infection and resistance. The 
laboratory work is designed to demonstrate the mechanism 
of immunological reactions and of the interactions of in- 
fecting organisms and the infected host, considering, on the 
one hand, how bacteria and other parasites invade the host 
and produce disease, and, on the other hand, how the host re- 
sists invasion and overcomes infection. The latter part of 
the course is devoted to the application of immunological 
methods and principles in the diagnosis, prevention and 
treatment of disease. 

3. Research in Immunology. Dr. Bull, Dr. Hyde and 
Dr. Moore. Candidates for advanced degrees and other 
qualified students have the opportunity of carrying out in- 
vestigations on problems pertaining to immunity. The mem- 
ber of the staff under whose supervision the work is done de- 
pends upon the nature of the problem. 

SANITARY ENGINEERING 

John H. Gregory, S. B., Associate Professor of Civil Engineering. 

The course in sanitary engineering is given at Home- 
wood in the Department of Civil Engineering, and will con- 
sist of nine hours a week, during one trimester, divided into 
lectures, conferences, laboratory and field work, and supple- 
mented by reading. The course is designed to give the stu- 
dent a comprehensive general view of modern sanitary en- 
gineering practice. The time will be devoted largely to the 
main topics of water supply, water purification, sewerage and 
sewage disposal, with a discussion of modern methods of col- 
lecting and disposing of garbage and other municipal wastes. 
The laboratory exercises will include the study and discus- 
sion of existing sanitary works from photographs and work- 
ing drawings, together with inspection trips in the field to 
typical water purification and sewage disposal works. 



44 School of Hygiene and Public Health [164 



CHEMICAL HYGIENE 

Elmer V. McCollum, Ph.D., Professor. 
David Klein, Ph.D., Associate Professor. 
Mathilde Koch, S. M., Associate. 
Helen T. Parsons, S. M., Instructor. 
Martha Koeiine, A.M.. Instructor. 
Nina Simmonds, S. -B., Instructor. 
Florence Powdermaker, S. B., Fellow. 

Chemical Methods Applied to Hygiene. Under the 
direction of Professor E. V. McCollum and Associate. The 
course will consist of fifteen hours of laboratory work and 
three conferences weekly during one trimester. It will in- 
clude a study of the composition of the more important foods, 
the changes undergone in cooking, preserving, storing, etc., 
and the nature of the substances used in adulterations. Prac- 
tice Will be given in the methods of water analysis, chemical 
treatment of waters, filtration, etc. Students must have had 
courses in qualitative, quantitative and organic chemistry be- 
fore being eligible to the course. 

Animal Nutrition. Dr. E. V. McCollum. Three lec- 
tures or conferences weekly during one trimester. In this 
course will be given assigned readings upon which written 
or oral reports will be required. The more important re- 
searches which have contributed to present day knowledge in 
this field are studied. The results of animal experimenta- 
tion are correlated with human experience as far as possible. 
The special dietary properties of our natural food products 
are discussed and the evidence of the relation between the 
diet and health of certain large groups of people is presented. 

Chemical Hygiene, Advanced. Dr. E. Y. McCollum. 
Those who have the necessary preliminary training and who 
desire to do work of a special nature will be received at any 
time during the academic year. 

Journal Club. One hour weekly during the year. Those 

* Resigned March 22, 1920. 



165 | Departments of Instruction 45 

who take part in this course are expected to report from time 
to time upon papers relating to chemical hygiene which 
appear in current journals. 

MEDICAL ZOOLOGY 

Robert W. Hegner, Ph. D., Associate Professor of Protozoology. 
William W. Cort, Ph. D., Associate in Helminthology. 
William H. Taliaferro, Ph. D., Instructor in Protozoology. 
Francis M. Root, Ph. D., Teaching Fellow in Medical Entomology. 
Mary J. Hogue, Ph. D., Fellow. 

1. Protozoology. Drs. Hegner and Taliaferro. Three 
days per week during one trimester. The course consists of 
three lectures or conferences and fifteen hours of laboratory 
work per wleek. The aims are (1) to gain a general knowl- 
edge of the biology of the protozoa; (2) to become acquainted 
with pathogenic species and the diseases caused by them ; 
(3) to learn methods of preventing the spread of pathogenic 
species by the control of the agents of transmission; (4) to 
acquire a knowledge of the problems presented by pathogenic 
species and the ability to solve them; thus laying the foun- 
dation necessary for carrying on original investigations, and 
making it possible to take charge of public health work in 
protozoology in any community, and to direct campaigns in 
cases of epidemics. 

The lectures and conferences are devoted to the presenta- 
tion and discussion by instructors and students of information 
obtained from original observations, from current literature, 
and from text and reference books. 

In the laboratory the four classes of protozoa are consid- 
ered separately, involving the study (1) of typical free-living 
species, (2) of species parasitic in lower animals and (3) a 
more detailed examination of species parasitic in man. Meth- 
ods are demonstrated for collecting, cultivating and preparing 
for study both free-living and parasitic protozoa. 

2. Parasitology. Dr. Hegner and associates in hel- 



46 School of Hygiene and Public Health [166 

minthology and medical entomology. Three days per week 
during one trimester. 

This course is designed especially for those who wish to 
gain a knowledge of the animal parasites of man in a short 
time. The more technical phases of the subject of proto- 
zoology, helminthology and medical entomology are em- 
phasized. The student is taught to recognize the .species of 
parasites pathogenic to man and the diseases caused by them ; 
how to collect, prepare for study, examine, and cultivate the 
more important species ; and the practical methods of preven- 
tion and control. 

The lectures are supplemented by the required reading of 
scientific articles in periodicals and reference books. 

The laboratory work includes the study of stages of the life 
histories of the parasites; methods of preparing material for 
study; methods of laboratory diagnosis; the cultivation of 
parasites in lower animals and in artificial media ; and excur- 
sions to incoming ships, to hospitals, and to suitable areas 
near Baltimore for the purpose of learning how to recognize 
the diseases caused by parasites, how to collect material, and 
how to control carriers. 

3. Helminthology. Dr. Cort. Three days per week 
during one trimester. This course aims (1) to give a gen- 
eral knowledge of the biology of the flatworms (Platy- 
helminthes), round worms (Nemathelminthes), and certain 
other w^rms; (2) to acquaint the student with pathogenic 
species and the diseases caused by them; (3) to supply prac- 
tice in methods of diagnosis; (4) to present methods of pre- 
venting the spread of pathogenic species by the control of the 
agents of transmission; (5) to furnish a knowledge of the 
problems presented by pathogenic species that will enable 
the student to carry on original investigations or take charge 
of public health work in helminthology. 

4. Medical Entomology. Dr. Eoot. Three days per 
week during one trimester. This course is devoted chiefly 
to a study of the insects that transmit the bacteria, protozoa, 



107] Departments of Instruction -±7 

and worms that cause disease in man. Sufficient training: in 
general entomology is included to furnish a foundation upon 
which to build a knowledge of the more important patho- 
genic species. Emphasis is placed on those phases of the 
subject relating to prevention and control. 

5. Special Courses and Investigations in Protozool- 
ogy, Helminthology and Medical Entomology. Stu- 
dents who may be able to attend the School for only part of 
the year and at a time when the regular courses desired are 
not given may elect special courses after consultation with the 
head of the department. Several hours each week will be 
spent with the instructor in charge, during which the student 
will be furnished with an outline of the work to be done and 
laboratory material. The subject matter considered and the 
credit given are the same as in the regular courses, but stu- 
dents who elect special courses must necessarily depend more 
upon their own resources and will receive less assistance from 
the instructors than members of the regular class. 

Students wiho have had sufficient training may undertake 
original investigations in any of the above subjects. Small 
problems may be completed by properly qualified students in 
one trimester, but usually a year or more is required. Those 
who wish to elect any of these subjects as majors towards the 
degree of Doctor of Science in Hygiene must plan their 
course so that a large part of their time may be devoted to 
research. 

PHYSIOLOGICAL HYGIENE 

William H. Howell, Ph. D., M. D., Professor. 
Reynold A. Spaeth, Ph. D., Associate. 
Arthur L. Meyer, M. D., Associate. 
Janet H. Clark, Ph. D., Associate. 
Madge T. Macklin, M. D., Assistant. 
Homer W. Smith, A. B., Fellow. 

By physiological hygiene is understood the application of 
the facts and principles of animal physiology to problems of 
personal and public hygiene. The important subjects of diet 



Is School of Hygiene and Public Health [168 

and nutrition are considered in the department of chemical 
hygiene. In the department of physiological hygiene the 
subjects taken up, in addition to a general course m an una I 
physiology, are personal hygiene, the physiological effects 
of exercise and fatigue, of variations in the composition and 
physical properties of the atmosphere, and of radiant energy 
of various kinds. The main purpose held in view is to fur- 
nish a scientific preparation for work in the fields of industrial 
and school hygiene. The courses given are described in de- 
tail below. They consist of conferences or lectures and lab- 
oratory exercises. The conferences discuss the topics selected 
from both the practical and the theoretical side, but the 
laboratory work is limited as far as possible to practical 
methods and to visits of inspection. Course V, or an 
equivalent, is required as a preliminary to courses I, II, III 
and IV. 

I. The Physiology of Work and Fatigue in Industry. 
Dr. Spaeth. The lectures during the first month of this 
course will be devoted to a consideration of the theoretical 
and experimental aspects of muscular and mental work and 
fatigue. The remainder of the course will deal with practical 
problems such as the limitation of scientific management; 
the length of the industrial work day: night work vs. day 
work ; industrial accidents and fatigue ; monotony and incen- 
tives ; the emotionally unstable ; civilian shell-shock ana- 
logues; the standardization of industrial working conditions; 
physical examination of workers, and the physical, physio- 
logical and psychological standardization of industrial work- 
ers by trades and processes. 

Approximately six weeks will be taken up with laboratory 
training in physical, physiological and psychological stand- 
ardization tests for industrial workers. This work will be 
followed by class visits and surveys of local industries, with 
reports and seminar discussion. Three days weekly during 
the first trimester, 9 a. m. to 4 p. m. 

IT. The Physiological Action of Light, X-Eays, and 
other Eadiations. Dr. Clark. The lectures in this course 






109 1 Departments of Instruction it) 

will deal with the effects produced in the living cell by the 
action of heat, visible and ultraviolet light, x-rays and ra- 
dium. In connection with the pathological effects of radiant 
energy on the eye, the subject of illumination will be consid- 
ered, particularly in its relation to hygienic conditions of 
lighting in schools and factories. 

The laboratory work accompanying the lectures will in- 
clude photometric measurements of the illumination in rooms 
and the candle power of different light sources ; visual acuity 
determinations under different conditions of illumination, 
and measurements of errors of vision. There will, in addi- 
tion, be visits of inspection to local schools and factories for 
the investigation of lighting conditions. Three days weekly, 
9 a. m. to 4 p. m. during the first half of the third trimester. 

III. Kespiration, Ventilation and Climatology. Dr. 
Meyer. The lectures will consider the following topics : the 
composition 'of the atmosphere and the effect upon the body 
of the gases found in the atmosphere when present' in abnor- 
mal concentrations, together with the effects of the various 
meteorologic elements, such as temperature, pressure and hu- 
midity; heat regulation and heat production in the body and 
the effects of high temperatures and humidity upon the body 
under artificial and natural (tropical) conditions, as also the 
influence of various climatic conditions on the metabolism; 
ventilation in its physiological relations, including a study of 
the effects of bad air, the laws of air currents, and the vari- 
ous types of ventilation employed in schools, factories, street 
cars, subways, etc. 

The laboratory course is intended to familiarize the stu- 
dent with the methods of air analysis, including the quantita- 
tive determination of the presence of impurities, such as car- 
bon monoxid, sulphur dioxid, and dust. Exercises are given 
also in the use of various instruments applicable to the study 
of air conditions, such as the hygrometer, the kata-ther- 
mometer, the anemometer, etc. Three days weekly, 9 a. m. 
to 4 p. m., during the second half of the third trimester. 



50 School of Hygiene and Public Health [170 

IV. Personal Hygjene. Dr. Howell. Lectures upon the 
hygiene of the individual. The different organs of the body 

are considered in detail with reference to the conditions that 
influence their functional activity favorably or unfavorably. 
Once weekly during the third trimester. 

V. Animal Physiology. Dr. Macklin. Tin's course is 
intended primarily for candidates for the degree of Bachelor 
of Science in Hygiene. It comprises conferences and recita- 
tions covering the subject of animal or human physiology as 
usually given to medical students, and laboratory exercises. 
Three days weekly during the second trimester, 9 a. in. 
to 4 p. m. 

VI. Journal Club. Dr. Howell. A journal club con- 
sisting of the instructors and advanced students in the de- 
partments of physiological hygiene and in the department 
of physiology in the Medical School, meets once weekly 
throughout the year. The object of these meetings is to 
present and discuss recent experimental work in physiology. 

VII. Research. Special or advanced students will be 
assigned problems for investigation under the supervision of 
members of the staff. 

BIOMETRY AND VITAL STATISTICS 

Raymond Pearl, Ph. D., Professor. 
Lowell J. Reed, Ph. D., Associate Professor. 
William T. Howard, M. D., Lecturer. 
John R. Miner, A. B., Associate. 
Sylvia M. Parker, A. B., Instructor. 
Chester E. Rutherford, Assistant. 
Amy G. Phillips, Assistant. 
Charmian Howell, S. B., Assistant. 
Agnes L. Bacon, A. B., Volunteer Assistant. 

The Work of this department is intended to meet the needs 
of two classes of students: (a) Those training for work in 
public health; (b) those intending to specialize in statistical 
work either as teachers, investigators, or administrators. 



171] Departments of Instruction 51 

I. Introduction to Vital Statistics. Dr. Pearl, Dr. 
Reed, Mr. Minor, Miss Parker, and Mr. .Rutherford. Three 
days per week during one trimester. The course will be de- 
signed to acquaint the student, on the one hand, with mod- 
ern methods of collecting, tabulating, adjusting, and draw- 
ing sound conclusions from statistical data regarding hu- 
man life, and, on the other hand, with the chief results 
which have accrued from the study of vital statistics in the 
past. The course will involve a considerable amount of 
laboratory work, in which the student will gain first-hand 
familiarity with statistical data and methods in the fields of 
hygiene and public health. Special emphasis will be placed 
upon modern biometric and graphic methods. 

II. Mortality Tables. Dr. Eeed, Mrs. Howell. This 
course deals, in lectures and laboratory work, with the theory 
and practice of life table construction. The student will be 
familiarized with the standard methods of computing such 
tables, and of graduating such data, and also with certain 
novel methods devised in this department. The course is 
especially designed for (a) those intending to undertake 
public health work as a career; and (b) those planning to go 
into actuarial work. 

III. The Statistical Measurement of the Effect- 
iveness of Public Health Activities. Dr. Howard. This 
course, open only to those who have had course I in vital 
statistics, aims to give, by means of lectures and conferences, 
a historical and critical examination of the actual results of 
various public health activities. The most suitable statis- 
tical methods for the critical measurement of the effective- 
ness of such activities will be developed. 

IV. Advanced Statistical Theory. Dr. Pearl, Dr. 
Reed, and Mr. Miner. This course is designed for those ex- 
pecting to specialize in some phase of statistical work, and 
will be opened only to a limited number of properly qualified 
students. A prerequisite is course I in vital statistics. It 
will vary in content in different years, involving, at different 



52 School of Hygiene and Public Health \ L72 

times, the discussion of sucli subjects as the theory of prob- 
ability, curve fitting, the higher theory of correlation, ac- 
tuarial mathematics, possible new applications of statistical 
methods in the fields of medicine and hygiene, etc. 

V. Investigations in Biometry and Vital Statis- 
tics. Dr. Pearl. In the work of the department special at- 
tention will be devoted to research. Properly qualified work- 
ers, who may be either candidates for the degree of Doctor of 
Science in Hygiene or special students, may be taken into the 
laboratory and either assigned problems in connection with 
the general co-ordinated plan of investigation being pursued 
in the department, or aided and directed in the development 
of their own problems. The general lines along which 
research may profitably be undertaken in the department are : 
higher statistical theory, analytical studies on human vital 
statistics, genetic and other biological factors influencing the 
duration of life, the study by modern statistical methods of 
epidemiological problems. 

Additional Opportunities. There are certain opportu- 
nities for advanced students, resulting from outside connec- 
tions of the department, apart from the courses offered which 
require special mention. 

I. Investigations on Tuberculosis. By means of 
funds furnished by the National Tuberculosis Association 
there is in progress in the department an intensive investiga- 
tion of the genetic and environmental factors concerned in the 
etiology and epidemiology of tuberculosis. The investigation 
is being prosecuted by the method of intensive field study and 
pedigree analysis, along the lines which have been so fruitful 
in the general field of eugenics. The staff engaged in this 
work is as follows : 

Blanche F. Pooler, Supervisor of Field Workers. 

Alice F. Eaymond, B. S., field worker. 

Eebekah Sugar, field worker. 

Margaret Riley, field worker. 

Marian K. Gibson. A. B., field worker. 



173] Departments of Instruction 53 

This investigation affords to properly qualified students 
an opportunity for practical experience and training in eu- 
genic field work, and the analysis of the data from such work. 

II. Central Statistical Bureau of the Baltimore 
Alliance. At the beginning of the present year the Bal- 
timore Alliance, a federation of fourteen social or charitable 
agencies in the City of Baltimore, organized a new depart- 
ment of potentially far-reaching importance. It will be 
known as the Central Statistical Bureau, and will form an 
integral part of the Alliance. The functions of this Bureau 
are (1) to supervise, standardize, and control the permanent 
statistical records collected by each of the allied agencies; 
(2) to serve as the final repository of all case and statistical 
records; (3) on the basis of the critically controlled basic 
statistical records to carry on scientific investigations of those 
broad social problems toward the ultimate permanent solu- 
tion of which the activities of the Alliance are directed. 

Dr. Pearl has been appointed Director of the Central Sta- 
tistical Bureau, and Miss Magdalen H. Burger, Chief Statis- 
tician. Funds have been provided for the necessary clerical 
staff. The Bureau will be housed with the department of 
biometry and vital statistics of the School of Hygiene and 
Public Health at 625 St. Paul Street, Baltimore. 

It is to be expected that with the passage of time there will 
accumulate in this Bureau a set of records which will offer 
unique opportunities to graduate students and others wishing 
to undertake fundamental investigations into the causes of 
poverty, disease, and other social problems now retarding 
community health and happiness. 

III. Hospital Statistics. Students interested in the 
statistical aspects of the problems of clinical medicine, sur- 
gery, and pathology will be afforded an opportunity of under- 
taking research upon these problems under the direction of 
Dr. Pearl. All of the extensive collection of case histories in 
the archives of the Hospital is available for such investiga- 
tions. 



54 School of Hygiene and Public Health [174 



PUBLIC HEALTH ADMINISTRATION 

Sir Arthur Newsholme, M. D., Resident Lecturer. 

The work of the department comprises: 1. Lectures. 2. 
Conferences. 3. Demonstrations. 
In the lectures are included : 

A sketch of the history of public health administration and 
of its inter-relation with other branches of administration, 
and with the medical and nursing professions. 

Method of registration of births, sickness and death. 

Methods of procedure in remedying sanitary or housing 
defects. 

Administrative aspect of public health laboratory work. 

The prevention of the chief epidemic diseases. 

Hospital administration. 

The prevention and control of tuberculosis and of venereal 
diseases. 

Food sanitation. 

Maternity and child welfare work. 

School hygiene. 

Industrial hygiene. 

Public health nursing. 

Methods of preparing budgets. 

Conferences are held weekly, at which the subjects in- 
cluded .in the lecture course are discussed and illustrated by 
diagrams, models, etc. 

Demonstrations are given of practical work in general 
public health office administration and in methods of official 
action in regard to the control of infectious diseases, to food 
and milk, housing, nuisances, slaughter-houses, etc. ; in the 
collection and use of vital statistics and use of the Interna- 
tional Classification of causes of death. 

Visits are made to public health laboratories, to infectious 
diseases hospitals, to tuberculosis hospitals, sanatoria, and 



175] Departments of Instruction 55 

clinics, to venereal clinics, to schools, centres for maternity 
and child welfare work, and to places illustrating details in 
rural and urban sanitation, and in industrial hygiene. 

EPIDEMIOLOGY 

W. H. Frost, M. D., Surgeon, U. S. Public Health Service, 

Resident Lecturer. 
F. M. Header, M. D., Associate. 
— •, Instructor. 

The course is given in the third trimester, occupying 
eighteen hours a week 

It is designed to give students a view of the importance 
and possibilities of epidemiological study in extending the 
knowledge of infectious diseases, and to afford them training 
in methods, especially as applicable to such studies as may 
ordinarily be made in connection with administrative meas- 
ures for the control of infectious diseases, utilizing the data 
ordinarily available to public health organizations. 

The minimum requirements for admission to the course 
are a knowledge of the basic facts and principles of bacteri- 
ology, equivalent at least to what is given in the course in 
elementary bacteriology, together with sufficient knowledge 
of elementary statistical method. Subject to certain excep- 
tions, students will be admitted to this course only after com- 
pleting the required course in vital statistics. 

The wprk consists of : 

1. A course of lectures presenting the principles and 
methods of epidemiological investigation and illustrating 
their application in special research and in such current study 
of infectious diseases as is a necessary part of the work of 
administrative health organization. 

2'. A course of selected collateral reading. 

3. Class work, occupying approximately ten hours a week, 
in the analysis of crude epidemiological data, the presenta- 
tion of conclusions and the planning of investigations. 



56 School of Hygiene and Public Health [176 

4. Weekly conferences for the discussion of selected topics 
in connection with lectures, class work and collateral reading. 

5. Demonstrations, arranged through the courtesy of the 
Baltimore City and Maryland State Departments of Health, 
of the work done by these organizations and associated agen- 
cies in the study and control of infectious diseases. These 
demonstrations are supplemented by individual field work on 
the part of students in the collection of epidemiological data 
from original sources; but this work is necessarily conditional 
upon the opportunities for field work which may be presented 
at the time. 

6. The preparation, by each student, of a brief thesis on 
an assigned subject in epidemiology. 



SCHEDULES OF COURSES FOR THE 

SESSION OF 1920-1921 



SCHEDULES OF COURSES 



SCHEDULE FOR THE COURSE LEADING TO THE DEGREE 
OF DOCTOR OF PUBLIC HEALTH 

The schedule arranged for candidates for the degree of 
Doctor of Public Health will consist of a series of trimestral 
laboratory courses together with certain general and special 
lecture courses. The laboratory courses will extend in most 
cases from 9 a. m. to 4 p. m. (Saturday, 9 a. m. to 12 m.), 
and will include appropriate lectures or conferences. Each 
student will be expected to complete satisfactorily twelve 
trimestral laboratory courses, taking two such courses in each 
trimester, so that under ordinary conditions two years will 
be required to complete the work for the degree. It is under- 
stood that candidates for the degree may enter upon their 
work at the beginning of any trimester. In making up his 
twelve required laboratory courses each student will be given 
an opportunity to elect two or three of these courses in one 
department. The additional elected courses will be of a spe- 
cial or advanced character. In addition each student will be 
expected to attend the afternoon lectures during one year, and 
will be requested to show evidence of satisfactory field or 
laboratory we-rk during one summer in some approved public 
health service. 

Students taking the combined course in medicine and 
public health will be required to absolve only nine of the 
trimestral laboratory courses. The following provisional an- 
nouncement is made of the arrangement of courses for the 
session of 1920-1921 : 



179] 59 



60 School of Hygiene and Public Health l"' 1 



First or Fourth Tbimesteb (Septbmbbb 28 to Decembeb 23) 

Hours: 9 to 4; Saturdays, to 12. 

Laboratory Courses: 

Bacteriology I Monday, Wednesday, Friday. 

Protozoology Tuesday, Thursday, Saturday. 

Sanitary Engineering Monday, 11.30 to 4. Wednesday 

to 11.30. Friday. 11.30 to 12.30. 

Physiological Hygiene I Tuesday, Thursday, Saturday. 

Chemistry Monday, Wednesday, Friday. 

Statistics II Tuesday, Thursday, Saturday. 

Afternoon Lectures: 

Public Lectures Monday, 5 p. m. According to specia 

announcement. 

Public Health Administration Tuesday, 4, Sir Arthur Newsholmt 

Selected Topics in Hygiene Wednesday, 4, Dr. Welch. 

Public Health Administration 

(Conference) Friday, 4, Sir Arthur Newsholme. 

Second or Fifth Trimester (January 3 to March 19) 
Hours: 9 to 4; Saturdays, 9 to 12. 

Laboratory Courses: 

Bacteriology II Monday, Wednesday, Friday. 

Immunology I Tuesday, Thursday, Saturday. 

Statistics I Monday, Wednesday, Friday. 

Helminthology Tuesday, Thursday, Saturday. 

Afternoon Lectures: 

Public Lectures Monday, 5 p. m. According to specia 

announcement. 

Public Health Administration Tuesday, 4, Sir Arthur Newsholme. 

Selected Topics in Hygiene Wednesday, 4, Dr. Welch. 

Public Health Administration 

(Conference) Friday, 4, Sir Arthur Newsholme. 



181] Schedules of Courses 01 



Third or Sixth Trimester (March 21 to Jui\e 11) 

Hours: 9 to 4; Saturdays, 9 to 12. 

Laboratory Courses: 

Kpidemiology ... Monday, Wednesday, Friday. 

Immunology II Tuesday, Thursday, Saturday. 

Physiological Hygiene II Monday, Wednesday, Friday. 

Medical Entomology Tuesday, Thursday, Saturday. 

Parasitology Monday, Wednesday, Friday. 

Chemistry Tuesday, Thursday, Saturday. 

Statistics III Monday, Wednesday, Friday. 

Afternoon Lectures: 

Public Lectures Monday, 5 p. m. According to special 

announcement. 

Metabolism and Diet Monday, 4 p. m., Dr. McCollum. 

Metabolism and Diet Tuesday, 4 p. m., Dr. McCollum. 

Administrative Law Wednesday, 4 p. m., Dr. Willoughby. 

Mental Hygiene (Demonstration) ... Thursday, 4.30 p. m., Dr. Campbell. 

Metabolism and Diet Friday, 4 p. m., Dr. McCollum. 

Mental Hygiene (conference) Saturday, 2.30 p. m., Dr. Campbell. 



62 School of Hygiene and Public Health I ~- y 



SCHEDULE FOR THE COURSE LEADING TO THE 
DEGREE OF BACHELOR OF SCIENCE 

First Trimester (September 28 to December 23, 1920-1921) 

Hours: 9 to 4; Saturdays, 9 to 12. 

Laboratory Courses: 

Bacteriology I Monday, Wednesday, Friday. 

Anatomy Tuesday, Thursday. 

Afternoon Lectures: 

Public Lectures Monday, 5 p. m. According to special 

announcement. 

Second Trimester (Januaby 3 to March 19, 1920-1921) 

Hours: 9 to 4; Saturdays, 9 to 12. 
Laboratory Courses: 

Physiology Monday, Wednesday, Friday. 

Histology Tuesday, Thursday. 

Afternoon Lectures: 

Public Lectures Monday, 5 p. m. According to special 

announcement. 

Third Trimester (March 21 to June 11, 1920-1921) 

Hours: 9 to 4; Saturdays, 9 to 12. 

Laboratory Courses: 

Physiological Hygiene II Monday, Wednesday, Friday. 

Chemistry Tuesday, Thursday, Saturday. 

Afternoon Lectures: 

Public Lectures Monday, 5 p. m. According to special 

announcement. 
Personal Hygiene Thursday, 4 p. m. Dr. Howell. 



183] Schedules of Courses 63 



(Fourth Trimester (1921-1922) 
Hours: 9 to 4; Saturdays, 9 to 12. 

Laboratory Courses: 

Sanitary Engineering Monday, 11.30 to 4. Wednesday, 8.30 

to 11.30. Friday, 11.30 to 12.30. 
Physiological Hygiene I 
or Statistics II Tuesday, Thursday, Saturday. 

Afternoon Lectures: 

Public Lectures Monday, 5 p. m. According to special 

announcement. 

Public Health Administration Tuesday, 4, Sir Arthur Newsholme. 

Selected Topics in Hygiene Wednesday, 4, Dr. Welch. 

Fifth Trimester (1921-1922) 
Hours: 9 to 4; Saturdays, 9 to 12. 

Laboratory Courses: 

Bacteriology II or Statistics I Monday, Wednesday, Friday. 

Immunology I Tuesday, Thursday, Saturday. 

Afternoon Lectures: 

Public Lectures Monday, 5 p. m. According to special 

announcement. 

Public Health Administration Tuesday, 4, Sir Arthur Newsholme. 

Selected Topics in Hygiene Wednesday, 4, Dr. Welch. 

Sixth Trimester (1921-1922) 
Hours: 9 to 4; Saturdays, 9 to 12. 

Laboratory Courses : 

Parasitology or Epidemiology Monday, Wednesday, Friday. 

Elementary Pathology Tuesday, Thursday. 

Afternoon Lectures: 

Public Lectures Monday, 5 p. m. According to special 

announcement. 

Metabolism and Diet Monday, 4 p. m., Dr. McCollum. 

Metabolism and Diet Tuesday, 4 p. m., Dr. McCollum. 

Administrative Law Wednesday, 4 p. m., Dr. Willoughby. 

Metabolism and Diet Friday, 4 p. m., Dr. McCollum. 



04 



School of Hygiene and Public Health 



IS4 



INTENSIVE COURSE OF INSTRUCTION FOR PUBLIC 
HEALTH OFFICERS 

This course begins on Monday, November 8, and extends 
to Saturday, December 18. It is intended to meet the needs 
of public health officers wishing to increase their knowledge 
of hygiene and public health ; and of physicians proposing to 
enter into public health work who find it impracticable to 
devote a year or two years to a full course of instruction. 

The course of instruction will consist chiefly of confer- 
ences and demonstrations, supplemented by visits of inspec- 
tion to important sanitary and industrial works, to schools, 
to centers of sanitary administration and to specialized clin- 
ics and welfare centers. 

On each week day demonstrations or practical exercises will 
occupy the hours from 9 to 4, followed by a lecture on five 
days a week from 4 to 5 p. m. On two evenings a weel 
conferences on important phases of public health will be hel( 

The fee for the courses will be $50.00, payable on regis- 
tration. This fee will be remitted for those actually engagec 
in full-time health work who are suitably recommended. 



INDEX 



INDEX OF NAMES 



PAGE 

Abercrombie, A. D. S 17 

Anderson, CM 15 

Atwater, R. M 14, 15 

Bacon, A. L 13,17,50 

Bailey, C. E 16 

Bailey, G. H 15 

Baker, N. D 6 

Barrett, E. M. J 16 

Bartual-Vicens, L 13, 19, 42 

Beard, L. C 20 

Bernard, Z 17 

Boeck, W. C 14 

Boyce, W. G 6 

Brown, 0. G 15 

Bull, C. G 8, 21, 42, 43 

Burger, M 17, 53 

Burroughs, L. 17 

Caldwell, F. 17 

Campbell, C. M 61 

Cheer, S 20 

Clark, J. H 11, 47, 48 

Collinson, J 15 

Cornelius, J. T 15 

Cort, W. W 10, 45, 46 

Cox, O. R 16 

Cromwell, H ; 16 

Dean, A. S 20 

DeLamar, J. R 32 

Dorsey, A. H. E 17 

Dreyer, G 33 

Driml, K 17 

Durham, M. L 21 

Eaton, P 11, 41 

Ellicott, V. LeM 15 

Ellinger, T. U. H 17 

Emerson, C. P 35 

Finley, E. B 17 

Ford, W. W 8, 21, 41, 42 

Freeman, A. W 35 

Frost, W. H 8, 21, 55 

Fulton, J. S 9 

Gaerlan, R. Padua 15 

Gibson, M 17, 52 

Glenn, J., Jr 6 

Goodnow, F. J 7, 21 

Goodwin, W. A 17 

Corgas, W. C 34 

187] 



PAGE 

Gover, M |g 

Gregory, J. H g > 21, 43 

Griswold, B. H., Jr 6 

Hamilton, J. H is 

Harlan, H. D 6 

Hausheer, W. C ig 

Hegner, R. W 9, 21, 45 

Hogue, M. J i3 > 45 

Howard, W. T 9, 50, 51 

Howell, C 13, 18, 50, 51 

Howell, W. H 7, 21, 25, 47, 50, 62 

Hulka, J 18 

Hulse, F. E is 

Hyde, R. R 10, .42, 43 

Jones, C. H 10 

Jones, E. A 18 

Kelly, H. A 33 

Keyser, R. B 6 

Klein, D 9, 44 

Koch, M 11, 44 

Koch, M. L 17 

Koehne, M- 12, 44 

Lange, L. B 12, 41 

Leach, C. N 14 

Lee, F. S 34 

Legge, T. M 33 

Leigh, A. J ." 16 

Levering, E 6 

Levine, V. E 18 

Lichtenstein, H 18 

Lim, C. E 15 

Linthicum, E. S 18 

Lopez-Rizal, L 19 

McCollum, E. V 7, 21, 36, 44, 61 

McKinney, E. M 18 

MacDonald, M. B 18 

Macklin, M. T 13,47,50 

Magee, C. L 18 

Marburg, T 6 

Maxcy, K. F 14, 15 

Meader, F. M 11, 55 

Meader, P. D 12, 41 

Meyer, A. L 11, 47, 49 

Miner, J. R 10, 16, 50, 51 

Molloy, D. M 15 

Moore, W. C 10, 42, 43 

Nauss, R. E 15 

67 



68 



School of Hygiene and Public Health [188 



PACE 

Neuhausen, B. S 20 

Newsholme, A... 8, 21, 33, 34, 54, 

60, 63 

Nicholls, E. E 17 

Norris, E 21 

Oldt, F 15 

Oppenheimer, E. H 17 

Osborn, I. S 34 

Padua-tGaerlan, R 15 

Parker, S. L 11, 50, 51 

Parsons, H. T 11, 44 

Payne, F. K 18 

Payne, G. C 15 

Pearl, R 8, 21, 50, 51, 52, 53 

Petritz, L. J 18 

Pfeiffer, J. A. F 16 

Phillips, A. G 12, 18, 50 

Pitlik, S 16 

Pooler, B 18, 52 

Powdermaker, F 13, 18, 44 

Powell, H. M 19 

Pritchett, I. W 13, 16, 42 

Randall, B 6 

Raymond, A 19, 52 

Reed, L. J 9, 21, 50, 51 

Riley, M. 1 19, 52 

Riley, R. H 19 

Rivas-Vides, R 19 

Rizal, L. Lopez 19 

Robinson, G. H 10, 21, 41 

Root, F. If 12, 45, 46 

Rose, W 25 

Rutherford, C. E 12, 50, 51 

Salmon, T. W 35 

Salter, R. C 13, 16. 41 



Schtlltze, E. \Y ]9 

Shelling, D. H 17 

Simmond*, N 12, 4 4 

Simon, C. E 13 

Slemons, J. M 35 

Smith, H. W 13, 16, 47 

Smith, O. C 19 

Snow, W. F 34 

Snyder, J. C 17 

Soper, F. L 19 

Souza, G. H. deP 16 

Spaeth, R. A 10, 21, 47, 48 

Starkey, T. A 35 

Sugar, R 19, 52 

Sutton, F. D 20 

Taliaferro, W. H 12, 45 

Thies, E. S 19 

Tumbleson, C. C 19 

Van Winkle, C. C 2o 

Yaughan, V. C 34 

Veiller, L 33 

Vicens, L. Bartual 13, 19, 42 

Vides, R. Rivas 19 

Vieira, F. B 16 

Visher, J. W 19 

Visscher, J. P 20 

Wassell, C. McA 19 

Welch, W. H 7, 21, 25, 60, 63 

White, M. Jr 6 

Willard, D 6 

Williams, J. W 35 

Willoughby. W. W 61, 63 

Wood, F. W 6 

Yeager, C. H 19 

Yokogawa, S 13 



INDEX 



PAGE 

Admission, Requirements for 

27, 29, 30, 31 

Advisory Board of the Faculty. ... 21 

Applications, Committee on 21 

Artist 21 

Assistant Director 7, 21, 26 

Assistants 12 

Associates 10 

Associate Professors 8 

Announcement of Courses, Depart- 
ments of Instruction and, 

Bacteriology 41 

Biometry and Vital Statistics, 50 

Chemical Hygiene 44 

Epidemiology 55 

Immunology, 42 

Medical Zoology 45 

Physiological Hygiene 47 

Public Health Administration, 54 

Sanitary Engineering 43 

Special Students 32 

Intensive 64 

Bachelor of Science in Hygiene, 

Candidates for degree of . . . . 16 

Course leading to degree of.. 30 

Schedule for course 62 

Bacteriology, Course in 41 

Biometry and Vital Statistics, 

Course in 50 

Board of Trustees 6 

Advisory, of the Faculty 21 

Calendar 5 

Registration and 37 

Candidates for degree of Doctor of 

Public Health 15 

Doctor of Science in Hygiene, 16 
Bachelor of Science in Hy- 
giene 16 

Certificate in Public Health, Course 

leading to 31 

Chemical Hygiene, Course in 44 

Committee, Executive 21 

Library 21 

On Applications 21 

On Publications 21 

Contents 3 

189] 



PAGE 

Courses, 

Doctor of Public Health 27 

Doctor of Science in Hygiene, 29 
Bachelor of Science in Hy- 
giene SO 

Certificate in Public Health.. 31 

Special Students 32 

Intensive, Schedules of 59, 64 

Degrees, Candidates for 

Doctor of Public Health. 15 

Doctor of Science in Hygiene, 16 
Bachelor of Science in Hy- 
giene 16 

De Lamar Lectures in Hygiene. ... 32 

Departments of Instruction and 
Announcement of Courses, 

Bacteriology 41 

Biometry and Vital Statistics, 50 

Chemical Hygiene 44 

Epidemiology 55 

Immunology 42 

Medical Zoology 45 

Physiological Hygiene 47 

Public Health Administration, 54 

Sanitary Engineering 43 

Special Students 32 

Intensive 64 

Director 7, 21, 26 

Assistant 7, 21, 26 

Doctor of Public Health, 

Candidates for degree of 15 

Course leading to degree of . . . 27 

Schedule for course 60 

Doctor of Science in Hygiene, Can- 
didates for degree of 16 

Course leading to degree of.. 29 

Epidemiology, Course in 55 

Executive Committee 21 

Faculty 7 

Advisory Board of the 21 

Fellows 13 

By Courtesy 13 

Fellowships 36 

General Statement 25 

Health Officers, Intensive Course for 64 

69 



70 



School of Hygiene and Public Health 190 



PAGE 

Immunology, Course in 42 

Instruction and Announcement of 
Courses, Departments of, 

Bacteriology 41 

Biometry and Vital Statistics, 50 

Chemical Hygiene 44 

Epidemiology 55 

Immunology 42 

Medical Zoology 45 

Physiological Hygiene 47 

Public Health Administration, 54 

Sanitary Engineering 43 

Special Students 32 

Intensive 04 

Instructors 11 

Intensive Course of Instruction for 

Puiblic Health Officers 64 

Lecturers 9 

Lectures, De Lamar 32 

School Hygiene 36 

Library Committee 21 

Librarian 21 

Medical Zoology, Course in 45 

Officers 21 

Physiological Hygiene, Course in . . 4V 

President of the University 6, 7, 21 

Professors 7 

Associate 8 

Public Health, 

Course leading to Certificate in 31 
Public Health Administration, 

Course in 54 



PAGB 

Publii Health Ofl i 

Intensive Course for 64 

Public Lectures 32 

Publications, Committee on 2] 

Requirements for Admission 

27, 29, 30, 31 

Registration and Calendar 37 

Rockefeller Foundation Scholars.. 14 

Sanitary Engineering, Course in . . 43 
Schedules of Courses, 

Doctor of Public Health :,u 

Bachelor of Science in Hy- 
giene 62 

Scholars, Rockefeller Foundation . . 14 

Scholarships 36 

School Hygiene, Course in 36 

Secretary 21 

Special Students, Courses for 82 

List of 17 

Statement, General 25 

Statistics, Course in Biometry and 

Vital s 50 

Students, 1919-1920 15 

Special 17 

Summary of Students 20 

Treasurer of the University 6 

Trustees, Board of 6 

Tuition 37 

Universit3 r , President of 6 

Treasurer of 6 

Trustees of 6 

Zoology, Course in Medical 45 



iwZ-Vo/ 



*?- 



cw Saries, 1921 Whole Number 330 

No. 2 



THE 

JOHNS HOPKINS 
UNIVERSITY CIRCULAR 



SCHOOL OF HYGIENE AND 
PUBLIC HEALTH 

CATALOGUE AND ANNOUNCEMENT 
FOR 1921-1922 



Baltimore, Maryland 

Published by the University 

Issued Mabch, Apbil, June, July, October, November 



APRIL, 1921 



Entered, October 21, 1903, at Baltimore, Md., as second claaa matter, under 
Act of Congress of July 18, 1894 

Acceptance for mailing at special rate of postage provided for in Section 1108 
Act of October 8, 1917. Authorized on July 8, 1918 



ran 



THE 

JOHNS HOPKINS UNIVERSITY 

SCHOOL OF HYGIENE AND 
PUBLIC HEALTH 

CATALOGUE AND ANNOUNCEMENT 
FOR 1921-1922 




Baltimore 

The Johns Hopkins Press 

1921 



CONTENTS 



PACE 

Calendar 5 

Trustees of the Johns Hopkins University 6 

Treasurer of the University 6 

Faculty 7 

Fellows 14 

Rockefeller Foundation Scholars 14 

Students 15 

Summary 23 

Advisory Board of the Faculty 24 

Executive Committee 24 

Committee on Applications 24 

Committee on Publications. 24 

Library Committee 24 

Other Officers 24 

General Statement and Requirements for Admission: 

General Statement 27 

Courses and Degrees: 

Doctor of Public Health 29 

Doctor of Science in Hygiene 30 

Bachelor of Science in Hygiene 31 

Certificate in Public Health 32 

Intensive Course for Public Health Officers 33 

Special Students 33 

The De Lamar Lectures in Hygiene 34 

Public Lectures 34 

Course in School Hygiene 37 

Scholarships 37 

Fellowships 37 

Publications 38 

Registration and Calendar 38 

Tuition 39 

Departments of Instruction and Announcements of Courses: 

Bacteriology 43 

Immunology • • 44 

Sanitary Engineering 40 

Chemical Hygiene 46 

Medical Zoology 48 

Physiological Hygiene 51 

Biometry and Vital Statistics 54 

Public Health Administration 57 

Epidemiology 58 

Schedules of Courses for the Season of 1921-1922 : 

Doctor of Public Health 63 

Bachelor of Science in Hygiene • cfi 

Certificate in Public Health ^ 

Intensive Course for Public Health Officers 69 

Alphabetical Index of Names 73 

Index 75 

3 



1921 



JANUARY 

^TmTtTwitTi^ 
-I— I— I— I— - 



41 6 
11 12 
18 19 
25 26 



FEBRUARY 



13 



M|T|W|T|FIS 



.. 1 

71 8 

14115 

20l21|22 23 

27|28|..|.. 



MARCH 

S M T|W|T | FIS 



I - - * - - 1 



APRIL 

S M T|W|T | FIS 



MAY 



SIM 



T W|T|F 



,1UNE 



S|M T|W|T|FIS 



AUGUST 

S'M T|W|T|F S 



21 3 
9 10 
16 17 
23 24 
30 31 



5 
12 1: 
19 20 
26127 



SEPTEMBER 



S|M TIW|T|F 



OCTOBER 



R M T|W|T|FIS 



I 30131 



26 27 



NOVEMBER 

s1mTt~w|t I F s 



6 7 
13|14 
20121 

27 28 



DECEMBER 



MIT|W|T|F|g 



12 13 
19 20 
26127 



1922 



JANUARY 



S |M 



FEBRUARY 



S|M1T|W|TJFIS_ 



MARCH 



S |M T|W|T 



F|S 



APRIL 



S IM 



T|W|T IF 



28 29 



MAY 



S |M 



W|T |F 



JUNE 



18H9 
25126 



i|W|T|FIS 



JULY 



S|M 



30 



W!T | F 



AUGUST 



S 1M T|W|T 



FIS 



SEPTEMBER 

~s!m~1mw|tTf~T 



OCTOBER 



T|W|T|F| S 



4 5 
11 12 
18 19 
25 26 



61 7 
13 14 

20 21 
27 28 



J^OVEMBER 

s |M t^wItTfTs" 



DECE^IBER 



S M|TIW|T|F 



CALENDAR, 1921-1922 



1921 

June 21, Tuesday — Conferring of degrees (4 p. m.). 

October 4, Tuesday — Instruction begins. iFourth academic year. 

Xovember 24, Thursday- — Thanksgiving Day (all classes sus- 
pended ) . 

December 23, Friday — Christmas recess begins (no classes). 

1922 

January 3, Tuesday — Instruction resumed. 

February 22, Wednesday — Commemoration Day. Public exercises 
at 11 a. m. (All classes suspended). 

April 13, Thursday — Easter recess begins (no classes). 

April 20, Thursday — Instruction resumed. 

June 20, Tuesday — 'Conferring of degrees (4 p. m.). 

October 3, Tuesday — Instruction begins. Fifth academic year. 



BOARD OF TRUSTEES 



R. Brent Keyser, President 
Eugene Levering 
Theodore Marburg. 
Blanchard Randall 
Henry D. Harlan, Secretary 
Miles White, Jr. 



B. Howell Griswold, Jr. 
John Glenn, Jr. 
Frederick \V. Wood 
Daniel Willard 
Newton D. Baker 
J. Hall Pleasants 



The President of the University, ex officio 



W. Graham Boyce, Treasurer 



FACULTY 



FRANK JOHNSON" GOODNOW, LL. D. 

President of the University 

A. B., Amherst College, 1879, and A. M., 1887 ; LL. B., Columbia University, 1882 ; 
LL. D., Amherst College, 1897, Columbia University, 1904, Harvard University, 
1909, Brown University, 1914, Princeton University, 1917 ; Professor of Admin- 
istrative Law, Columbia University, 1887-1914. 

6 W. Madison St. 

WILLIAM HENRY WELCH, M. D., LL. D. 

Director and Head of the Department of Bacteriology and 

Immunology 

A. B., Yale University, 1870 ; M. D., Columbia University (College of Physicians 
and Surgeons, N. Y.), 1875; M. D. (Hon.), University of Pennsylvania, 1894; 
LL. D., Western Reserve University, 1894, Yale University, 1896, Harvard 
University, 1900, University of Toronto, 1903, Columbia University, 1904, Jeffer- 
son Medical College, 1907, Princeton University, 1910, Washington University, 
1915, and University of Chicago, 1916 ; Professor of Pathological Anatomy and 
General Pathology in the Bellevue Hospital Medical Cbllege, N. Y.. 1879-1884 ; 
Pathologist to the Johns Hopkins Hospital and Baxley Professor of Pathologv, 
1884-1917; Dean of the Medical Faculty, 1889-1898; President of the National 
Academy of Sciences, 1913-1917 ; President of the Board of Directors of the 
Rockefeller Institute for Medical Research ; President of the American Association 
for the Advancement of Science, 1906 ; President of the American Meclical Asso- 
ciation, 1910-1911 ; Member of the American Philosophical Society. 

807 St. Paul St. 

WILLIAM HENRY HOWELL, Ph.D., M. D., Sc. D., LL. D. 

Assistant Director and Professor of Physiology 

A. B., Johns Hopkins University, 1881, Fellow, 1882-1884. and Ph. D.. 1884 ; LL.D., 
Trinity College (Conn.), 1901; Sc. D., Yale University, 1911; M. D. (Hon.), 
University of Michigan, 1890, LL. D., 1912 ; LL. D., Washington University, 
1915 ; Assistant, Associate and Associate Professor of Biology, Johns Hopkins 
University, 1884-1889 ; Lecturer and Professor of Physiology and Histology, 
University of Michigan, 1889-1892 : Associate Professor of Physiology, Harvard 
University, 1892-1893 ; Member of the National Academy of Sciences and of the 
American Philosophical Society ; Dean of the Medical Faculty, 1899-1911 ; 
Professor of Physiology, Medical School, 1893-1920. 

232 W. Lanvale St. 

ELMER VERNER MoCOLLUM, Ph. D., Sc. D. 

Professor of Bio-Chemistry 

A. B., University of Kansas, 1903. and A. M., 1904 ; Loomis Fellow, Yale Univer- 
sity, 1905-1906, and Ph.D., 1906; Sc. D., University of Cincinnati, 1920; 
Instructor, Assistant Professor, Associate Professor and Professor of Agricultural 
Chemistry, University of Wisconsin, 1907-1917 ; Cutter Lecturer on Hygiene and 
Preventive Medicine, Harvard University, 1917-1918 ; Member of the National 
Academy of Sciences; Associate Member Royal Academy of Medicine of Belgium; 
Associate Editor, Journal of Biological Chemistry and Journal of Dental Research. 

Talbot Rd., Windsor Hills. 



31] 



8 School of Hygiene and Public Health [32 

RAYMOND PEARL, Ph.D., Sc. D., LL. D. 

Professor of Biometry and Vital Statistics 

A. B., Dartmouth College, 1899 ; Ph. D., University of Michigan, 1902 ; Sc. D., 
Dartmouth College, 1919; LL. D., University of Maine, 1919; Instructor in 
Zoology, University of Michigan, 1902-1906 ; in the University of Pennsylvania, 
1906-1907 ; Biologist of the Maine Agricultural Experiment Station, 1907-1917 ; 
Chief of the Statistical Division of the United States Food Administration, 
1917-1919 ; Member of the National Academy of Sciences and of the American 
Philosophical Society ; Fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences ; 
Knight of the Crown of Italy ; Associate Editor of Genetics and of the Journal of 
Experimental Zoology; Chairman of the Editorial Board of the Proceeding ot 
the National Academy of Sciences ; Statistician of The Johns Hopkins Hospital. 

401 Hawthorn Rd., Roland Park. 

JOHN HERBERT GREGORY, S. B. 

Professor of Civil and Sanitary Engineering 

S. B., Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 1895, Hydraulic and Sanitary Engi- 
neer, 1895-1911, Consulting Sanitary Engineer, 1911 — ; Member American 
Society of Civil Engineers ; Associate Professor of Oivil Engineering, Johns 
Hopkins University, 1919-1920. 

3925 Canterbury Rd., Guilford. 

SIR ARTHUR NEWSHOLME, M. D. 

Resident Lecturer in Charge of Public Health Administration 

Knight Commander of the Bath (K. C. B.) ; M. D., University of London. 1881, and 
Certificate of Public Health, 1885 ; Medical Officer of Health, Clapham, 1885- 
1888; Medical Officer of Health, Brighton, 1889-1907; Milroy Lecturer, Royal 
College of Physicians, 1S95 ; Fellow, Royal College of Physicians, 1898 ; Principal 
Medical Officer Local Government Board of England, 1908-1919 ; President, 
Society of Medical Officers of Health, 1900-1901 ; President, Epidemiological 
Society, 1907-1908 ; Member of Royal Commission on Venereal Diseases, of 
Army Sanitary Committee and of Interdepartmental Committees on Tuberculosis 
and on Dental Registration ; Lieut. Col. R. A. M. C. (T) ; Member of Council of 
Imperial Cancer Fund ; Crown Nominee General Medical Council, 1909-1919. 

312 W. Monument St. 

WADE HAMPTON -FROST, M. D., Surgeon, U. S. P. H. S.* 

Resident Lecturer in Charge of Epidemiology 

A. B., University of Virginia, 1901, and M. D., 1903; Assistant Surgeon and 
Surgeon, United States Public Health Service, 1905- ; Director, Bureau of 
Sanitary Service, American Red Cross, 1917. 

3820 Roland Av. 



ASSOCIATE PROFESSORS 

WILLIAM WEBBER FORD, M. D., D. P. H. 
Associate Professor of Bacteriology 
A. B., Adelbert College, 1893 ; M. D., Johns Hopkins University, 1898, Instructor, 
Associate, and Associate Professor of Bacteriology, 1904-1910. Associate Professor 
of Bacteriology and Hygiene, 1910-1917 ; D. P. H., McGill University, 1900, and 
Fellow in Pathology, 1899-1901 ; Resident House Officer, Johns Hopkins Hospital, 
1898-1899 ; Fellow, Rockefeller Institute for Medical Research. 1901-1902 ; Insti- 
tute for Infectious Diseases, Berlin, 1901-1902, and Johns Hopkins University, 
1902-1903 ; Hygienic Institute, University of Vienna, 1912-1913 ; Lecturer on 
Hygiene and Epidemiology, Johns Hopkins University, 1917 — . 

Charles St. Av.. Woodbrook. 



* Detailed to the School of Hygiene and Public Health by the Surgeon- General 
of the United States Public Health Service. 



33] Faculty 



CARROLL GIDEON BULL, M. D. 

Associate Professor of Immunology 

S. B., Peabody College, 1907 ; M. D., University of Nashville, 1909 ; Pathologist to 
Lincoln Memorial Hospital, 1910-1912; Assistant, Nelson Morris Institute for 
Medical Research, 1912-1913 ; Assistant and Associate in Pathology and Bacte- 
riology, The Rockefeller Institute for Medical Research, 1913-1917. 

Montgomery Road, Windsor Hills 

LOWELL JACOB REED, Ph.D. 

Associate Professor of Biometry and Vital Statistics 

S. B. and S. M., University of Maine, 1907 and 1912, Ph. D., University of Penn- 
sylvania, 1915 ; Assistant Professor of Mathematics, University of Maine, 1915- 
1917 ; Director of Bureau of Tabulation and Statistics, War Trade Board, Wash- 
ington, 1917-191S ; Associate in Biometry and Vital Statistics, Johns Hopkins 
University, 1918-1919. 

3409 Duvall Av., Forest Park. 

ROBERT WILLIAM HEGNER, Ph.D. 

Associate Professor of Protozoology 

S. B. and S. M., University of Chicago, 1903 and 1904; Ph.D., University of 
Wisconsin, 1908; Instructor, University of Michigan, 190S-1910, and Assistant 
Professor, 1910-1917 ; Johnston Scholar, Johns Hopkins University, 1917-1918 ; 
Associate in Protozoologv, 1918-1919. 

218 Hawthorn Rd., Roland Park. 

WILLIAM WALTER CORT, Ph.D. 

Associate Professor of Helminthology 

A. B., Colorado College. 1909; A.M. and Ph.D., University of Illinois, 1911 and 
1914 ; Professor of Biology, Macalester College, 1914-1916 ; Assistant Professor 
of Zoology, University of California, 1916-1919 ; Consulting Helminthologist, 
State Board of Health. California, 1918-1919; Associate in Helminthology, Johns 
Hopkins University, 1919-1920. 

3608 Woodbine Av., West Forest Park. 



LECTURERS 

WILLIAM TRAVIS HOWARD, M. D. 

Lecturer in Biometry and Vital Statistics 

M. D., University of Maryland, 1889 ; Graduate Student, Johns Hopkins University, 
18S9-1894 ; University of Prague, 1895; University of Munich, 1906-1907 and 
1911 ; Professor of Pathology, Western Reserve University ; Pathologist to the 
Lakeside and City Hospitals, Cleveland, 1894-1914 : Bacteriologist Cleveland 
Board of Health, 1902-1914 ; Assistant Commissioner of Health, Baltimore, 1915 
1919. 

835 University Parkway. 

JOHN SAMUEL FULTON, M. D. 

Lecturer in Public Health 

A. B., St. Johns College, 1S76 ; M. D., University of Maryland, 1881 ; Secretary 
State Board of Health, 1898-1907 ; and since 1912 ; Profr-ssor of State Mr-'n - - 
University of Maryland, 1900-1918 ; Secretary-General Fifth International Con- 
gress on Tuberculosis, 1908 ; Secretary-General Fifteenth International Congress 
on Hygiene and Demography. 1912 ; Fellow Royal Society of Physicians of 
Hungary; Lieut.-Col. M. R. C, U. S. Army, Retired. 

2211 St. Paul St. 



10 School of Hygiene and Public Health [34 

CHARLES HAMPSON JONES, M. D. 

Lecturer in Public Health 

M. B., C. M., University of Edinborough, 1883 ; M. D. (Hon.), College of Physicians 
and Surgeons, Baltimore, 1889; Commissioner of Health, Baltimore, 1898-1900; 
Assistant Commissioner, 1900-1915 ; Chief of Bureau of Communicable Diseases, 
State Department of Health, 1915 ; Commissioner of Health, Baltimore, 1919 ; 
Professor of Hygiene and Preventive Medicine, University of Maryland and 
College of Physicians and Surgeons. 

2529 St. Paul St. 

CHARLES EDMUND SIMON, M. D. 

Lecturer in Medical Zoology 

A. B., Johns Hopkins University, 1888 ; M. D., University of Maryland, 1890 : 
Professor of Clinical Pathology, University of Maryland and College of Physi- 
cians and Surgeons, 1908-1920 ; Fellow by Courtesy, Johns Hopkins University, 
1919-1920. 

1734 Linden Ave 

WILLIAM FREEMAN SNOW, M. D. 

Lecturer in Venereal Diseases 

A. B.,A. M., and M. D., Stanford University, 1896-1897 and 1900; Instructor in 
iBiology and Physiological Optics, Cooper Medical College, 1898-1900 ; Assistant 
Professor and Associate Professor of Hygiene, Stanford University, 1902-1906 ; 
Professor of Hygiene and Public Health, 1909-1920 ; State Health Commissioner 
of California, 1909-1913 ; General Director, American Social Hvgiene Association, 
1914—. 

370 Seventh Ave., New York. 



ASSOCIATES 

GEORGE HENRY ROBINSON, Ph.D. 

Associate in Bacteriology 

A B., Bates College, 1911 ; A. M., Brown University, 1912, and Ph. D., 1914 : 
Research Laboratory, H. K. Mulford Company, 1914-1918. 

3818 Barrington Road. 

REYNOLD ALBRECHT SPAETH, Ph.D. 

Associate in Physiology 

S. B., Haverford College, 1909 ; A. M., Harvard University, 1910, and Ph. D., 1913 ; 
Sheldon Fellow, Physiological Institute, Kiel, 1913-1914 ; Instructor in Biology, 
Clark College, 1914-1915, and Yale University, 1915-1918 ; Technical Assistant in 
Pharmacology, Hygienic Laboratory, U. S. Public Health Service, 1918. 

212 Longwood Rd., Roland Park 

JOHN RICE MINER, A. B. 

Associate in Biometry and Vital Statistics 

A. 15., University of Michigan, 1913 ; Computer, Maine Agricultural Experiment 
Station, 1913-1917 ; Biometrician, Statistical Division, U. S. Food Administra- 
tion, 1917-1918. 

Towson. Md. 



35] Faculty ll 

ROSCOE RAYMOND HYDE, Ph.D. 

Associate in Immunology 

A. B. and A. M., Indiana University, 1909 ; Ph. D., Columbia University, 1915 ; 
Assistant in Embryology, Indiana University, 1908-1909 ; Assistant Professor, 
Professor and Head of Department of Zoology and Physiology, Indiana State 
Normal School, 1909-1919 ; Lecturer in Genetics, Terre Haute Veterinary College, 
1910-1918 ; Dyckman Fellow, Columbia University, 1912-1913 ; Fellow, Johns 
Hopkins University, 1918-1919. 

4101 Penhurst Av. 

ARTHUR LOUIS MEYER, M. D. 

Associate in Physiology 

A. B., Beloit College, 1905 ; M. D., University of Pennsylvania, 1909 ; Harvard 
Medical School, 1912-1913 ; Oxford University and Cambridge University, 1913 ; 
Assistant, Russell Sage Institute of Pathology, 1914-1915 ; Assistant and Associate, 
Rockefeller Institute for Medical Research, 1915-1919. 

1109 St. Paul St. 

MATHILDE KOCH, S. M. 

Associate in Bio-Chemistry 

S. B., University of Chicago, 1910, and S. M., 1912 ; Research Assistant in Bio- 
Chemistry, 1910-1914; Special Expert, Hygienic Laboratory, United States Public 
Health Service, 1914-1915 ; Assistant in Chemistry, Psychiatric Institute, New 
York State Hospital, 1915-1920, and Acting Assistant in Serology, 1918-1920. 

2710, N. Charles St. 
JANET HOWELL CLARK, Ph.D. 
Associate in Physiology 

A. B., Bryn Mawr College, 1910 ; A. M., Johns Hopkins University, 1912, and Ph. D., 
1913 ; Huff Fellow, Bryn Mawr College, 1913-1914, and instructor in Physics, 
1914-1915 ; Sarah Berliner Fellow, 1915-1916 ; Instructor, Smith College, 1916- 
1917 ; Assistant in Pathology, Johns Hopkins University, 1917-1918 ; Instructor 
in Physiology, 1918-1919. 

232 W. Lanvale St. 

WILLIAM HAY TALIAFERRO, Ph.D. 

Associate in Protozoology 

S. B., University of Virginia, 1915 ; Assistant in Biology, Johns Hopkins Univer- 
sity, 1915-1917 : Adam T. Bruce Fellow, 1917-1918 ; Ph. D., 1918 ; Johnston 
Scholar, 1919 ; Instructor in Protozoology, 1919-1920. 

1824 Bolton St. 

FRANCIS METCALF ROOT, Ph.D. 

Associate in Medical Entomology 
A. B., Oberlin College, 1911, A. M., 1912 ; Graduate Student, Johns Hopkins Univer- 
sity, 1912-1914, University Fellow, 1914-1915 ; Adam T. Bruce Fellow, 1915- 
1917, Ph. D., 1917 ; Teaching Fellow in Medical Entomology, 1919-1920. 

2320 Callow Av. 

NINA SIMMONDS, S. B. 
Associate in Bio-Chemistry 
S. B., University of Wisconsin, 1915, Assistant in Agricultural Chemistry, 1915- 
1917 ; Assistant and Instructor in Bio-Chemistry, Johns Hopkins University, 
1917-1920. 

511 N. Wolfe St. 



1*2 School of Hygiene and Public* Health 36 

ALFRED THEODORE SI 101 1 L. M. D. 
Associate in Bio-Chemistry 

A. B. and M. D., Harvard Universitv, 1910 and 1914; Assistant in Urology, Johns 
Hopkins University, 1917-1920. 

3909 Dalrymple Ave. 

LEON CLIVE HAVENS, M.D. 

Associate in Immunology 

A. B. and A. M., Colorado College, 1913 and 1914 ; M. D., Harvard University, 
1918. 

4008 Edmondson Ave. 

MILTON VICTOR VELDEE. M.I). 
Associate in Epidemiology 

Pli. C, S. B. and S. M., University of Washington, 1911, 1913 and 1914; Y. D., 



Harvard University, 1919. 



2710 N. Charles St. 



INSTRUCTORS 



SYLVIA LOUISE PARKER, A. B. 

Instructor in Biometry and Vital Statistics 

A. B., Mount Holyoke College, 1916, and Laboratory Assistant in Zoology. 1916- 
1917 ; Assistant Biologist, Maine Agricultural Experiment Station, 1917-1918. 

3409 Duvall Ave.. Forest Park 

PERCY DAVOL HEADER, Ph.D. 
Instructor in Bacteriology 

Ph. B., Sc. M. and Ph.D., Brown University, 1914, 1916 and 1918; Assistant 
Bacteriologist, Providence Health Department, 1916-1918 ; Assistant. Johns 
Hopkins University, 1918. 

813 N. Howard St. 

LINDA BARTELS LANGE, M. D. 

Instructor in Bacteriology 

A. B., Bryn Mawr College, 1903 ; M. D., Johns Hopkins University, 1911 ; Interne, 
New York Infirmary for Women and Children, 1911-1912 ; Fellow in Pathology 
and Bacteriology, Kockefeller Institute for Medical Research, 1912-1914 ; Pathol- 
ogist, Howard A. Kelly Hospital, Inc., 1914-1915 ; Instructor in Pathology, 
University of Wisconsin, 1915-1916 ; Assistant and Instructor in Medicine, Johns 
Hopkins University, 1916-1918 ; Fellow in Bacteriology, 1918-1919. 

804 N. Broadway 

WILLIAM THURBER FALES, S. B.. C. P. H. 

Instructor in Epidemiology 

S. B., Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 1917 ; C. P. H., School of Public 
Health of Harvard University and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. 1920. 

293S Clifton Av. 

ERNEST JOSEPH CAULFIELD, M. D. 

Instructor in Physiology 
S. B., Trinity College, 1916; M. D., Johns Hopkins University, 1920. 

1220 N. Broadwav 



37] Faculty 13 



ASSISTANTS 

AMY GEORGINA PHILLIPS 

Assistant in Biometry and Vital Statistics 

312 W. Monument St. 

CHESTER EARL RUTHERFORD 

Assistant in Biometry and Vital Statistics 

1524 Ellamont St. 

CHARMIAN HOWELL, S. B. 

Assistant in Biometry and Vital Statistics 
S. B., Oakcliffe College, 1903. 

421 E. Biddle St. 

AGNES LATIMER BACON", A. B. 

Volunteer Assistant in Biometry and Vital Statistics 
A. B., Wellesley College, 1897. 

2316 N. Calvert St. 

ETHEL MAY KINNEY, A. M. 

Assistant in Bio-Chemistry 

A. B. and A. M.. University of Kansas, 1918 and 1920 ; Research Assistant, 
University of Wyoming, 1918-1919 ; Fellow, University of Kansas, 1919-1920. 

101 Jackson Place 

MADELINE SPENCER KING, A. B. 

Assistant in Bio-Chemistry 
A. B.. Goucher College, 1920. 

35 E. 25th St, 

DONALD LESLIE AUGUSTINE, S. B. 

Assistant in Medical Zoology 
S. B., Macalester College, 1918, and Adjunct Professor of Biology, 1919-1920. 

1720 Linden Ave. 

ELERY RONALD BECKER, A. B. 

Assistant in Medical Zoology 
A. B., University of Colorado, 1920. 

1720 Linden Ave. 

RAYMOND CLEVELAND SALTER, Sc. D. 

Assistant in Bacteriology 
S. B., University of Wisconsin, 1915; S.lM., Iowa State College, 1918; Fellow, 
Johns Hopkins University, 1919-1920, and Sc. D. in Hygiene, 1920 ; Chief, 
Bureau of Bacteriology, Maryland State Department of Health, 1920 — . 

2319 Callow Ave. 



14 School of Hygiene mid Public Health [38 



FELLOWS BY COURTESY 

JAMBS EDWARD ACKERT, Ph. D. 

A. B., A. M. and Ph. D., University of Illinois, 1909, 1911 and 1913 ; Professor of 
Zoology, Kansas State Agricultural College, 1918 — . 

9 W. Preston St. 

SADAMU YOKAGAWA, M. D. 

M. D., College of Okayama 1908 ; M. D., University of Kyoto, 1917 ; Professor 
of Pathology, Medical College, Taiwan, Formosa, llclminiholoyy. 

FELLOWS 
Juanita Elizabeth Darrah. Ivesdale, 111. 2635 N.Calvert St. 

A. B. and S. M., University of Illinois, 1913 and 1915 ; A. M., Columbia Uni- 
versity, 1917. Bio-Chemistry. 

Mary Jane Hogue. West Chester, Pa. 821 N. Charles St. 

A. B., Goucher College, 1905; Ph.D., University of Wurzburg, 1909. 

Protozoology. 

Ida Williams Pritchett. Baltimore, Md. Homewood Apts. 

A. B., Bryn Mawr College, 1914. Immunology. 

* Alice Raymond. Leominster, Mass. 312 W. Monument St. 

A. B., Middlebury College, 1910. Statistics. 

Homer William Smith. Denver, Colo. 35 E. 25th St. 

A. B., University of Denver, 1917. Physiology. 

(5) 

ROCKEFELLER FOUNDATION SCHOLARS 
Reginald Myers Atwater. Colorado Springs, Colo. 

A. B., Colorado College, 1914 ; M. D., Harvard University, 1918 ; C. P. H., 
Johns Hopkins University, 1920. 

2755 W. North Av. 
Garland Howard Bailey. Giatto, W. Va. 1512 N. Caroline St. 

S. B., West Virginia University, 1915 ; M. D., Johns Hopkins University, 
1920. 

f William Charles Boeck. Olivia, Minn. 

S. B., Carleton College, 1915 ; A. M., and Ph. D., University of California. 
1916, and 1918. 

Charles Nelson Leach. New York City. 1109 St. Paul St. 

A. B. and M. D., Stanford University, 1909 and 1913. 

Kenneth Fuller Maxcy. Baltimore, Md. 905 Cathedral St. 

A. B., George Washington University, 1911 ; M. D., Johns Hopkins Univer- 
sity, 1915. 

Norman Rudolph Stoll. Detroit, Mich. 27 E. Mt. Vernon PI. 

S. B., Mount Union College, 1915 ; S. M., University of Michigan, 1918. 

John Joseph Szymanski. Passaic, N. J. 715 St. Paul St. 

A. B., St. John's College (Brooklyn), 1910; M. D., Johns Hopkins Univer- 
sity, 1914. 

(7) 

* Resigned March 1, 1921. 

t Resigned September 20, 1920. 



STUDENTS, 1920-1921 



CANDIDATES FOR THE DEGREE OF DOCTOR OF PUBLIC HEALTH 

RUFINO Abriol. Manila, P. I. Fort McEenry, Baltimore. 

M. D., University of Illinois, 1913 ; D. T. M., University of the Philippine* 
1916. 

Reginald Myers Atwater. Colorado Springs, Colo. 

A. B„ Colorado College, 1914; M. D., Harvard University, 1918; C. P. H.. 
Johns Hopkins University, 1920 ; Rockefeller Foundation Scholar. 

2755 W. North Av. 
Garland Howard Bailey. Giatto, W. Va. 1512 N. Caroline St. 

S. B., West Virginia University, 1915; M. D., Johns Hopkins University, 
1920 ; Rockefeller Foundation Scholar. 

Orville Graham Brown. Washington, D. C. 1 E. 21st St. 

M. D., Columbia University, 1900 ; Lieut.-Col., Medical Corps, U. S. A. 

John Collinson. Baltimore, Md. 16 W. Saratoga St. 

A. B., St. John's College, 1907 ; M. D., Johns Hopkins University, 1911. 

James Angus Doull. New Glasgow, Nova Scotia. 

A. B. and M. D. C. M., Dalhousie University, 1911 and 1914 ; D. P. H., Uni- 
versity of Cambridge, 1919. 

12 E. Biddle St. 

George Clark Dunham. Portland, Ore. Greenway Apts. 

M. D., University of Oregon, 1914 ; Major, Medical Corps, U. S. A. 

Valcoulon LeMoyne Ellicott. Baltimore, Md. Melvale. 

S. B., Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 1916 ; M. D., Johns Hopkins 
University, 1920. 

John Black Grant. New York City. 3040 St. Paul St. 

A. B., Acadia College, 1912 ; M. D., University of Michigan, 1917. 

Morrill Leonard Ilsley. Washington, D. C. 1431 Park Av. 

A. B., Colby College, 1917 ; Fourth Year Medical Student, Johns Hopkins 
University. 

*Chong Eang Lim. Fukien, China. 1008 Madison Av. 

M. B. and S. B., Hong Kong University, 1916. 

*Kenneth Fuller Maxcy. Baltimore, Md. 905 Cathedral St. 

A. B., George Washington University, 1911 ; M. D., Johns Hopkins Univer- 
sity, 1915. Rockefeller Foundation Scholar. 

John William Meehan. York, Neb. 36 W. 25th St. 

A. B. and A. M., St. Mary's College. 1904 and 1906 ; M. D., Creighton Uni- 
versity, 1908 ; Major, Medical Corps, U. S. A. 



Absent on leave during first trimester. 

391 15 



10 School of Hygiene and Public Health [40 

"Ralph Welty Nauss. Greenville, 0. 

S. B., Ohio State University, 1901; M. D., Northwestern University, 1905; 
D. P. H., University of Pennsylvania, 1916. 

* Frank Oldt. Dayton, O. 20 E. \lt. Vernon PI. 

A. B., Otterbein College, 1901 ; M. D., Ohio Medical University, 1905. 
Regino Padua y Gaerlan. S. Juan, Union, J'. I. 12 03 Madison Av. 

M. I), and Dr. T. M., University of the Philippines, 1915 and 1918. 

Frank Gordon Pedley. Montreal, Canada. 1!»14 Lutaw PI. 

A. B. and fcf.D.C.lM., McGill University, 1913 and 1916. 

John Joseph Szymanski. Passaic, X. J. 715 St. Paul St. 

A. B., St. John's College (Brooklyn), 1910; M. D., Johns Hopkins Univer- 

sity, 1914. Rockefeller Foundation Scholar. 

Luis Felipe Turriago. Bogota, Colombia. 

B. Ph. e Lett., Collegium Mayor de Nuestra Senora del Kosario, 1909 ; If. D.. 

University of Bogota, 1917. 

Charlotte Condict Van Winkle. Rutherford, NT. J. 

A. B., Smith College, 1914; Fourth- Year Medical Student, Johns Hopkins 
University. 

733 A". Broadway. 

Eugene Rudolph Whitmore. Washington, D. C. 1335 77 St., N. W. 

S. B., University of Wisconsin, 1896: M. D.. University of UTnois. 1809: 
Professor of Bacteriology, George Washington University ; Lieut-Col., 
U. S. A., Retired. 

George Huntington Williams. Baltimore, Md. 803 Cathedral St. 

A. B., Harvard University, 1915 ; M. D., Johns Hopkins University, 1919. 

(22) 



candidates for the degree of doctor of science in hygiene 
Donald Leslie Augustine. Kasson, Minn. 1720 Linden Av. 

S. B., Macalester College, 1918. Helminthology. 

Clennie Elsie Bailey. Terre Haute, Ind. 2916 Allendale Rd. 

A. B., Indiana State Normal School, 1918. Immunology. 

Elery Ronald Becker. Rocky Ford, Colo. 1720 Linden Av. 

A. B., University of Colorado, 1921. Protozoology. 

Katherine Ellen Connelly. Terre Haute. Ind. 13 E. Read St. 

A. B., Indiana State Normal School, 1918. Physiology. 

Hobart William Cromwell. Center Point, Ind. 4101 Penliurst Av. 

A. B., Indiana State Normal School, 1917. Immunology. 
Juanita Elizabeth Darrah. Ivesdale, 111. 2635 N. Calvert St. 

A. B. and S. M., University of Illinois. 1913 and 1915: A.M.. Columbia 
University, 1917. Bio-Chemistry. Fellow, 1920-1921. 



Absent on leave during first trimester. 



411 Students, 1920-1921 17 

Florence Worden Dixon. Missoula, Mont. 13 E. Read St. 

A. B., University of Montana, 1920. Bacteriology. 

William Thurber Fales. Maiden, Mass. 2936 Clifton Av. 

S. B., Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 1917 ; C. P. H., Harvard Uni- 
versity and Massachusetts Institute of Technology School of Public 
Health, 1920. Epidemiology. 

Mary Gover. Baltimore, Md. 307 E. 30th St. 

A. B., Goucher College, 1913; A.M., Johns Hopkins University, 1917. 
Statistics. 

Victor Emanuel Levine. Omaha, Neb. 

A. B., College of the City of New York, 1909 ; A. M. and Ph. D., Columbia 
University, 1911 and 1914. Bio-Chemistry. 

Henrietta Lisk. Fort McCoy, Fla. 817 Park Av. 

S. B. and S. M., Florida State College, 1907 and 1909 ; A. M., Columbia 
University, 1917. Bacteriology. 

John Rice Miner. Baltimore, Md. Towson. 

A. B., University of Michigan, 1913. Statistics. 

Edith Evelyn Nicholls. Baltimore, Md. 3409 Guilford Ter. 

A. B., Smith College, 1919. Physiology. 

Ella Hutzler Oppenheimer. Baltimore, Md. 

A. B., Goucher College, 1918. Physiology. 

9 Laivina Rd., Forest Pic. 

Samuel Pitlik. Worcester, Mass. 14 N. Chester St. 

A. B., Clark College, 1917 ; A. M., University of Chicago, 1918. Statistics. 

Horace Mann Powell. Terre Haute, Ind. 4002 Ridgewood Av. 

A. B., Indiana State Normal School, 1914. Immunology. 

Ida Williams Pritchett. Baltimore, Md. Eomewood Apts. 

A. B., Bryn Mawr College, 1914. Immunology. Fellow, 1920-1921. 

Alice Raymond. Leominster, Mass. 

A. B., Middlebury College, 1910. Statistics. Fellow, 1920-1921. 

Homer William Smith. Denver, Colo. 35 E. 25th St. 

A. B., University of Denver, 1917. Physiology. Fellow, 1920-1921. 

Norman Rudolph Stoll. Detroit, Mich. 27 E. Mt. Vernon PL 

S. B., Mount Union College, 1915 ; S. M., University of Michigan, 1918. 
Helminthology. Rockefeller Foundation Scholar. 

Joseph Charles Swenarton. Washington, D. C. 829 Whittier PL 

S. B., Pennsylvania State College, 1918. Bacteriology. 

(21) 



18 School of Hygiene and Public Health [4: 



CANDIDATES FOR THE DEGREE OF BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IH BTGIENE 

Charles Katmond Cox. Baltimore, Md. LutherviUe. 

Student in Johns Hopkins University, 1918-1919. 

Margaret von Torney France. Baltimore, Md. 219 W. Lanvale Ft. 

A. B., Bryn Mawr College, 1919. 

Martin Frobisher, Jr. Englewood, X. J. 2306 Harlem Av. 

Student in Cornell University, 191C-1917 and 1919-1920. 

Winifred Anderson Goodwin. Grosse lie, Mich. Cecil Apts. 

A. B., University of Michigan, 1914. 

Marie Louise Koch. Baltimore, Md. 2524 Maryland Av. 

Student, Johns Hopkins University, 1918-1919. 

Gladys Newman. Buffalo, N. Y. 4025 Belle Av. 

A. B., Oberlin College, 1917. 

Anne Christine Shamburger. Star, N. C. Y. W. C. A. 

Student, Guilford College, 1918-1920. 

David Henry Shelling. Hartford, Conn. 404 N. Broadway. 

Student, Loyola University, 1917-1918, and Trinity College (Conn.), 1918- 
1919. 

Olive Cushing Smith. Baltimore, Md. 4 E. Biddle St. 

Student in Goucher College, 1914-1916 and Johns Hopkins Universitv, 1919- 
1920. 

(9) 



candidates for the certificate in public health 
Charles Nelson Leach. New York City. 1109 St. Paul St. 

A. B. and M. D., Leland Stanford University, 1909 and 1913. Rockefeller 
Foundation Scholar. 

John Arthur Franklin Pfeiffer. Baltimore, Md. 

iM. D., Baltimore Medical College, 1908 ; A. M. and Ph. D., George Wash- 
ington University, 1916 and 1918. 

1112 TV. Strieker St. 
Ferdinand Oscar Reinhard. Baltimore, Md. 1509 Bolton St. 

A. B. and M. D., Johns Hopkins University, 1908 and 1914. 

Ricardo Rivas Vides. San Salvador, C. A. 1112 Whitelock St. 

S. B., El Salvador Institute, 1906; M. D., El Salvador University, 1916. 

(4) 



43] Students, 1920-1921 19 



SPECIAL STUDENTS 

German Abadia. Bogota, Colombia. 

B. Ph. e Lett. Colegio Nacional de S. Bartolome, 1910 ; M. D., Universidau 
National de Columbia, Bogota, 1918. Entomology, Parasitology. 

Anna Medora Baetjer. Baltimore, Md. 500 Roland Av. 

A. B., Wellesley College, 1920. Anatomy; Histology; Physiological Hygiene. 

Claude Heman Barlow. Shaohsing, China. 27 E. Mt. Vernon PI. 

M. D.. Northwestern University, 1906. Diploma, London School of Tropical 
Medicine, 1914. Helminthology, 

Ralph Edward Barnes. Lawrence, Kans. 1102 N. Charles St. 

M. D., Keokuk Medical College (Iowa State Univ.), 1908. Bacteriology; 
Public Health Administration. 

Rollo Herbert Britten. Riverdale, Md. 

A. B., Harvard University, 1912. Statistics. 

Frederick Harrison Busby. San Francisco, Cal. 

A. B. and M. D., University of Michigan, 1909 and 1920. Parasitology. 

Charles Franklin Elvers. Baltimore, Md. Arlington. 

Student, Maryland State College, 1915-1916. Bacteriology ; Parasitology. 

Enrique Encisco Ruiz. Bogota, Colombia. 216 <W- Madison St. 

M. D., Faculdade de Medicina, Bogota, 1918. Bacteriology; Medical Zoology. 

Olympio Oliveiro Ribeiro da Fonseca. Rio Janeiro, Brazil. 
M. D., Faculdade de Medicina, Rio Janeiro, 1915. Mycology. 

Ruth Foster. Boston, Mass. 1228 Madison A v. 

Anatomy; Bacteriology ; Histology ; Pathology. 

Gabriel Garzon Cossa. Vera Cruz, Mexico. 1318 McCulloh St. 

if. D., National University of Mexico, 1913. Entomology; Parasitology. 

George Gardner Hampton. Tupelo, Miss. 

M. D., Tulane University, 1918. Parasitology. 

VAclav Hec. Plzen, Czechoslovakia. 943 Madison Av. 

M. D., University of Prague, 1920. Epidemiology ; Immunology ; Statistics. 

Mary Cushing Howard. Baltimore, Md. 835 University Parkway. 
Student in Bryn Mawr College, 1917-1918 and Johns Hopkins University. 
1918-1920. Statistics. 

Laura Belle Keisker. Louisville, Ky. 2916 Allendale Rd. 

M. D., University of Louisville, 1902. Bacteriology ; Helminthology; En- 
tomology. 

Zdenek Frank Klan. Prague, Czechoslovakia. 

Ph. D.. University of Prague, 1920. Bacteriology; Chemical Hygiene. 

Walter Emery Libby. Wuhu, Anwhei, China. 2041 Harlem Av. 
A. B., Bates College, 1908 ; M. D., University of California, 1912. Parasi- 
tology. 



20 School of Hygiene and Public Health [44 

Alexander Lynn McKay. Toronto, Canada. 

A. B. and M. B., University of Toronto, 1916 and 1920. Parasitology. 

Mary Arian Marcus. Baltimore, Md. 

Student, Tufts College Medical School, 1914-1916; Adelphi College, 1919- 
1920. Chemical Hygiene; Physiological Hygiene. 

Hugo Muench, Jr. St. Louis, Mo. 

A. B., Cornell University, 1915 ; M. D., Washington University, St. Louis. 
1918. Parasitology. 

Henry Edward Niles. Baltimore, Md. 2010 Edgrvoood St. 

A. B., Johns Hopkins University, 1920. Statistics. 

Hynek Jan Pelc. Prague, Czechoslovakia. 

M. D., University of Prague, 1919. Statistics. 

Bohuslav Pour. Prague, Czechoslovakia. 813 N. Howard St. 

IM. D., University of Prague, 1913. Bacteriology ; Epidemiology ; Immu- 
nology; Physiological Hygiene; Statistics. 

Beryl Lillian Reed. Baltimore, Md. 3409 Duval Av. 

Statistics. 

Robert Hickman Riley. Catonsville, Md. 16 W. Saratoga St. 

S. B. and M. D., University of Oklahoma, 1909 and 1913. Statistics, Epi- 
demiology. 

Juan Segovia. San Salvador, C. A. 1026 A 7 . Eutaw St. 

M. D., San Salvador University, 1912. Immunology ; Entomology; Proto- 
zoology. 

James MoCann Stoddard. Baltimore, Md. 1732 Poplar Grove St. 

S. B., Wabash College, 1898 ; M. D., Medical College of Indiana, 1902. 
Bacterology ; Public Health Administration. 

Alan Callender Sutton. Baltimore, Md. 3212 Abell Av. 

A. B. and M. D., Johns Hopkins University, 1912 and 1916. Statistics. 

Nelson John Thomas. Wheeling, W. Va. 1803 N. Broadicay. 

Student, Bethany College, 1918-1919. Bacteriology. 

Andrew Jackson Warren. Hillsboro, N". C. 

A. B. and M-. D., University of Michigan, 1909 and 1920. Parasitology. 

William Aloysius Whittle. Baltimore, Md. 4634 York Rd. 

Bacteriology. 

David Bruce Wilson. Toronto, Canada. 

A. B. and M.D, University of Toronto, 1916 and 1920. Parasitology. 

Hsiang-Fong Wu. Ka-Shing, China. 

M. D., The Special Medical School of Chiba, Japan, 1915. Immunology ; 
Protozoology. 

(33) 



45] Students, 1920-11)21 21 



SPECIAL STUDENTS KEGISTERED FOR THE INTENSIVE COURSE 

George Douglas Andrews. llarrisburg, Pa. 

District Engineer, State Department of Health, Pennsylvania. 

Elbert Martin Bond. Central Aguirre, P. Pt. 

M. D., Hahnemann Medical College, 1908 ; Medical Director, Central Aguirre 
Sugar Company. 

Josiah Slicer Bo wen. Baltimore, Md. 

M. D., University of Maryland, 1903 ; Deputy State Health Officer, Fourth 
Sanitary District of Maryland. 

Alfred Daniel Brown. Birmingham, Ala. 

Chief Sanitary Officer for Jefferson County, Alabama. 

John Moore Campbell. Harrisburg, Pa. 

M. D., University of Pennsylvania, 1905 ; Chief Medical Inspector, State 
Department of Health, Pennsylvania. 

John Wesley Cox. Clarendon, Va. 

M. D., Syracuse University, 1902 ; Associate Epidemiologist, U. S. P. H. S. ; 
Field Director, Virginia State Board of Health ; County Health Officer 
for Arlington County. 

Charles Alvtn Emerson. Harrisburg, Pa. 

A. B.. Beloit College, 1903 ; S. B., Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 
1905; C. E. (Hon.), Pennsylvania College, 1916; Chief Engineer, State 
Department of Health, Pennsylvania. 

Samuel Jayne Fort. La Plata, Md. 

M. D., University of Pennsylvania, 1882 ; Deputy State Health Officer, Sixth 
Sanitary District of Maryland. 

Ivan Maxwell Glace. Harrisburg, Pa. 

District Engineer, State Department of Health, Pennsylvania. 

William Arnold Gunther. Cumberland, Md. 

Director, Cooperative Laboratory of Allegany and Garrett Counties, State 
Department of Health, Maryland. 

Edgar Clay Harper. Martinsville, Va. 

M. D., Medical College of Virginia, 1916; Field Agent, U. S. P. H. S. ; 
Director, Virginia State Board of Health ; County Health Officer for 
Henry County. 

John Lee Hydrick. Spartanburg, S. C. 

A. B., Wofford College, 1908; Oxford University, 1908-1911; M. D,. Jeffer- 
son Medical College, 1915; Foreign Service, International Health Board, 
1916-. 

William Shirey Keister. Charlottesville, Va. 

A. iB., and A. M., Roanoke College, 1907, and 1910 ; M. D„ Johns Hopkins 
University, 1914 ; Health Officer for Albemarle County, State Board of 
Health, Virginia. 

Charles Harold Kibbey. Birmingham, Ala. 

M. D., Kentucky School of Medicine, 1895; Director of Sanitation, Ten- 
nessee Coal, Iron and Railroad Company. 



22 School of Hygiene and Public Health [40 

Coleman Brown Mark. Harrisburg, Pa. 

District Engineer, State Department of Health, Pennsylvania. 

George Clark Marlette. Hayneville, Ala. 

S. B. and M. D., University of Alabama, 1008, and 1916 ; County Health 
Officer, Alabaifa State Board of Health. 

William Colvin Miller. Harrisburg, Pa. 

M. D., University of New York, 1888; Chief, Division Public Health E-lu 
cation, State Department of Health, Pennsylvania. 

Howard Eugene Moses. Harrisburg, Pa. 

A. B., Dickinson College, 1898 ; Chief, Waterworks and Sewerage Section, 
Engineering Division, State Department of Health, Pennsylvania. 

Claude Leonidas Murphree. Gadsden, Ala. 

A. B., Walnut Grove College, 1906 ; M. D., Birmingham Medical College, 
1902 ; Health Officer for Etowah County, State Department of Health, 
Alabama. 

Solon Nunez. San Jose, C. K. 

M. D., University of Geneva, 1916 ; Assistant Director, Department of 
Ancylostomiasis, Costa Rica. 

Charles Lyndon Outland. Tarboro, N. C. 

M. D., Medical College of Virginia, 1917 ; Field Agent, U. S. P. H. S. 
Health Officer, State Board of Health, North Carolina. 

Paul Godwin Parker. Jackson, N". C. 

M. D., Medical College of Virginia, 1916 ; Health Officer for Northampton 
County, State Department of Health, North Carolina. 

Thomas Jarvis Robinson. Warrenton, Va. 

Field Agent, U. S, P. H. S. ; Field Director, Virginia State Board of 
Health ; Health Officer for Fauquier County, Virginia. 

Charles Walton Sheldon. Tioga, Pa. 

M. D., Medical College of Philadelphia, 1904 ; Supervising Medical Director, 
State Department of Health, Penns3'lvania. 

Lillian Herrald South. Louisville, Ky. 

A. B., Potter College, 1896 ; M. D., Woman's Medical College, 1904 ; Di- 
rector, Bureau of Bacteriology and Epidemiology, State Board of Health, 
Kentucky ; Professor of Bacteriology, School of Public Health, Uni- 
versity of Louisville. 

William Carter Stone. Ellicott City, Md. 

M. D., Baltimore Medical College, 1903 ; Deputy State Health Officer, Third 
Sanitary District of Maryland. 

Lewis Olds Tayntor. Salisbury, Md. 

Acting Deputy State Health Officer, Tenth Sanitary District of Maryland. 

Charles Randolph Truitt. Salisbury, Md. 

M. D., University of Maryland, 1891 ; Health Officer for Wicomico County, 
Maryland. 

Lewis Klair Woodward. Westminster, Md. 

M. D., Hahnemann Medical College (Philadelphia), 1899; Executive Secre- 
tary, State Board of Health for Carroll County ; Health Officer for 
Westminster District, Maryland. 

(29) 



471 Students, 1920-1921 23 



SUMMARY 

Fellows by Courtesy 2 

Fellows 5 

Rockefeller Foundation Scholars 7 

Candidates for the degree of Dr. P. H 22 

Candidates for the degree of Sc. D. in Hygiene 21 

Candidates for the degree of S.B. in Hygiene 9 

Candidates for the Certificate in Public Health 4 

iSpecial Students, including students in the Intensive 

Course 62 

132 

Duplicates 10 

Total 122 



24 School of Hygiene and Public Health [48 



ADVISORY BOARD OF THE FACULTY 

Frank J. Goodnow, President 

Carroll G. Bull William H. Howell 

William W. Ford Assistant Director 

Wade H. Frost Elmer V. McCollum 

John H. Gregory Arthur Newsholme 

Robert W. Hegner Raymond Pearl 

William H. Welch, Director 

By resolution of the Board of Trustees this Board is " instructed 
to report to the Trustees from time to time their suggestions and to 
prepare and carry forward the proper arrangements for the instruc- 
tion and graduation of students in the School." 

EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE 

The President of tAe University 
The Director The Assistant Director 

LIBRARY COMMITTEE 

Elmer V. McCollum George H. Robinson 

Chairman Reynold A. Spaeth 

Lowell J. Reed Elisabeth S. Thies* 

The Librarian of the University, ex officio 

COMMITTEE ON APPLICATIONS 

Carroll G. Bull Robert W. Hegner 

William W. Ford William H. Howell 

Chairman 

COMMITTEE ON PUBLICATIONS 

Robert W. Hegner William H. Howell 

Chairman Raymond Pearl 

OTHER OFFICERS 

Mary Louise Durham, Secretary 1700 St. Paul St. 

Elisabeth S. Thies, Librarian 2122 Chelsea Av. 

Ethel Norris, Artist 10 W. 25th St. 



GENERAL STATEMENT AND 
REQUIREMENTS FOR ADMISSION 



SCHOOL OF HYGIENE AND PUBLIC HEALTH 



GENERAL STATEMENT 

The need of larger and better opportunities in this conn- 
try for training and investigation in the science and art of 
Hygiene and Public Health has long been recognized. With 
the rapid advance in our knowledge of the causes and mode 
of spread of infectious diseases has come a correspondingly 
increased power of prevention which has greatly stimulated 
interest in preventive medicine and has strengthened the de- 
mands for improved standards of public health organization 
and administration. Especially urgent is the need for men 
and women trained to undertake work in this field which al- 
ready offers attractive careers for those properly qualified, and 
will offer opportunities in larger measure as the necessity for 
such training is more widely appreciated. It was a source of 
great gratification to the Johns Hopkins University to be 
enabled to open in October, 1918, a School of Hygiene and 
Public Health designed to meet the need thus briefly in- 
dicated. 

In June, 1916, the Eockefeller Foundation of New York 
notified the President of the Johns Hopkins University that 
the Foundation was prepared " to co-operate with the Uni- 
versity in the establishment of a School of Hygiene and Pub- 
lic Health for the advancement of knowledge and the train- 
ing of investigators, teachers, officials and other workers in 
these fields." 

This offer was accepted by the University, and on June 
12, 1916, the President of the University made the formal 
announcement that the Board of Trustees had authorized the 
establishment of a School of Hygiene and Public Health as 
part of the University. Dr. William H. Welch was appointed 

51] 27 



28 School of Hygiene and Puhlic Health [52 

Director and Dr. William H. Howell was named to assist in 
the work of organization. 

The history of the events leading up to this action is in 
brief as follows: On October 16, 1914, the General Educa- 
tion Board called a conference of leading authorities in public 
health work to consider the general question of the training 
of qualified sanitarians and public health officials. At the 
request of this conference Dr. W. H. Welch and Mr. Wickliffe 
Rose undertook to prepare a plan for an institute of public 
health and hygiene for submission to the General Educa- 
tion Board and the members of the conference. This report 
was made to the General Education Board on May 27, 1915. 
Subsequently, on the instruction of the Board, a committee 
was appointed to determine where such an institution could 
be located most advantageously. Acting upon the informa- 
tion gathered by this committee the Rockefeller Foundation 
decided " largely by reason of the facilities, organization and 
ideals of its Medical School," to establish a School of Hygiene 
and Public Health at the Johns Hopkins University. 

The main objects of the School are to establish courses 
for the training of qualified persons for public health work, to 
promote investigative work in hygiene and preventive medi- 
cine and provide opportunities for the training of investiga- 
tors in these subjects, and to develop adequate means for the 
dissemination of sound hygienic knowledge. Special and 
mutual advantages arise from the close relationship between 
the School and the International Health Board of the 
Rockefeller Foundation, particularly in field work and in 
the opportunities for investigation and training in tropical 
medicine and the control of special diseases. As outlined at 
present the work of the School is organized under the follow- 
ing divisions: a department of bacteriology, serology and 
immunology; a department of medical zoology; a depart- 
ment of epidemiology; a department of biometry and vital 
statistics; a department of chemical hygiene; a department 
of physiological hygiene; a department of public health 



53] Courses and Degrees 29 

administration; a department of sanitary engineering. Pro- 
vision is made for practical work in connection with federal, 
state and municipal departments of health and for instruction 
in mental and social hygiene. Men and women are admitted 
on the same terms. 

A suitable lot of land has been purchased at the corner 
of Monument and Wolfe streets, immediately adjacent to 
the grounds of the Medical School and the Johns Hopkins 
Hospital. Plans have been made for the erection of build- 
ings upon this lot to contain the laboratories, library, mu- 
seum and offices of the School. Pending the erection of these 
buildings the School has been established in a large laboratory, 
310-312 West Monument street, formerly occupied by the 
physical department of the Johns Hopkins University. 
This building and some of the adjacent laboratories have been 
completely renovated and equipped for the use of the School. 
Instruction began October 1, 1918. 

COURSES AND DEGREES 

I. Course leading to the degree of Doctor of Public 
Health (Dr. P. H.) : 

The course consists of specified work throughout two 
years, together with a summer spent in field work in some 
organized public health service. The specified work com- 
prises courses in the following subjects : advanced bacteriology 
and immunology; the chemical and bacteriological analysis 
of foods, water and sewage ; statistical methods ; sanitary and 
administrative law; nutritional and environmental hygiene; 
the history of hygiene; medical zoology; epidemiology; the 
administrative control of disease ; sanitation and public health 
organization; sanitary engineering, and social and mental 
hygiene. It is understood that these requirements may be 
modified to suit the needs or aptitudes of special students. 
An essay based upon individual study of some problem or 
subject in hygiene is to be submitted before receiving the 



30 School of Hygiene and Public Health [54 

degree. The following groups of .students will be accepted as 
candidates for this degree: 

a. Graduates of approved medical schools who have had a 

liberal education as evidenced by a degree in arts or 
science, or its equivalent. These candidates will be 
required to pursue a two-years' course together with 
one summer of practical work in an organized public 
health service. 

b. Students who have completed satisfactorily three years 

of the course in an approved medical school and who 
have had a liberal education as evidenced by a degree 
in arts or science, or its equivalent, may be accepted 
as candidates for this degree while completing the 
course in medicine. Arrangements have been made 
with the Johns Hopkins Medical School whereby a 
student may receive his degree in medicine on the 
completion of four years of work, and his degree h 
public health after an additional or fifth year ol 
work in the School of Hygiene and Public Healtl 
together with a summer spent in practical field work. 
In their fourth year these students may fill all oi 
their elective hours with subjects taken from the 
curriculum of the School of Hygiene and Public 
Health. A combined course of a similar charactei 
may be obtained with other medical schools by special 
arrangement. 

II. Courses leading to the degree of Doctor of Science ii 
Hygiene : 

The underlying object in the arrangement of these courses 
is to train specialists in the various departments of publi< 
health work, and to afford an opportunity for those not gradu- 
ated in medicine to take part in such work. The candidate is 
expected to absolve certain courses of a basic character, but 
for the most part his time is devoted to advanced work in 
some one department. This work must include a specie 



55] Courses and Degrees 31 

investigation of some problem the results of which are to 
be presented in the form of a dissertation. In view of the 
special requirements and the time implied in completing 
successfully a definite research, it may be assumed that after 
obtaining the bachelor's degree at least three years of work 
will be necessary to meet all the requirements of the degree 
of Doctor of Science in Hygiene. 

To be accepted as a candidate for this degree the following 
requirements must be fulfilled. 

a. A degree in arts or science or its equivalent, as evidence 

of a liberal education. 

b. Certificates of the satisfactory completion of adequate 

courses in chemistry, physics, and biology. 

c. Certificates of the satisfactory completion of adequate 

courses in anatomy, physiology, and pathology. 

d. In exceptional cases, on the recommendation of the head 

of a department, a candidate may be accepted who 
offers in place of (c) satisfactory evidence of special 
training of an advanced character in subjects funda- 
mental to his main field of work. 

After acceptance as a candidate the student will be assigned 
for advice and guidance to the head of the department in 
which he will specialize. In order to be recommended for the 
degree the candidate must pass satisfactory written and oral 
examinations in his major subject and must present a dis- 
sertation, in prescribed form, embodying the results of an 
independent investigation. This dissertation must be pre- 
sented to the Director, who will refer it for examination to 
a special committee. If the report of the committee is favor- 
able the candidate will be asked to appear before the faculty 
for the oral examination. The dissertation must be published 
in whole or in part within a year after its acceptance by the 
faculty. 

III. Course leading to the degree of Bachelor of Science 
in Hygiene: 



32 School of Hygiene and Public Health [56 

The course requires two years of work taken partly in the 
School of Hygiene and Public Health and partly in the Medi- 
cal School. The first year's work consists of courses in physi- 
ology, bacteriology, anatomy and histology, sanitary chemistry 
and physiology as applied to hygiene. The second year's work 
consists of courses in advanced bacteriology, immunology, 
parasitology, nutritional hygiene, physiological hygiene, sani- 
tary engineering, pathology, statistics and epidemiology. The 
arrangement of these courses is such as to permit some speci- 
alization. The student may select work preparatory to a posi- 
tion in a public health laboratory or industrial or educational 
welfare work or to a position along statistical and epidemio- 
logical lines. The requirements for matriculation in these 
courses are as follows : 

a. Certificate of matriculation in an approved college and 

the completion of at least two years of college work. 

b. Certificates of adequate courses in biology, physics, and 

chemistry, including organic chemistry. 

By an adequate course is meant in physics one year of col- 
lege work covering approximately 100 hours of laboratory and 
100 hours of class work; in biology one year of college work 
covering approximately 150 hours of laboratory and 100 hours 
of class work; in chemistry one to two years of college work 
covering approximately 250 hours of laboratory and 120 hours 
of class work. 

IV. Course leading to a Certificate in Public Health: 
A certificate in public health may be awarded to qualified 
persons after one year of residence and the satisfactory com- 
pletion of lectures and laboratory courses equivalent in amount 
to the work of a full academic year. The courses followed 
must include practical work in bacteriology, sanitary engi- 
neering, statistics and epidemiology and in such other courses 
as may be approved by the faculty. 

Candidates for these certificates must be graduates in medi- 
cine of an approved medical school or graduates in arts or 



57] Courses and Degrees 33 

science who can furnish satisfactory evidence of previous 
training in the physical and medical sciences. 

A'. Intensive Course for Public Health Officers. 

This course is offered during the last six weeks of the fall 
trimester. For the session of 1921-1922 it begins November 
14th and ends December 23rd. It is intended to meet the 
needs of public health officers wishing to increase their knowl- 
edge of hygiene and public health ; and of physicians propos- 
ing to enter into public health work who find it impracticable 
to devote a year or two years to a full course of instruction. 

The course of instruction consists chiefly of conferences 
and demonstrations, supplemented by visits of inspection to 
important sanitary and industrial works, to schools, to centers 
of sanitary administration and to specialized clinics and wel- 
fare centers. 

On each week day demonstrations or practical exercises 
occupy the hours from 9 to 1. The afternoons from 2 to 5 
are given to conferences and lectures. On two evenings a 
week conferences on important phases of public health are 
held. 

The fee for the courses is $50.00, payable on registration. 



SPECIAL STUDENTS 

An opportunity to use the facilities of the School will be 
granted to the following groups of special students not regis- 
tered as candidates for a degree : 

1. Public health officers who may wish to take one or more 

lecture or laboratory courses, or engage in the study 
of some special problem. 

2. Other qualified persons who may wish to attend special 

courses or undertake research work and whose quali- 
fications receive the formal approval of the faculty 
of the School. 

2 



34 School of Hygiene and Public Health | 58 



THE DE LAMAR LECTURES IN HYGIENE 

A series of popular lectures in personal and public hygiene 
is arranged each session. The object of these lectures 
is to bring before the public the general facts and points of 
view of modern hygiene, with the hope that in this way the 
School may serve as a center for the distribution of useful 
knowledge in all matters pertaining to sanitation and pre- 
ventive medicine. These lectures are supported from the 
fund bequeathed to the Medical School by Joseph R. De 
Lamar. 

The course given during the session of 1920-1921 was as 
follows : 

Dr. Victor G. Heiser 

Director for the East of the International Health Board 

on 

The Halifax Health Program 

Monday, October 18 



Dr. Donald B. Armstrong 

Executive Officer of the Framingham Community Health and 

Tuberculosis Demonstration 

on 

The Control and Prevention of Tuberculosis 

Monday, November 8 



Dr. Charles V. Chapin 

Superintendent of Health, Providence, R. I. 

on 

The Evolution of Preventive Medicine 

Monday, November 22 



Dr. Haven Emerson 

Former Commissioner of Health of New York City 

on 

How the Diagnosis of a Community's Health is Made 

Monday, November 29 



•0] De Lamar Lectures in Hygiene 35 

Dr. Charles W. Stiles 

United States Public Health Service 

on 

Some Practical Aspects of the Subject of Soil Pollution 

Monday, December 13 



Dr. Edward C. Schneider 

Professor of Biology, Wesleyan University 

on 

The Influence of High Altitudes on Man 

Monday, December 20 



Mr. William C. Hoad 

Professor of Sanitary Engineering, University of Michigan 

on 

Some Kelations of Engineering to Public Health 

Monday, January 10 



Sir Arthur Newsholme, M. D., K. C. B. 

Resident Lecturer in Public Health Administration 

Late Principal Medical Officer of the Local Government Board 

of England 

on 

National Changes in Health and Longevity 

Monday, January 24 



Dr. Livingston Farrand 

Chairman, Central Committee, The American Red Cross 

on 

Volunteer and Unofficial Agencies in the Public Health Field 

Monday, January 31 



Dr. Richard P. Strong 

Professor of Tropical Medicine, Harvard Medical School 

on 

The Economic Loss from Disease due to the War 

Monday, February 7 



3C School of Hygiene and Public Health | 60 

Surgeon General Hugh S. Cumminq 

United States Public Health Service 

on 

The Activities and Opportunities of the Public Health Service 

Monday, February 14 

Dr. David L. Edsall 

Professor of Clinical Medicine, Harvard Medical School 

on 

The Kelation of Occupation to Health 

Monday, February 28 

Mr. Shelby M. Harrison 

Director, Department of Surveys and Exhibits, Russell Sage 

Foundation 

on 

The Methods and Results of Public Health Surveys 

Monday, March 7 

Dr. Lawrason Brown 

of Saranac Lake, New York 

on 

Certain Causative Factors in Pulmonary Tuberculosis 

Monday, March 14 

Dr. W. S. Rankin 
State Health Officer, North Carolina State Board of Health 

on 

Certain Important Principles of State Health Administration 

Monday, April 11 

Dr. William H. Davis 

Chief Statistician, Vital Statistics, Bureau of the Census 

on 

Birth Registration in the United States 

Monday, April 25 

Dr. C. C. Bass 

Professor of Experimental Medicine, Tulane University 

on 

Control of Malaria by Curing Those Who Have It 

Monday, May 9 



61] Scholarships — Fellowships 37 

Course in School Hygiene. In addition to this series of 
lectures a special course of lectures in school hygiene, dealing 
particularly with the subjects of nutrition and diet, has been 
arranged for the summer course of the Johns Hopkins Uni- 
versity, given at Homewood in July and August. This course 
is given under the direction of Professor McCollum, and is 
supported from the De Lamar Fund. 

SCHOLARSHIPS 

A certain number of scholarships carrying free tuition are 
awarded annually by the Trustees of the University upon the 
recommendation of the faculty. These scholarships are 
awarded for one year, but may be renewed for a second year. 
Applications may be made to the Director of the School. 



FELLOWSHIPS 

Six research fellowships carrying each a stipend of $1,000, 
and exemption from all charges for tuition are awarded 
annually by the Trustees of the University upon the recom- 
mendation of the faculty. The conditions upon which these 
fellowships are awarded are as follows: 

1. The applicant must have received his doctor's degree in 

medicine, science, philosophy or public health, or fur- 
nish evidence of experience and meritorious service in 
scientific work. 

2. The holder of a fellowship must give his time pri- 

marily to investigative work, approved by some mem- 
ber of the staff of the School, and must be in residence 
during the academic year, unless permission is granted 
to him by the faculty to carry on his work elsewhere. 

3. The application should be made prior to March 1st, in 

writing, addressed to the Director of the School of 
Hygiene and Public Health. 



38 School of Hygiene and Public Health | ^t 



PUBLICATIONS 

The annual catalogue and announcement is issued as the 
April number of The Johns Hopkins University Circular. 

In June the researches published during the academic year 
by members of the staff and the advanced students are bound 
and issued as a volume of Collected Papers. The first volume 
of this series appeared in June, 1920. These volumes are dis- 
tributed to public health laboratories and are on sale to indi- 
viduals at $5.00 a volume. 

The American Journal of Hygiene supported by an appro- 
priation from the De Lamar bequest to the Medical School 
is published by the Johns Hopkins Press. Dr. W. H. Welch 
is Editor and Dr. Charles E. Simon Managing Editor. The 
journal is devoted to the publication of investigations in hy- 
giene by workers in this country and abroad. The laboratory 
and field researches carried on in the School appear for the 
most part in this journal. Monographs on special subjects 
pertaining to hygiene and preventive medicine will be issued 
from time to time as supplementary numbers of this journal. 
For further information address the Managing Editor, School 
of Hygiene and Public Health, 310-312 W. Monument Street. 

REGISTRATION AND CALENDAR 

All students upon entering must report at the Director's 
office for registration and payment of fees. 

The academic year is the same as in other departments of 
the University. 

Instruction begins in the fall on the Tuesday nearest to 
the first of October. The graduating exercises are held on 
the third Tuesday of June. There are short recesses at 
Christmas and Easter. 

Since instruction is arranged on a trimestral basis, it is 
possible for candidates for the degree of Doctor of Public 
Health or Doctor of Science in Hygiene to enter the School 



63] Tuition 39 

at the beginning of any trimester, and to graduate at the end 
of any trimester. Formal bestowal of degrees takes place at 
the University Commencement in June and on Commemora- 
tion Day, February 22nd. 

TUITION 

The charge for tuition in the courses leading to a degree 
or a certificate is $250 per annum, payable at the office of the 
Director, in three instalments, one at the beginning of each 
trimester. For students taking special courses the charge 
for one trimestral course, including laboratory work, is $50.00. 
The charge for shorter courses will be arranged on application. 



For further information address the Director of the School 
of Hygiene and Public Health, Johns Hopkins University, 
310-312 W. Monument Street, Baltimore, Md. 



DEPARTMENTS OF INSTRUCTION AND 
ANNOUNCEMENT OF COURSES 



DEPARTMENTS OF INSTRUCTION 



BACTERIOLOGY 

William W. Ford, M. D., Associate Professor. 
(George H. Kobinson, Ph. D., Associate. 
Percy D. Meader, Ph. D., Instructor. 
Linda B. Lange, M. D., Instructor. 
Raymond C. Salter, Sc. D., Assistant. 
, Assistant. 

1. Sanitary Bacteriology. Dr. Meader, Dr. Lange. 
This course is designed to give students a fundamental train- 
ing in bacteriology with special reference to sanitary bacteri- 
ology. It includes the making of the ordinary culture media, 
the preparation and use of stains, the microscopic study of 
organisms, and the methods of isolating and identifying the 
more common pathogenic and non-pathogenic bacteria. The 
methods of examining water, milk, sewage, and foods are 
considered in detail. 

Students who have received training in chemistry, physics, 
and biology, are admitted to this course, and its completion 
qualifies students for the course in public health bacteriology. 

2. Public Health Bacteriology. Dr. Ford, Dr. Bob- 

inson, Dr. . This course is designed especially for the 

training of students in the modern bacteriological methods 
employed in the diagnosis of the acute respiratory diseases, 
in the study of the infections of the intestinal tract, in genito- 
urinary infections and in the examination of water, milk, and 
foods for their sanitary quality. It includes the study of the 
pneumococcus, the influenza bacillus and the hemolytic strep- 
tococcus from sputum, the diphtheria bacillus from the secre- 
tions of the nose and throat, the meningococcus from the 
spinal fluid, and the etiological agents in gonorrhoea and 
syphilis. The newer methods for the cultivation of the tu- 

67] 43 



44 School of Hygiene and Public Health [68 

bercle bacillus from sputum are demonstrated, and the isola- 
tion of the typhoid, paratyphoid, and dysentery bacilli is prac- 
ticed as far as possible upon actual cases of disease. The 
standard methods employed in the examination of water, 
milk, and food are also included. Only those students will be 
admitted to this course who can present satisfactory evidence 
of proper training in elementary bacteriology. 

3. Public Health Laboratory Practice. Dr. Salter. 
(Limited to six students — Prerequisite Bacteriology II). 
This course is designed to give students an opportunity to do 
the routine work of a public health bacteriological laboratory. 
Practice is offered in the bacteriological diagnosis of diph- 
theria, tuberculosis, typhoid fever, gonorrhoea, syphilis, pneu- 
monia and rabies. The bacteriological examination of water, 
milk, canned goods, and feces, urine and blood is also carried 
out. The students will have opportunities to make reports, 
file records and become familiar with the problem of labora- 
tory management. 

4. Research in Bacteriology. Dr. Ford. Opportunity 
will be provided for advanced work and research in bacter- 
iology in a variety of fields. Qualified students will be given 
problems to work out under the immediate supervision of the 
Associate Professor of Bacteriology, and opportunities will 
be offered to candidates for advanced degrees to prepare these* 
on special topics. 

IMMUNOLOGY 

Carroll G. Bull, M. D., Associate Professor. 
Roscoe R. Hyde', Ph. D., Associate. 
Leon C. Havens, M. D., Associate. 
Ida W. Pritchett, A. B., Fellow. 

1. Immunology I. Dr. Hyde. This course is designed 
for those who have not had previous training in serological 
reactions. Fifteen hours a week are devoted to laboratory 
work and three hours to lectures and conferences during one 
trimester. The laboratory work gives practical training in 



69] Departments of Instruction 45 

(1) the various serological reactions, viz.: agglutination 
reactions, with bacteria and animal cells ; precipitin reactions, 
particularly for identification of unknown bloods; comple- 
ment fixation reactions, the Wassermann reaction and the fix- 
ation of complement with bacterial antigens; opsonic titra- 
tions, etc., (2) the preparation of the materials used in sero- 
logical reactions, (3) the preparation of bacterial, antirabio 
and cow-pox vaccines, and (4) the production and standard- 
ization of immune sera, antimicrobic and antitoxic. Special 
attention is given to practical diagnostic methods. 

2. Immunology II. Dr. Havens. This course is open 
to medical graduates and others who have had training in 
serological methods and the principles of immunity. Fifteen 
hours a week are devoted to laboratory work and three hours 
to lectures and conferences. The work is divided into three 
parts; (1) Serological reactions (see Immunology I), (2) 
A study of the manner in which disease-producing organisms 
produce their pathological effects and how the host defends it- 
self against the invading organisms, certain bacteria being 
chosen to illustrate the various factors concerned in infec- 
tions by different classes of organisms, e. g., the pneumococ- 
cus, typhoid and dysentery bacilli and the diphtheria bacillus, 
and (3) the preparation of a written review of the literature 
on some subject germane to the course and of current interest. 

3. Immunology III. Dr. Bull and Miss Pritchett. Pre- 
requisite, Immunology I or II or equivalent training. This 
course occupies one trimester eighteen hours a week. The 
work consists of doing a number of problems in the labora- 
tory. The problems are arranged in groups, according to 
subject, from which the student selects a minimal number, 
certain problems being required. The group on diphtheria 
will serve as an illustration. Problem (1) Prepare diphtheria 
toxin for the Schick test, (2) Prepare a toxin-antitoxin mix- 
ture for the active immunization of man against diphtheria, 

(3) Do diphtheria virulence tests on six unknown cultures, 

(4) Determine the number of units per c. c. in a furnished 
specimen of diphtheria antitoxin. The student is required to 



46 School of Hygiene cmd Public Health [70 

submit a written statement on each problem, giving a review 
of the literature on the subject, a detailed account of his own 
work and, in certain instances, samples of his preparation-. 

4. Opportunities are offered to candidates for advanced 
degrees to do thesis work under the direction of different 
members of the staff. 

SANITARY ENGINEERING 

John H. Gregory, S. B., Professor of Civil and Sanitary En- 
gineering. 

The course in sanitary engineering is given at Home- 
wood in the Department of Civil Engineering, and will con- 
sist of nine hours a week, during one trimester, divided into 
lectures, conferences, laboratory and field work, and supple- 
mented by reading. The course is designed to give the stu- 
dent a comprehensive general view of modern sanitary en- 
gineering practice. The time will be devoted largely to the 
main topics of water supply, water purification, sewerage and 
sewage disposal, with a discussion of modern methods for the 
collection and disposal of garbage and other municipal waste.-. 
The laboratory exercises will include the study and discus- 
sion of existing sanitary works from photographs, lantern 
slides and working drawings, together with inspection trips 
in the field to typical water purification and sewage disposal 
works. 

CHEMICAL HYGIENE 

Elmer V. MoCollum, Ph. D., Sc. D., Professor. 
Alfred T. Shohl, M. D., Associate. 
Mathilde Koch, S. M., Associate. 
Nina Simmonds, S. B., Associate. 
Ethel May Kinney, A. M., Assistant. 
Madeline Spencer King, A. B., Assistant. 
Juanita E. Darrah, S. M., Fellow. 

Chemical Methods as Applied to Hygiene. Three 
courses are offered involving laboratory work. These are 
offered in different trimesters. 



71] Departments of Instruction 47 

Chemical Hygiene I. Dr. A. T. Shohl. The course 
consists of laboratory work 15 hours per week, lectures and 
conferences during one trimester. The laboratory work in- 
cludes the technic of biological chemistry as applied to the 
analysis of foods, water, and drugs, and the detection of 
adulterants. The lectures parallel the work of the laboratory, 
and deal with the problems of food chemistry and with the 
economic and hygienic aspects of foods. The conferences are 
planned to familiarize the student with the use of scientific 
journals. 

Students must have had courses in qualitative, quantitative, 
and organic chemistry before being eligible to the course. 

Chemical Hygiene II. Dr. A. T. Shohl. This course 
consists of 15 hours laboratory work and three conferences per 
week during one trimester. It deals with methods used for 
the study of metabolism. The student is given practice in 
methods for the analysis of blood, urine, and feces. Special 
attention is given to the interpretation of analytical data. 
The conferences will consist of reports on selected topics in 
metabolism. Students who have satisfactorily completed 
Chemical Hygiene I are eligible to this course. 

Nutrition. Dr. E. V. McCollum. Three lectures or con- 
ferences weekly during one trimester. In this course will be 
given assigned readings. The more important researches 
which have contributed to present-day knowledge in this field 
are presented. The results of animal experimentation are 
correlated with human experience as far as possible. The 
special dietary properties of our natural food products are 
discussed and the evidence of the relation between the diet 
and health of certain large groups of people is presented. 

Chemical Hygiene III. Dr. E. V. McCollum and Dr. 
A. T. Shohl. Those who have the necessary preliminary 
training and who desire to do work of special nature will be 
received at any time during the academic year. 



IS School of Hygiene and Public Health [72 



MEDICAL ZOOLOGY 

Robert W. Hegner, Ph. D., Associate Professor of Protozoology. 
William W. Cort, Ph. D., Associate Professor of Helminthology. 
William H. Taliaferro, Ph.D., Associate in Protozoology. 
Francis M. Root, Ph. D., Associate in Medical Entomology. 
Charles E. Simon, M, D., Lecturer in Medical Zoology. 
Donald L. Augustine, B. S., Assistant in Helminthology. 
Elery R. Becker, A. B., Assistant in Protozoology and Medical 

Entomology. 
Mary J. Hogue, Ph. D., Fellow in Protozoology. 

Medical Zoology is the study of animals that cause human 
disease, are of direct injury to man, or that disseminate dis- 
ease producing organisms. It may conveniently be divided 
into three sections, Protozoology, Helminthology, and Medi- 
cal Entomology. From a public health standpoint, the most 
important species of protozoa and helminths are parasitic and 
pathogenic to man. The phenomena presented by the para- 
sitic species, however, can only be interpreted on the basis of 
a knowledge of free living species or those living in lower 
animals which are accessible for both observational and ex- 
perimental studies. Emphasis is placed on the medical 
aspects of the invasion of man by parasitic animals. The 
insects and related organisms of public health interest act 
mostly as carriers of pathogenic organisms from diseased to 
healthy animals. Related to them are animal reservoirs such 
as the rat in the case of the plague flea. The department aims 
to prepare students for public health work in medical zoology 
and to train advanced students for teaching positions and 
research work. 

1. Protozoology. Drs. Hegner, Taliaferro, and Simon. 
Three days per week during one trimester. The course con- 
sists of three lectures or conferences and fifteen hours of lab- 
oratory work per week. The aims are (1) to gain a general 
knowledge of the biology of the protozoa; (2) to become 
acquainted with pathogenic species and the diseases caused by 
them ; ( 3 ) to learn methods of preventing the spread of path- 



73] Departments of Instruction 49 

ogenic species by the control of the agents of transmission; 
(4) to acquire a knowledge of the problems presented by 
pathogenic species and the ability to solve them; thus laying 
the foundation necessary for carrying on original investiga- 
tions, and making it possible to take charge of public health 
work in protozoology in any community, and to direct cam- 
paigns in cases of epidemics. 

The lectures and conferences are devoted to the presenta- 
tion and discussion by instructors and students of informa- 
tion obtained from original observations, from current litera- 
ture, and from text and reference books. 

In the laboratory the four classes of protozoa are considered 
separately, involving the study (1) of typical free-living 
species, (2) of species parasitic in lower animals and (3) a 
more detailed examination of species parasitic in man. Meth- 
ods are given for collecting, cultivating and preparing for 
study both free-living and parasitic protozoa. 

2. Animal Parasitology. Drs. Hegner, Cort, Talia- 
ferro and Eoot. Three days per week during one trimester. 

This course is designed especially for those who wish to gain 
a knowledge of the animal parasites of man in a short time. 
The more technical phases of protozoology, helminthology and 
medical entomology are emphasized. The student is taught 
to recognize the species of parasites pathogenic to man and 
the diseases caused by them ; how to collect, prepare for study, 
examine, and cultivate the more important species; and the 
practical methods of prevention and control. 

The lectures are supplemented by the required reading of 
scientific articles in periodicals and reference books. 

The laboratory work includes the study of stages of the life 
histories of the parasites; methods of preparing material for 
study; methods of laboratory diagnosis, and the cultivation 
of parasites in lower animals and in artificial media. 

3. Helminthology. Dr. Cort, Dr. Simon and Mr. Au- 
gustine. Three days per week during one trimester. This 
course aims (1) to give a general knowledge of the biology 
of the flatworms (Platyhelminthes), round worms (Nemat- 



50 School of Hygiene and Public Health [74 

helminthes), and certain other worms; (2 ) to acquaint the 
student with pathogenic species and the diseases caused by 
them; (3) to supply practice in methods of diagnosis; (4; to 
present methods of preventing the spread of pathogenic spe- 
cies by the control of the agents of transmission; (5) to fur- 
nish a knowledge of the problems presented by pathogenic 
species that will enable the student to carry on original 
investigations or take charge of public health work in hel- 
minthology. 

Lectures are given each day which cover (1) the classifica- 
tion, structure and life history of the worms parasitic in man 
and (2) the distribution, symptomatology, pathology, diag- 
nosis and control of the diseases of man produced by para- 
sitic worms. 

The laboratory work includes a study of the general biology 
of the groups of parasitic worms which have human repre- 
sentatives and of the structure and life history of the parasitic 
worms of man and their close relatives. A careful study is 
made of the eggs of the human helminths to prepare the 
student for the diagnosis of these diseases. Whenever possible, 
living material is studied, the free stages of the worms are 
cultured and experimental life-histories are carried through. 

A conference is held each week at which reports are given 
by members of the class on some of the more strictly medical 
and public health aspects of the subject. The literature of 
human helminthology is as far as possible placed at the 
disposal of the student and emphasis is placed on the consul- 
tation of original papers rather than text books. 

4. Medical Entomology. Dr. Eoot and Mr. Becker. 
Three days per week during one trimester. This course is 
devoted chiefly to a study of the arthropods which transmit 
the bacteria, protozoa and worms that cause disease in man. 
The few arthropods which cause human disease directly are 
also considered. In this connection insect venoms are taken 
up and comparisons made with snake venoms. 

The course aims: (1) to acquaint the student with the 
fundamentals of insect structure and classification; (2) to 



75 1 Departments of Instruction 51 

enable hini to distinguish the species which carry disease from 
the harmless species; (3) to give him a working knowledge 
of the life-cycles of harmful species, actual and potential, 
especial emphasis being placed on the relation of the life-cycle 
to control measures. 

In order to include in the course all groups of insects which 
may become of sanitary importance, a few species which are 
known to carry only diseases of the lower animals are included 
in the subject-matter. In connection with the study of con- 
trol measures, the question of animal reservoirs of human 
disease is taken up, as, for instance, the relation of rats to 
bubonic plague. 

5. Investigations in Protozoology, Helminthology 
and Medical Entomology. Students who have had suffi- 
cient training may undertake original investigations in any 
of the above subjects. Small problems may be completed by 
properly qualified students in one trimester, but usually a 
year or more is required. Those who wish to elect any of 
these subjects as majors towards the degree of Doctor o_ 
Science in Hygiene or Doctor of Philosophy must plan their 
course so that a large part of their time may be devoted to 
research. 

PHYSIOLOGICAL HYGIENE 

William H. Howell, Ph. D., M. D., Professor. 
Reynold A. Spaeth, Ph. D., Associate. 
Arthur L. Meyer, M. D., Associate. 
Janet H. Clark, Ph. D., Associate. 
Ernest J. Catjlfield, M. D., Assistant. 
Homer W. Smith, A. B., Fellow. 

By physiological hygiene is understood the application of 
the facts and principles of animal physiology to problems of 
personal and public hygiene. The important subjects of diet 
and nutrition are considered in the department of chemical 
hygiene. In the department of physiological hygiene the 
subjects taken up, in addition to a general course in animal 
physiology, are personal hygiene, the physiological effects 



52 School of Hygiene and Public Health [76 

of exercise and fatigue, of variations in the composition and 
physical properties of the atmosphere, and of radiant energy 
of various kinds. The main purpose held in view is to fur- 
nish a scientific preparation for work in the fields of industrial 
and school hygiene. Course V, or an equivalent, is required 
as a preliminary to courses I, II, III and IV. 

I. The Physiology of Work and Fatigue in Industry. 
Dr. Spaeth. The lectures during the first month of this 
course are devoted to a consideration of the theoretical and 
experimental aspects of muscular and mental work and fa- 
tigue. The remainder of the course deals with practical 
problems such as the limitation of scientific management; 
the length of the industrial work day; industrial accidents 
and fatigue; the standardization of industrial working con- 
ditions; physical examination of workers, and the physical, 
physiological and psychological standardization of industrial 
workers by trades and processes. 

Approximately six weeks are taken up with laboratory 
training in physical, physiological and psychological stand- 
ardization tests for industrial workers. This work is followed 
by class visits and surveys of local industries, with reports and 
seminar discussion. Three days weekly during the first tri- 
mester, 9 a. m. to 4 p. m. 

II. The Physiological Action of Light, X-Kays, and 
other Eadiations. Dr. Clark. The lectures in this course 
deal with the effects produced in the living cell by the action 
of heat, visible and ultraviolet light, x-rays and radium. In 
connection with the pathological effects of radiant energy on 
the eye, the subject of illumination is considered, particularly 
in its relation to hygienic conditions of lighting in schools and 
factories. 

The laboratory work accompanying the lectures includes 
photometric measurements of the illumination in rooms and 
the candle power of different light sources ; visual acuity de- 
terminations under different conditions of illumination, and 
measurements of errors of vision. In addition, visits of in- 
spection are made to local schools and factories for the inv? 



77 J Departments of Instruction 53 

ligation of lighting conditions. Three days weekly, 9 a. m. 
to 4 p. m. during the first half of the third trimester. 

III. Kespiration, Ventilation and Climatology. Dr. 
Meyer. The lectures consider the following topics: the 
composition of the atmosphere and the effect upon the body 
of the gases found in the atmosphere when present in abnor- 
mal concentrations, together with the effects of the various 
meteorologic elements, such as temperature, pressure and hu- 
midity; heat regulation and heat production in the body and 
the effects of high temperatures and humidity upon the body 
under artificial and natural (tropical) conditions; ventila- 
tion in its physiological relations, including a study of the 
effects of bad air, the laws of air currents, and the various 
types of ventilation employed in schools, factories, street cars, 
subways, etc. 

The laboratory course is intended to familiarize the stu- 
dent with the methods of air analysis, including the quantita- 
tive determination of the presence of impurities, such as car- 
bon monoxid, sulphur dioxid, and dust. Exercises are given 
also in the use of various instruments applicable to the study 
of air conditions, such as the hygrometer, the kata-ther- 
mometer, the anemometer, etc. Three days weekly, 9 a. m. 
to 4 p. m., during the second half of the third trimester. 

IV. Personal Hygiene. Dr. Howell. Lectures upon the 
hygiene of the individual. The different organs of the body 
are considered with reference to the conditons that influence 
their functional activity favorably or unfavorably. Once 
weekly during the third trimester. 

V. Animal Physiology. Dr. Caulfield. This course is 
intended primarily for candidates for the degree of Bachelor 
of Science in Hygiene. It comprises conferences and recita- 
tions covering the subject of animal or human physiology as 
usually given to medical students, and laboratory exercises. 
Three days weekly during the second trimester, 9 a. m. 
to 4 p. m. 

VI. Journal Club. Dr. Howell. A journal club con- 
sisting of the instructors and advanced students in the de- 



54 School of Hygiene and Public Health [78 

partments of physiological hygiene and in the department 
of physiology in the Medical School, meets once weekly 
throughout the year. The object of these meetings is to 
present and discuss recent experimental work in physiology. 
VII. Research. Special or advanced students will be 
assigned problems for investigation under the supervision of 
members of the staff. 



BIOMETRY AND VITAL STATISTICS 

Raymond Pearl, Ph. D., Professor. 
Lowell J. Reed, Ph. D., Associate Professor. 
William T. Howard, M. D., Lecturer. 
John R. Miner, A. B., Associate. 
Sylvia M. Parker, A. B., Instructor, i 
Chester E. Rutherford, Assistant. 
Amy G. Phillips, Assistant. 
Charmian Howell, S. B., Assistant. 
Agnes L. Bacon, A. B., Volunteer Assistant. 
Alice Raymond, S. B., Fellow.* 

The work of this department is intended to meet the needs' 
of two classes of students: (a) Those training for work in 
public health; (b) those intending to specialize in statistical 
work either as teachers, investigators, or administrators. 

I. Introduction to Vital Statistics. Dr. Pearl, Dr. 
Reed, Mr. Miner, Miss Parker, and Mrs. Howell. Three days 
per week during the first trimester. The course is designed to 
acquaint the student, on the one hand, with modern methods 
of collecting, tabulating, adjusting, and drawing sound con- 
clusions from statistical data regarding human life, and. on 
the other hand, with the chief results which have accrued 
from the study of vital statistics in the past. The course 
involves a considerable amount of laboratory work, in which 
the student will gain first-hand familiarity with statistical 
data and methods in the fields of hygiene and public health. 
Special emphasis is placed upon modern biometric and graphic 
methods. 



Resigned, March 1, 1921. 



7!) I Departments of Instruction 55 

II. Advanced Statistical Theory. Dr. Keed and Mr. 
Miner. Given in second trimester. This course is intended 
to meet the needs of those students who desire to continue the 
study of statistical theory. In the first part of the course, the 
various methods of graduating statistical data will be devel- 
oped, special emphasis being placed on the methods of curve 
fitting. The second part of the course will be devoted to a 
consideration of the subject of correlation. The laboratory 
work of the course will include problems in life table con- 
st ruction, in the fitting of frequency curves and in simple and 
multiple correlation. The course is open only to those who 
have previously taken Course I in Statistics. 

III. The Statistical Measurement of the Effect- 
iveness of Public Health Activities. Dr. Howard. This 
course, open only to those who have had course I in vital 
statistics, aims to give, by means of lectures and conferences, 
a historical and critical examination of the actual results of 
various public health activities. The most suitable statis- 
tical methods for the critical measurement of the effective- 
ness of such activities will be developed. 

IV. Investigations in Biometry and Vital Statis- 
tics. Dr. Pearl. In the work of the department special at- 
tention will be devoted to research. Properly qualified work- 
ers, who may be either candidates for the degree of Doctor of 
Science in Hygiene or special students, may be taken into the 
laboratory and either assigned problems in connection with 
the general co-ordinated plan of investigation being pursued 
in the department, or aided and directed in the development 
of their own problems. The general lines along which 
research may profitably be undertaken in the department are : 
higher statistical theory, analytical studies on human vital 
statistics, genetic and other biological factors influencing the 
duration of life, the study by modern statistical methods of 
epidemiological problems. 

Additional Opportunities. There are certain opportu- 
nities for advanced students, resulting from outside connec- 



56 School of Hygiene and Public Health [80 

tions of the department, apart from the courses offered which 
require special mention. 

I. Investigations on Tuberculosis. By means of 
funds furnished from several external sources there is in 
progress in the department an intensive investigation of the 
genetic and environmental factors concerned in the etiology 
and epidemiology of tuberculosis. The investigation is being 
prosecuted by the method of intensive field study and pedigree 
analysis, along the lines which have been so fruitful in the 
general field of eugenics. 

This investigation affords to properly qualified students 
an opportunity for practical experience and training in eu- 
genic field work, and the analysis of the data from such work. 

II. Central Statistical Bureau of the Baltimore 
Alliance. In January 1920 the Baltimore Alliance, a feder- 
ation of fourteen social or charitable agencies in the City of 
Baltimore, organized a new department of potentially far- 
reaching importance. It is known as the Central Statistical 
Bureau, and forms an integral part of the Alliance. The 
functions of this Bureau are (1) to supervise, standardize, 
and control the permanent statistical records collected by each 
of the allied agencies; (2) to serve as the final repository of 
all case and statistical records; (3) on the basis of the cri- 
tically controlled basic statistical records to carry on scientific 
investigations of those broad social problems toward the ulti- 
mate permanent solution of which the activities of the Alli- 
ance are directed. 

Dr. Pearl has been appointed Director of the Central Sta- 
tistical Bureau, and Miss Magdalen H. Burger, Chief Statis- 
tician. The Bureau is housed with the department of bio- 
metry and vital statistics of the School of Hygiene and Public 
Health at 625 St. Paul Street, Baltimore. 

It is to be expected that with the passage of time there will 
accumulate in this Bureau a set of records which will offer 
unique opportunities to graduate students and others wishing 
to undertake fundamental investigations into the causes of 
poverty, disease, and other social problems. 



81] Departments of Instruction 57 

III. Hospital Statistics. Students interested in the 
statistical aspects of the problems of clinical medicine, sur- 
gery, and pathology will be afforded an opportunity of under- 
taking research upon these problems under the direction of 
Dr. Pearl. All of the extensive collection of case histories in 
the archives of the Hospital is available for such investiga- 
tions. 

PUBLIC HEALTH ADMINISTRATION 

Sir Arthur Newsholme, M. D., Resident Lecturer.* 

The work of the department comprises : 1. Lectures. 2. 
Conferences. 3. Demonstrations. 
In the lectures are included : 

A sketch of the history of public health administration and 
)f its inter-relation with other branches of administration, 
md with the medical and nursing professions. 

Method of registration of births, sickness and death. 

Methods of procedure in remedying sanitary or housing 
lefects. 

Administrative aspect of public health laboratory work. 

The prevention of the chief epidemic diseases. 

Hospital administration. 

The prevention and control of tuberculosis and of venereal 
liseases. 

Food sanitation. 

Maternity and child welfare work. 

School hygiene. 

Industrial hygiene. 

Public health nursing. 

Methods of preparing budgets. 

Conferences are held twice weekly, at which the subjects 
included in the lecture course are discussed and illustrated by 
diagrams, models, etc. 

* During the sessions of 1920-1921. 



58 School of Hygiene and Public Health [82 

Demonstrations are given of practical work in general 
public health office administration and in methods of official 
action in regard to the control of infectious diseases, to food 
and milk, housing, nuisances, slaughter-houses, etc.; in the 
collection and use of vital statistics and use of the Interna- 
tional Classification of causes of death. 

Visits are made to public health laboratories, to infectious 
diseases hospitals, to tuberculosis hospitals, sanatoria, and 
clinics, to venereal clinics, to schools, centres for maternity 
and child welfare work, and to places illustrating details in 
rural and urban sanitation, and in industrial hygiene. 

EPIDEMIOLOGY 

W. H. Frost, M. D., Surgeon, U. S. Public Health Service, 

Resident Lecturer. 
Milton V. Veldee, M. D., Associate. 
W. Thueber Fales, S. B., C. P. H., Instructor. 

The course is given in the second trimester, occupying 
eighteen hours a week. 

It is designed to give students a view of the importance 
and possibilities of epidemiological study in extending the 
knowledge of infectious diseases, and to afford them training 
in methods, especially as applicable to such studies as may 
ordinarily be made in connection with administrative meas- 
ures for the control of infectious diseases, utilizing the data 
ordinarily available to public health organizations. 

The minimum requirements for admission to the course 
are a knowledge of the basic facts and principles of bacteri- 
ology, equivalent at least to what is given in the course in 
elementary bacteriology, together with sufficient knowledge 
of elementary statistical method. Subject to certain excep- 
tions, students will be admitted to this course only after com- 
pleting the required courses in bactriology and vital statistics. 

The work consists of : 

1. A course of lectures presenting the principles and 
methods of epidemiological investigation and illustrating 



83J Departments of Instruction 59 

their application in special research and in such current study 
of infectious diseases as is a necessary part of the work of 
administrative health organization. 

2". A course of selected collateral reading. 

3. Class work, occupying approximately ten hours a week, 
in the analysis of crude epidemiological data, the presenta- 
tion of conclusions and the planning of investigations. 

4. Weekly conferences for the discussion of selected topics 
in connection with lectures, class work and collateral reading. 

5. Demonstrations, arranged through the courtesy of the 
Baltimore City and Maryland State Departments of Health, 
of the work done by these organizations and associated agen- 
cies in the study and control of infectious diseases. These 
demonstrations are supplemented by individual field work on 
the part of students in the collection of epidemiological data 
from original sources, taking advantage of such opportunities 
for field work as may be presented at the time. 

6. The preparation, by each student, of a brief thesis on 
an assigned subject in epidemiology. 



SCHEDULES OF COURSES FOR THE 
SESSION OF 1921-1922 



SCHEDULES OF COURSES 



SCHEDULE FOR THE COURSE LEADING TO THE DEGREE 
OF DOCTOR OF PUBLIC HEALTH 

The schedule arranged for candidates for the degree of 
Doctor of Public Health consists of a series of trimestral 
laboratory courses together with certain general and special 
lecture courses. The laboratory courses extend in most 
cases from 9 a. m. to 4 p. m. (Saturday, 9 a. m. to 1 p. m.), 
and will include appropriate lectures or conferences. Each 
student will be expected to complete satisfactorily twelve 
trimestral laboratory courses, taking two such courses in each 
trimester, so that under ordinary conditions two years will 
be required to complete the work for the degree. It is under- 
stood that candidates for the degree may enter upon their 
work at the beginning of any trimester. In making up his 
twelve required laboratory courses each student will be given 
an opportunity to elect two or three of these courses in one 
department. The additional elected courses will be of a spe- 
cial or advanced character. In addition each student will be 
expected to attend the afternoon lectures during one year, and 
will be requested to show evidence of satisfactory field or 
laboratory w^ork during one summer in some approved public 
health service. 

Students taking the combined course in medicine and 
public health will be required to absolve nine of the trimestral 
laboratory courses. The following provisional announcement 
is made of the arrangement of courses for the session of 1921- 
1922: 



87] 63 



04 School of Hygiene arid Public Health [88 



Fibst ok Fourth Tbimesteb (Octobeb 4 to Decembeb 23 

Hours: 9 to 4; Saturdays, 9 to 1. 

Laboratory Courses 

Monday, Wednesday, Friday Tuesday, Thursday, Saturday 

Bacteriology I. Protozoology. 

*iSanitary Engineering. Statistics I. 

Physiological Hygiene I. Immunology III. 

Bacteriology III (Three days weekly). 

Afternoon Lectures 

De Lamar Lectures Monday, 5 p. m., as announced. 

Public Health Administration. . . . Tuesday, 4 p. m. 

Selected Topics in Hygiene Wednesday, 4 p. m., Dr. Welch. 

Public Health Administration. . . . Friday, 4 p. m. 
(lOonference) 

Second or Fifth Trimester (January 3 to March 18) 

Hours: 9 to 4; Saturdays, 9 to 1. 

Laboratory Courses 

Monday, Wednesday, Friday Tuesday, Thursday, Saturday 

Bacteriology II. Epidemiology. 

Helminthology. Immunology I. 

Statistics II. Chemistry II. 

Bacteriology III (Three days weekly). 

Afternoon Lectures 

De Lamar Lectures Monday, 5 p. m., as announced. 

Public Health Administration .... Tuesday, 4 p. m. 

Selected Topics in Hygiene Wednesday, 4 p. m., Dr. Welch. 

Public Health Administration .... Friday, 4 p. m. 
((Conference) 



* Sanitary Engineering— Monday, 11.30 to 4; Wednesday, 8.30 to 12.30 
Friday, 8.30 to 9.30. 



89] Schedules of Courses 65 



Third or Sixth Trimester (March 20 to June 10) 

Hours: 9 to 4; Saturdays, 9 to 1. 

Laboratory Courses 

Monday. Wednesday, Friday Tuesday, Thursday, Saturday 

Parasitology. Immunology II. 

Physiological Hygiene II. Entomology. 

Statistics III. Chemistry I. 

Bacteriology III (Three days weekly). 

Afternoon Lectures 

De Lamar Lectures Monday, 5 p. m., as announced. 

Metabolism and Diet Monday, 4 p. m., Dr. MoCollum. 

Metabolism and Diet Tuesday, 4 p. m., Dr. McCollum. 

Sanitary Law Wednesday, 4 p. m., Dr. Goodnow. 

Personal Hygiene Thursday, 4 p. m., Dr. Howell. 

Mental Hygiene (Demonstration) .Thursday, 4.30 p. m., Dr. Adolf Meyer 

Metabolism and Diet Friday, 4 p. m., Dr. MoCollum. 

Mental Hygiene (Conference) Saturday, 2.30 p. m., Dr. Richards. 



6G School of Hygiene and Public Health [90 

SCHEDULE FOR THE COURSE LEADING TO THE DEGREE 
OF BACHELOR OF SCIENCE 

First Trimester (October 4 to December 23, 1921-1922) 
Hours: 9 to 4; Saturdays, 9 to 1. 
Laboratory Courses: 

Bacteriology I Monday, Wednesday, Friday. 

Anatomy Tuesday, Thursday. 

Afternoon Lectures: 

De Lamar Lectures Monday, 5 p. m., u< announced. 

Second Trimester (January 3 to March 18, 1921-1922! 
Hours: 9 to 4 ; Saturdays, 9 to 1. 
Laboratory Courses: 

Physiology Monday, Wednesday, Friday. 

Histology Tuesday, Thursday. 

Afternoon Lectures: 

De Lamar Lectures Monday, 5 p. m., as announced. 

Third Trimester (March 20 to June 10, 1921-1922) 
Hours: 9 to 4; Saturdays, 9 to 1. 
Laboratory Courses: 

Physiological Hygiene II Monday, Wednesday, Friday. 

Chemistry Tuesday, Thursday, Saturday. 

Afternoon Lectures: 

De Lamar Lectures Monday, 5 p. m., as announced. 

Personal Hygiene Thursday, 4 p. m. Dr. Howell. 

Fourth Trimester (1922-1923) 
Hours: 9 to 4; Saturdays, 9 to 1. 
Laboratory Courses: 

Sanitary Engineering Monday, 11.30 to 4. Wednesday, 8.3( 

to 12.30. Friday, 8.30 to 9.30. 
Physiological Hygiene I 
or Statistics I Tuesday, Thursday, Saturday. 

Afternoon Lectures : 

De Lamar Lectures Monday, 5 p. m.. as announced. 

Public Health Administration Tuesday, 4 p. m. 

Selected Topics in Hygiene Wednesday, 4 p. m., Dr. Welch. 



91] Schedules of Courses 07 

Fifth Trimester (1922-1923) 
Hours: 9 to 4; Saturdays, 9 to 1. 

Laboratory Courses: 

Bacteriology II Monday, Wednesday, Friday. 

Immunology I or Epidemiology Tuesday, Thursday, Saturday. 

Afternoon Lectures: 

De Lamar Lectures Monday, 5 p. m., as announced. 

Public Health Administration Tuesday, 4 p. m. 

Selected Topics in Hygiene Wednesday, 4 p. m., Dr. Welch. 

Sixth Trimester (1922-1923) 
Hours: 9 to 4; Saturdays, 9 to 1. 

Laboratory Courses: 

Parasitology Monday, Wednesday, Friday. 

Elementary Pathology Tuesday, Thursday. 

Afternoon Lectures: 

De Lamar Lectures Monday, 5 p. m., as announced. 

Metabolism and Diet Monday, 4 p. m., Dr. McCollum. 

Metabolism and Diet Tuesday, 4 p. m., Dr. McCollum. 

Sanitary Law Wednesday, 4 p. m., Dr. Goodnow. 

Metabolism and Diet Friday, 4 p. m., Dr. McCollum. 



08 School of Hygiene and Public Health [02 



SCHEDULE FOR THE COURSE LEADING TO THE 
CERTIFICATE IN PUBLIC HEALTH 

First Trimester (October I ro Decembeb 23) 

Hours: 9 to 4; Saturdays, 9 to 1 

Laboratory Courses 

*iSanitary Engineering Monday, Wednesday, Friday. 

(Statistics I Tuesday, Thursday, Saturday. 

Afternoon Lectures 

De Lamar Lectures Monday, 5 p. m., as announced. 

Public Health Administration Tuesday, 4 p. m. 

Selected Topics in Hygiene Wednesday, 4 p. m., Dr. Welch. 

Public Health Administration Friday, 4 p. m. 

(Conference) 

Second Trimester (January 3 to March 18) 

Hours: 9 to 4; Saturdays, 9 to 1. 

Laboratory Courses 

Bacteriology II Monday, Wednesday, Friday. 

Epidemiology Tuesday, Thursday, Saturday. 

Afternoon Lectures 

De Lamar Lectures Monday, 5 p. m., as announced. 

Public Health Administration Tuesday, 4 p. m. 

Selected Topics in Hygiene Wednesday, 4 p. m., Dr. Welch. 

Public Health Administration Friday, 4 p. m. 

(Conference) 

Third Trimester (March 20 to June 10) 
Hours: 9 to 4; Saturdays, 9 to 1. 
Laboratory Courses 
Parasitology or Physiological 

Hygiene II or Statistics III Monday, Wednesday, Friday. 

Immunology II, or Entomology 
or Chemistry I Tuesday, Thursday, Saturday. 

* Sanitary Engineering — Monday, 11.30 to 4; Wednesday, 8.30 to 
12.30; Friday, 8.30 to 9.30. 



Schedules of Courses 69 

Afternoon Lectures 

De Lamar Lectures Monday, 5 p. m., as announced. 

Metabolism and Diet Monday, 4 p. m., Dr. McCollum 

Metabolism and Diet Tuesday, 4 p. m ., Dr. McCollum.' 

Sanitary Law. Wednesday, 4 p. m., Dr. Goodnow. 

Personal Hygiene Thursday, 4 p. m., Dr. Howell. 

Mental Hygiene (Demonstration) . . .Thursday, 4.30 p. m., Dr A Meyer 

Metabolism and Diet Frid ay, 4 p. m., Dr. McCollum. 

Mental Hygiene (Conference) Saturday, 2.30 p. m., Dr. Richards. 

INTENSIVE COURSE FOR PUBLIC HEALTH OFFICERS 

The daily schedule arranged for this course during the session 

1920-1921, November 8 to December 18, comprised the following 

exercises : fo 



Laboratory Dmonstrations Exercises 

9 a. m. to 1 p. m. 
Bacteriology. 9 



Medical Zoology. 

Vital Statistics. 
Physiology (Dust - Illumina- 
tion-Fatigue). 
Food and Nutrition. 
Sanitary Engineering. 
Immunology. 

Afternoon Demonstrations 
2 to 5 p. m. 

Epidemiology. 

City Administration. 

Sta^e Administration. 

Municipal Tuberculosis Work. 

City Methods of Control of In- 
fectious Diseases. 

Maternity and Pre - Natal 
Clinic. 

Venereal Diseases. 

Child Welfare Work. 

Water Plants. 

Milk Inspection. 



Drs. Ford, Robinson, Meader, 

Lange, Salter. 
Drs. Hegner, Cort, Taliaferro, 

Root, Simon. 
Drs. Pearl, Reed, Miner, Parker. 

Drs. Spaeth, Clark, Meyer. 
Drs. McCollum and Shohl. 
Professor Gregory. 
Dr. Havens. 



•5 Dr. Frost. 

1 Dr. Jones. 

1 Dr. Fulton. 

1 Dr. Jones. 

1 Dr. Jones and Dr. Hogan. 

Dr. Whitridge 'Williams. 
Dr. Rytina. 
Dr. Mary Sherwood. 
Professor Gregory. 
Dr. Shohl. 



70 School of Hygiene and Public Health [lit 

Afternoon Conferences 
2 to 4 p. m. 

Municipal, County and State Pub- 
lic Health Administration Chairman, Dr. J. S. Fulton. 

Hospital Administration Chairman. J Jr. Win ford Smith. 

Control of Tuberculosis Chairman, ,Sir Arthur Newsholme. 

(Control of Acute Infectious Dis- 
eases Chairman, Dr. W. H. Froal . 

Control of Scbool Medical Inspec- 
tion Chairman, President Goodnow. 

Control of Venereal Diseases Chairman, Dr. W. H. Howell. 

Feeble Minded Children Chairman, Dr. W. B. Cornell. 

Intestinal Diseases Chairman, Dr. L. L. Lumsden. 

Sanitary Inspection and Housing . . Chairman, Prof. J. H. Gregory. 

Maternity and Child Welfare Work. Chairman, Dr. J. H. M. Knox. 

Voluntary Public Health Agencies . Chairman, Dr Livingston Farrand. 

Publicity Work Chairman, Dr. C. Hampson Jones. 

Preparation of Budgets Chairman, Dr. A. J. McLaughlin. 

Afternoon Lectures 
4 to 5 p. m. 
Dr. Welch, Sir Arthur Newsholme, President Goodnow, Dr. Howell, Dr. 
McCollum and Dr. C. G. Bull. 



INDEX 



INDEX OF NAMES 



PAGE 

Abadia, G 19 

Abriol, R 15 

Ackert, J. E 14 

Andrews, G. D 21 

Armstrong. D. B 34 

Atwater, R. M 14, 15 

Lugustine, D. L 13, 16, 48, 49 

Bacon, A. L 13, 54 

Baetjer, A. M 19 

Bailey, C. E 16 

Bailey, G. H 14, 15 

Baker, N. D 6 

Barlow, C. H 19 

Barnes, R. E 19 

Bass. C. C 36 

Becker, E. R 13, 16, 48, 50 

Boeck, W. C 14 

Bond, E. M 21 

Bowen, J. S 21 

Boyce, W. G 6 

Britten, R. H 19 

Brown, A. D 21 

Brown, L 36 

Brown, 0. G 15 

Bull, C. G 9, 24. 44, 45. 70 

Burger, fl. H 56 

Busby, F. H 19 

Campbell, J. M 21 

Oaulfield, E. J 12, 51, 53 

Chapin, C. V 34 

Olark, J. H 11. 51, 52. 69 

Oollinson, J 15 

Connelly, K. E 16 

Cornell, W. B 70 

Cort, W. W 9, 48, 49. 69 

Cox, C. R 18 

Cox, J. W 21 

Cromwell, H 16 

Cumming, H. S 36 

Darrah, J. E 14,16. 46 

Davis, W. H 36 

DeLamar. J. R 34, 37. 38 

Dixon, F. W 17 

Doull, J. A 15 

Dunham, G. C. . . 15 

Durham. M. L 24 

Edsall, D. L 36 

97] 



PAGE 

Ellicott, V. L ' 15 

Elvers, C. F 19 

Emerson, C. A 21 

Emerson, H 34 

Enciso, E 19 

Fales, W. T 12, 17, 58 

Farrand, L 35, 70 

Fonseca, O. O. R. d 19 

Ford, W. W 8, 24. 43, 44, 69 

Fort, S. J 21 

Foster, R 19 

France, M. vT 18 

Frobisher, M., Jr 18 

Frost, W. H 8, 24, 58, 69, 70 

Fulton, J. S 9, 69, 70 

Gaerlan, R. Padua 16 

Garzon-Cossa, G 19 

Glace, I. M 21 

Glenn, J., Jr 6 

Goodnow, F. J 7, 65, 67, 69, 70 

Goodwin, W. A 18 

Cover, M 17 

Grant, J. B 15 

Gregory, J. H 8, 24, 46, 69. 70 

Griswold, B. H., Jr 6 

Gunther, W. A 21 

Hampton, G. G 19 

Harlan, H. D 6 

Harper, E. C 21 

Harrison. S. M 36 

Havens, L. 12. 44, 45. 69 

Hec, V 19 

Hegner, R. W .9, 24, 48, 49, 69 

Heiser, V. G 34 

Hoad, W. C 35 

Hogan, J. F 69 

Hogue, M. J 14. 48 

Howard, M. C 19 

Howard, W. T 9, 54, 55 

Howell, C 13. 54 

Howell, W. H.. 7, 24. 28, 51, 

53. 65. 66. 69, 70 

Hyde, R. R .11, 44 

Hydrick. J. L 21 

Ilsley, M. L 15 

Jones, C. H 10. 69. 70 

Keisker, L. B 19 

73 



School of Hygiene and Public Health [98 



PAGE 

Keister, W. S 21 

Keyser, R. B 6 

Kibbey, C. H 21 

King, M. S 13, 46 

Kinney, E. M 13. 46 

Klan, Z. F 19 

Knox, J. H. M 70 

Koch, M 11, 46 

Koch, M. L 18 

Lange, L. B 12, 43. 69 

Leach, C. N 14, 18 

Levering, E 6 

Levine, V. E 17 

Libby, W. E 19 

Lisk, H 17 

Lim, C. E 15 

Lumsden, L. L 70 

McCollum, E. V., 7, 24, 37, 46, 

47, 65, 67. 69. 70 

McKay, A. L 20 

McLaughlin, A.J 70 

Marburg-, T 6 

Marcus, M. A 20 

Mark, C. B 22 

Marlette, G. C 22 

Maxcy, K. F 14. 15 

Meader, P. D 12, 43 

Meehan, J. W 15 

Meyer, A 65 .69 

Meyer, A. L 11, 51, ."»:5. 69 

Miller, W. C 22 

Miner, J. R 10, 17, 54, 55, 69 

Meses, H. E 22 

Muench, H., Jr 20 

Murphree, C. L 22 

Nauss, R. W 16 

Newman, G 18 

Newsholme, A 8. 24, 35, 57, 70 

Nicholls, E. E 17 

Niles, H. E 20 

Norris, E 24 

Nunez, S 22 

Oldt, F 16 

Oppenheimer, E. H 17 

Outland, C. L 22 

Padua-Gaerlan, R 16 

Parker, P. G 22 

Parker; S. L 12, 54, 69 

Pearl, R 8, 24, 54, 55, 56, 57. 69 

Pedley, F 16 

Pelc, H. J 20 

Pfeiffer, J. A. F lg 



PAOI 

Phillip*, A. G 13, 54 

Pitlik, 8 17 

Pleaaanto, J. Ji 6 

Pour, B 20 

Powell. If. ft 17 

Pritchett, I. W 14. 17. 44, 45 

Randall, B 6 

Rankin, W. 8 36 

Raymond, A 14. 17, 54 

Reed, B. L 20 

Reed, L. J 9, 24. 54. 55, 09 

Ileinhard, F. 18 

Richards, E. L 65, 69 

Riley, R. H 20 

Rivas-Vides, R 18 

Robinson, G. K 10. 24. 43. 69 

Robinson, T. J 22 

Root, F. M 11, 48. 49. 50, 69 

Rose, W 28 

Rutherford, C. E 13. 54 

Rytina, A. G 69 

Salter, R. C 13. 43. 44, 69 

Schneider, E. C 35 

Segovia, J 20 

Shamburger, A. C 18 

Sheldon, C. W 22 

Shelling, D. H 18 

Sherwood, M 69 

Shohl, A. T 12, 46, 47, 69 

Simmonds, N 11. 46 

Simon, C. E 10, 38, 48. 49. 69 

Smith, H. W 14. 17, 51 

Smith, O. C 18 

Smith, W 70 

Snow, W. F 10 

South, L. H 22 

Spaeth, R. A 10, 24, 51. 52. 69 

Stiles, C. W 35 

Stoddard, J. M 20 

Stoll, N. R 14. 17 

Stone, W. C 22 

Strong, R. P 35 

Sutton, A. C 20 

Swenarton, J. C 17 

Szymanski, J. J 14. 16 

Taliaferro, W. H 11, 48, 49. 69 

Tayntor. L. O 22 

Thies, E. S 24 

Thomas, N. J 20 

Truitt, C. R 22 

Turriago. L. F 16 

Van Winkle, C. C 16 



99] 



Index of Names 



75 



PAGE 

Veldee, M. V 12, 58 

Yhles, R. Rivas 18 

Warren, A. J 20 

Welcch, W. H., 7. 24, 27, 38, 64, 

66. 67, 68, 70 

White, M., Jr 6 

Whitmore, E. R 16 

Whittle. W. A 20 



PACK 

Willard, D 6 

Williams, J. W 69 

Williams, G. H 16 

Wilson, D. P 20 

Wood, F. W 6 

Woodward, L. K 22 

Wu, H. F 20 

Yokogawa, S 14 



INDEX 



PAGE 

Admission, Requirements for 

27, 30, 31, 32, 33, 

Advisory Board of the Faculty 24 

Applications, Committee on 24 

Artist 24 

Assistant Director 7, 24, 28 

Assistants 13 

Associates 10 

Assooiate Professors 8 

Announcement of Courses, Depart- 
ments of Instruction and, 

.Bacteriology 43 

Biometry and Vital Statistics, 54 

Chemical Hygiene 46 

Epidemioolgy 58 

Immunology 44 

iMedical Zoology 48 

Physiological Hygiene 51 

Public Health Administration, 57 

Sanitary Engineering 46 

Special Students 33 

Intensive, for Health Officers, 33 
Bachelor of Science in Hygiene, 

Candidates for degree of... 18 

Course leading to degree of, 31 

iSchedule for course 66 

Bacteriology, Course in 43 

Biometry and Vital Statistics. 

Course in 54 

Board of Trustees 6 

Advisory, of the Faculty 24 

Calendar 5 

Registration and 38 

Candidates for degree of Doctor of 

Public Health 15 

Doctor of Science in Hygiene, 16 
Bachelor of Science in Hy- 
giene 18 

Certificate in Public Health 18 

Certificate in Public Health, Course 

leading to 32 

Chemical Hygiene, Course in 46 

Committee, Executive 24 

Library .». "... 24 

On Applications 24 

On Publications 24 

Contents 3 

70 



Courses 

Doctor of Public Health 29 

Doctor of Science in Bygiene, 86 
Bachelor of Science in Hy- 
giene 31 

Certificate in Public Health.. 32 

Special Students 33 

Intensive for Health Officers, 38 

Schedule sof 68, 86, 68. 69 

Degrees, Candidates for 

Doctor of Public Health IS 

Doctor of Science in Hygiene, 16 
Bachelor of Science in Hy- 
giene 18 

De Lamar Lectures in Hygiene... 34 
Departments of Instruction and 
Announcement of Cours« g, 

Bacteriology 43 

Biometry and Vital Statistics, "-4 

Chemical Hygiene 46 

Epidemiology 58 

Immunology' 44 

Medical Zoology 48 

Physiological Hygiene 51 

Pubilc Health Administration. ?>7 

Sanitary Engineering 46 

Special Students 33 

Intensive, for Health Officers. 33 

Director 7. 24. 27. 37. 39 

Assistant 7. 24. 28 

Doctor of Public Health, 

Candidates for degree of 15 

Course leading to degree of . . 29 

Schedule for course 63 

Doctor of Science in Hygiene, Can- 
didates for degree of 16 

Course leading to degree of . . 30 

Epidemiology, Course in 58 

Executive Committee 24 

Faculty 7 

Advisory Board of the 24. 

Fellows 14 

By Courtesy 14 

Fellowships 37 

General Statement 27 

Health Officers. Intensive Course for, 33 

Immunology, Course in 44 

[100 



101] 



Index 



PAGE 

Instruction and Announcement of 
Courses, Departments of, 

Bacteriology 43 

Biometry and Vital Statistics, 54 

Chemical Hygiene 46 

Epidemiology 58 

Immunology 44 

Medical Zoology 48 

Physiological Hygiene 51 

Public Health Administration, 57 

Sanitary Engineering 46 

Special Students 33 

Intensive, for Health Officers. 33 

Instructors 11 

Intensive Course for Public Health 

Officers 33 

Lecturers 9 

De Lamar 34 

Lectures, De Lamar 34 

School Hygiene 37 

Library Committee 24 

Librarian 24 

Medical Zoology, Course in 48 

Physiological Hygiene, Course in . . 51 

Officers 24 

President of the University .... 6, 7, 24 

Professors 7 

Associate 8 

Public Health, 

Course leading to Certificate in, 32 
Public Health Administration, 

Course in 57 

Public Health Officers, 

Intensive Course for 33 

Public Lectures 34 



PAGE 

Publications 38 

Committee on ,. . . 24 

Requirements for Admission 

29, 30, 81, 32 

Registration and Calendar 38 

Rockefeller Foundation Scholars.. 14 

Sanitary Engineering, Course in . . 46 
Schedules of Courses, 

Doctor of Public Health 63 

Bachelor of Science in Hy- 
giene 66 

Certificate in Public Health. 68 
Intensive Course for Health 

Officers 69 

Scholars, Rockefeller Foundation.. 14 

Scholarships 37 

School Hygiene, Course in 37 

Secretary 24 

Special Students, Courses for 33 

List of 19 

Statement, General 27 

Statistics, Course in Biometry and 

Vital 54 

Students, 1920-1921 15 

Special 19 

Intensive course 21 

Summary of Students 23 

Treasurer of the University 6 

Trustees, Board of 6 

Tuition 39 

University, President of 6 

Treasurer of 6 

Trustees of 6 

Zoology, Course in Medical 48 




Series, 1922 Whole Number 337 

No. 3 UNIVERSITY OF ILMJIOIS 

THE MAY b iy ^ 

JOHNS HOPkTn? 
UNIVERSITY CIRCULAR 



SCHOOL OF HYGIENE AND 
PUBLIC HEALTH 

CATALOGUE AND ANNOUNCEMENT 
FOR 1922-1923 



Baltimore, Maryland 
Published by the University 
Issued January, March, April, June, July, October, November 



APRIL, 1922 



Entered, October 21, 1903, at Baltimore, Md., as second-class matter, under 
Act of Congress of July 16, 1894 

Acceptance for mailing at special rate of postage provided for in Section 1103, 
Act of October 3, 1917. Authorized on July 3, 1918 



THE 

JOHNS HOPKINS UNIVERSITY 

SCHOOL OF HYGIENE AND 
PUBLIC HEALTH 

CATALOGUE AND ANNOUNCEMENT 
FOR 1922-1923 




Baltimore 

The Johns Hopkins Press 

1922 



CONTENTS 



Calendar 5 

trustees of the johns hopkins university 6 

treas'.rer of the university 6 

Faculty 7 

Fellows 14 

Rockefeller Foundation Fellows 15 

International Health Board Fellows 15 

Students 17 

Summary 25 

Advisory Board of the Faculty 26 

Executive Committee 26 

Committee on Applications 26 

Committee on Publications. 26 

Library Committee 26 

Other Officers 26 

General Statement and Requirements for Admission: 

General Statement 29 

Courses and Degrees: 

Doctor of Public Health 31 

Doctor of Science in Hygiene 32 

Certificate in Public Health 34 

Bachelor of Science in Hygiene 34 

Intensive Course for Public Health Officers 35 

Intensive Course in Medical Zoology 36 

Special Students 36 

The De Lamar Lectures in Hygiene 37 

Public Lectures 37 

Course in General Hygiene 39 

Scholarships 40 

Fellowships 40 

Publications 41 

Registration and Calendar 41 

TUITION 42 

Departments of Instruction and Announcements of Courses: 

Bacteriology , . 45 

Immunology 47 

Sanitary Engineeriny 49 

Chemical Hygiene 40 

Medical Zoology 51 

Physiological Hygiene 57 

Biometry and Vital Statistics 59 

Epidemiology 62 

Public Health Administration 64 

Schedules of Courses for the Season of 1922-1923 : 

Doctor of Public Health 69 

Certificate in Public Health 75 

Bachelor of Science in Hygiene 76 

Intensive Course for Public Health Officers 78 

Degrees Conferred, 1919-22 81 

Alphabetical Index of Names 85 

LVDEX 87 



1922 


JANUARY 


FEBRUARY 


MARCH 


APKIL 


s 


|M 


T 


W 


T 


F|» 


SIM 


T|W| 


iyi 


S 


S |M 
1 


T|W|T | 


F 


s 


s 


|M 


T 


W|T|F 


S 


i 


2 


3 


4 


5 


6 


7 




..' I 1 


2 


3 


4 


.J.. 




1 


2 


3 


4 














1 


8 


'■> 


10 


11 


12 


13 


14 


5 6 


7 


B 


9 


10 


11 


5| 6 


7 


8 


9 


10 


11 


2 


3 


4 


5 


6 


7 


8 


15 


10 


17 


18 


19 


20 


2! 


12 13 


1 1 


15 


Hi 


17 


18 


12113 


14 


15 


16 


17 


18 


9 


10 


11 


12 


13 


14 


15 


22 


23 


24 


25 


26 


27 


28 


19 20 


21 


22 


23 


2 4 


2 5 


19|20 


21 


22 


23 


u 


25 


16 


17 


18 


19 


20 


21 


22 


29 


30 


31 










26 27 


28 










26127 


28 


29 


30 


31 




2:; 

30 


24 


25 20 


■ll 


28 


29 


MAY 


JUNE 


JULY 


AUGUST 


S |M|T 


W|T| F 


s 


S |M 


i|W|T|F 


S 


s 


M 


T| 


W 


T| 


F 


S 


s 


II 


T|W|T| 


F 


S 




1 2 


8 


4 


5 


6 










1 


2 


3 














j 






1 


2 


3 


4 


6 


7 


8 


9 


10 


11 


12 


13 


4 


5 


6 


7 


8 


9 


10 


2 


3 


4 


5 


6 


7 


8 


6 


7 


8 


9 


10 


11 


12 


14 


15 


10 


17 


18 


19 


20 


11 


12 


13 


14 


15 


16 


17 


9 


10 


11 


12 


13 


14 


15 


13 


14 


15 


16 


17 


18 


19 


21 


22 


23 


24 


25 


26 


27 


18H9 


20 


21 


22 


23 


24 


16 


17 


18 


19 


20 


21 


22 


20 


21 


22 


23 


24 


25 


26 


28 


29 


30 


31 








25126 


27 


28 


29 


30 




23 
80 


24 
31 


25 


26 


27 


28 


28 


27 


28 


29 


30 


31 














SI 


M 


T 


W\T\ 


F 


S 


S 


M 


T| 


W|T | F 


S 


s 


M 


T 


W| 


T| 


F 


8 


S |M 


T 


W|T|F 


6 1 












1 


2 


1 


2 


3 


4 


5 


6 


7 








1 


2 


3 


4 










1 


2 


3 


4 


5 


6 


7 


8 


9 


8 


9 


10 


11 


12 


13 


14 


5 


6 


7 


8 


9 


10 


11 


3 4 


5 


6 


7 


8 


9 


10 


11 


12 


13 


14 


15 


16 


15 


16 


17 


18 


19 


20 


21 


12 


13 


14 


15 


16 


17 


18 


10 11 


12 


13 


14 


15 


16 


17 


18 


19 


20 


21 


22 


23 


22 


23 24 


25 26 


27 


28 


19 


20 


21 


22 


23 


24 


25 


17 18 


19 


20 


21 


22 


23 


24 


25 


26 


27 


28 


29 


30 


29 


30 31 


.... 






26 


27 


28 


29 


30 






24|25 
81|.. 


20 


27 


28 


29 


30 


1923 


JANUARY 


FEBRUARY 


MARCH 


APRIL 


S |M 


T 


W|T|F 


S 


8 


M 


T|W}T| F 


S 


s 


M 


T 


W| 


T 


F 


S 


S 


|M|T 


W|T|F 


8 




1 


2 


3 


4 


5 


fl 










1 


2 


3 










1 


2 


3 


i 


2 


3 


4 


5 


6 


7 


7 


8 


9 


10 


11 


12 


13 


4 


5 


6 


7 


8 


9 


10 


4 


5 


6 


7 


B 


9 


10 


8 


9 


10 


11 


12 


13 


14 


14 


15 


16 


17 


18 


19 20 


11 


12 


13 


14 


15 


16 


17 


11 


12 


13 


14 


15 


16 


17 


15 


16 


17 


18 


19 


20 


21 


21 


22 


23 


24 


25 


26 


27 


IS 


19 


20 


21 


2°, 


23 


24 


18 


19 


20 


21 


22 


23 


24 


22 


23 


24 


25 


26 


27 


28 1 


28 


29 


30 


31 








25 


26 


27 


2S 








25 


26 


27 


23 


29 


30 


31 


29 


!30 












MAY 


JUNE 


JULY 


AUGUST 


s 


M 


T 


W 


T 


F| S 


s 


M 


T 


W|T 


F 


S 


SIM 


T 


W| 


T 


F 


S 


S|M 


T 


W 


T 


F 


S 






1 


2 


3 


4 


5 












1 


2 


1 


2 


3 


4 


5 


6 


7 








1 


2 


3 


4 


6 


7 


8 


9 


10 


11 


12 


3 


4 


5 


6 


7 


8 


9 


8 


9 


10 


11 


12 


13 


14 


5 


6 


7 


8 


9 


10 


11 


13 


14 


15 


16 


17 


18 


19 


10 


11 


1? 


13 


14 


15 


16 


15 


16 


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CALENDAR, 1922 1923 



1922 

June 13, Tuesday — 'Conferring of degrees (4 p. m.). 

October 3, Tuesday — Instruction begins. Fifth academic year. 

November 30, Thursday — Thanksgiving Day (all classes sus- 
pended ) . 

December 23, Saturday — Christmas recess begins (no classes). 

1923 

January 2, Tuesday — Instruction resumed. 

February 22, Thursday — (Commemoration Day. Public exercises 
at 11 a. m. (All classes suspended). 

March 29, Thursday — Faster recess begins ( no classes ) . 

April 5, Thursday — Instruction resumed. 

June 12, Tuesday — Conferring of degrees (4 p. m.). 

October 2, Tuesday — Instruction begins. Sixth academic year. 



BOARD OF TRUSTEES 



R. Brent Keyser, President 
Eugene Levering 
Theodore Marburg 
Blanchard Randall 
Henry D. Harlan, Secretary 
Miles White, Jr. 



B. Howell Gbiswold, Jr. 

John Glenn, Jr. 
Frederick W. Wood 
Daniel Willard 
Newton D. Baker 
J. Hall Pleasants 



The President of the University, cx officio 



W. Graham Boyce, Treasurer 



FACULTY 



FRANK JOHNSON GOODNOW, LL. D. 

President of the University 

A. B., Amherst College, 1879, and A. M., 1887 ; LL. B., Columbia University, 1882 ; 
LL. D., Amherst College, 1897, Columbia University, 1904, Harvard University, 
1909, Brown University, 1914, Princeton University, 1917 ; Professor of Admin- 
istrative Law, Columbia University, 1887-1914. 

6 W. Madison St. 

WILLIAM HENRY WELCH, M. D., LL. D. 

Director and Head of the Department of Bacteriology and 

Immunology 

A. B., Yale University, 1870 ; M. D., Columbia University (College of Physicians 
and Surgeons, N. Y.), 1875; M. D. (Hon.), University of Pennsylvania, 1894; 
LL. D., Western Reserve University, 1894, Yale University, 1896, Harvard 
University, 1900, University of Toronto, 1903, Columbia University, 1904, Jeffer- 
son Medical College, 1907, Princeton University, 1910, Washington University, 
1915, and University of Chicago, 1916 ; Professor of Pathological Anatomy and 
General Pathology in the Bellevue Hospital Medical College, N. Y., 1879-1884 ; 
Pathologist to the Johns Hopkins Hospital and Baxley Professor of Pathology, 
1884-1917 ; Dean of the Medical Faculty, 1889-1898 ; President of the National 
Academy of Sciences, 1913-1917 ; President of the Board of Directors of the 
Rockefeller Institute for Medical Research ; President of the American Association 
for the Advancement of Science, 1906 ; President of the American Medical Asso- 
ciation, 1910-1911; Member of the American Philosophical Society; Honorary 
Fellow, Royal Sanitary Institute, London. 

807 St. Paul St. 

WILLIAM HENRY HOWELL, Ph.D., M. D., Sc. D., LL. D. 

Assistant Director and Professor of Physiology 

A. B.. Johns Hopkins University, 1881, Fellow, 1882-1884, and Ph. D., 1884 ; LL.D., 
Trinity College (Conn.), 1901; Sc. D., Yale University, 1911; M. D. (Hon.), 
University of Michigan, 1890, LL. D., 1912 ; LL. D., Washington University, 
1915 ; Assistant. Associate and Associate Professor of Biology, Johns Hopkins 
University, 1884-1889 ; Lecturer and Professor of Physiology and Histology, 
University of Michigan, 1889-1892 ; Associate Professor of Physiology, Harvard 
University, 1892-1893 ; Member of the National Academy of Sciences and of the 
American Philosophical Society ; Dean of the Medical Faculty, 1899-1911 ; 
Professor of Physiology, Medical School, 1893-1920. 

232 W. Lanvale St. 

ELMER VERNER MoCOLLUM, Ph. D., Sc. D. 

Professor of Bio-Chemistry 

A. B., University of Kansas, 1903. and A. M., 1904 ; Loomis Fellow, Yale Univer- 
sity, 1905-1906, and Ph. D., 1906 ; Sc. D., University of Cincinnati, 1920 ; 
Instructor, Assistant Professor, Associate Professor and Professor of Agricultural 
Chemistry, University of Wisconsin, 1907-1917 ; Cutter Lecturer on Hygiene and 
Preventive Medicine, Harvard University, 1917-1918 ; Member of the National 
Academy of Sciences ; Associate Member Royal Academy of Medicine of Belgium ; 
Associate Editor, Journal of Biological Chemistry and Journal of Dental Research. 

Talbot Rd., Windsor Hills. 



563] 



8 School of Hygiene and Public Health 56 1 

RAYMOND PEARL, Ph.D., Sc. D., LL. D. 

Professor of Biometry and Vital Statistics 

A. R., Dartmouth College, 1899; Ph.D., University of Michigan, 1902; Sc. D., 
Dartmouth College, 1919; LL. D., University of Maine, 1919; Instructor in 
Zoology, University of Michigan, 1902-1906 ; in the University of Pennsylvania, 
1906-1907; Biologist .of the Maine Agricultural Experiment Station, 1907-1917; 
Chief of the Statistical Division of the United States Food Administration, 
1917-1919 ; Member of the National Academy of Sciences and of the American 
Philosophical Society ; Fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences ; 
Knight of the Crown of Italy ; Associate Editor of Genetics and of the Journal of 
Experimental '/^oology ; Chairman of the Editorial Board "t the Proceeding 
the National Academy of Sciences ; Statistician of The Johns Hopkins Hospital. 

401 Hawthorn Rd., Roland Park. 

JOHN HERBERT GREGORY, S. B. 

Professor of Civil and Sanitary Engineering 

S. B., Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 1895, Hydraulic and Sanitary Engi- 
neer, 1895-1911, Consulting Sanitary Engineer, 1911 — ; Member American 
Society of Civil Engineers ; Associate Professor of Civil Engineering, Johns 
Hopkins University, 1919-1920. 

3925 Canterbury Rd., Guilford. 

WADE HAMPTON FROST, M. D., Surgeon, U. S. P. H. S.* 

Professor of Epidemiology and Head of the Departments of 

Epidemiology and Public Health Administration 

A. B., University of Virginia, 1901, and M. D., 1903; Assistant Surgeon and 
Surgeon, United States Public Health Service, 1905—; Director, Bureau of 
Sanitary Service, American Red Cross, 1917; Resident Lecturer in Epidemiology, 
Johns Hopkins University, 1919-1921. 

Tudor Hall Apartments. 

ALLEN WEIR FREEMAN, M.D., 

Resident Lecturer in Public Health Administration 

S. B., Richmond College, 1899; M. D., Johns Hopkins University, 1905; Assistant 
Commissioner of Health, Virginia. 1908-1915; Epidemiologist, U. S. Public 
Health Service, 1915-1917; Commissioner of Health of Ohio, 1917-1921. 

Guilford Manor Apartments. 

ASSOCIATE PROFESSORS 

WILLIAM WEBBER FORD, M. D., D. P. H. 

Associate Professor of Bacteriology 

A. B., Adelbert College, 1893 ; M. D., Johns Hopkins University, 1898, Instructor, 
Associate, and Associate Professor of Bacteriology, 1904-1910. Associate Professor 
of Bacteriology and Hygiene. 1910-1917 ; D. P. H., McGill University, 1900, and 
Fellow in Pathology, 1899-1901 ; Resident House Officer, Johns Hopkins Hospital, 
1898-1899 ; Fellow, Rockefeller Institute for Medical Research. 1901-1902 ; Insti- 
tute for Infectious Diseases, Berlin, 1901-1902, and Johns Hopkins University, 
1902-1903: Hygienic Institute, University of Vienna. 1912-1913; Lecturer on 
Hygiene and Epidemiology, Johns Hopkins University, 1917 — . 

Charles St. Av., Woodbrook. 



* Detailed to the School of Hygiene and Public Health by the Surgeon-General 
of the United States Public Health Service. 






56 5] Faculty 



CARROLL GIDEON BULL, M. D. 

Associate Professor of Immunology 

S. B., Peabody College, 1907 ; M. D., University of Nashville, 1909 ; Pathologist to 
Lincoln Memorial Hospital, 1910-1912 ; Assistant, Nelson Morris Institute for 
Medical Research, 1912-1913 ; Assistant and Associate in Pathology and Bacte- 
riology, The Rockefeller Institute for Medical Research, 1913-1917. 

Montgomery Road, Windsor Hills. 

LOWELL JACOB REED, Ph.D. 

Associate Professor of Biometry and Vital Statistics 

S. B. and S. M., University of Maine, 1907 and 1912, Ph. D., University of Penn- 
sylvania, 1915 ; Assistant Professor of Mathematics, University of Maine, 1915- 
1917 ; Director of Bureau of Tabulation and Statistics, War Trade Board, Wash- 
ington, 1917-1918 ; Associate in Biometry and Vital Statistics, Johns Hopkins 
University, 191S-1919. 

3409 Duvall Av., Forest Park. 

ROBERT WILLIAM HEGNER, Ph.D. 

Associate Professor of Protozoology 

S. B. and S. M., University of Chicago, 1903 and 1904 ; Ph. D., University of 
Wisconsin, 1908 ; Instructor, University of Michigan, 1908-1910, and Assistant 
Professor, 1910-1917; Johnston Scholar, Johns Hopkins University, 1917-1918; 
Associate in Protozoology, 1918-1919. 

218 Hawthorn Rd., Roland Park. 

WILLIAM WALTER CORT, Ph.D. 

Associate Professor of Hclminthology 

A. B., Colorado College, 1909 ; A. M. and Ph. D., University of Illinois, 1911 and 
1914 ; Professor of Biology, Macalester College, 1914-1916 ; Assistant Professor 
of Zoology, University of California, 1916-1919 ; Consulting Helminthologist, 
State Board of Health, California, 1918-1919 ; Associate in Helminthology, Johns 
Hopkins University, 1919-1920. 

3608 Woodbine Av., West Forest Park. 



LECTURERS 

WILLIAM TRAVIS HOWARD, M. D. 

Lecturer in Biometry and Vital Statistics 

M. D., University of Maryland, 1889 ; Graduate Student, Johns Hopkins University, 
1889-1894 ; University of Prague, 1895 ; University of Munich, 1906-1907 and 
1911 ; Professor of Pathology, Western Reserve University ; Pathologist to the 
Lakeside and City Hospitals, Cleveland, 1S94-1914 ; Bacteriologist Cleveland 
Board of Health, 1902-1914 ; Assistant Commissioner of Health, Baltimore, 1915- 
1919. 

835 University Parkway. 

JOHN SAMUEL FULTON, M. D. 

Lecturer in Public Health 

A. B., St. John's College, 1876; M. D., University of Maryland, 1881; Secretary 
Board of Health, 1898-1907; and since 1912; Professor of State Medicine, 
University of Maryland, 1900-1918 ; Secretary-General Fifth International Con- 
gress on Tuberculosis, 1908 ; Secretary- General Fifteenth International Congress 
on Hygiene and Demography, 1912 ; Fellow Royal Society of Physicians of 
Hungary ; Lieut. -Col. M. R. C, U. S. Army, Retired. 

2211 St. Paul St. 



.10 School of Hygiene and Public Health [566 

CHARLES HAMPSON JONES, M. D. 

Lecturer in Public Health 

M. B„ C. M., University of Edinborough, 1883 ; M. D. (Hon.), College of Physiciam 
and Surgeons, Baltimore, 1889 ; Commissioner of Health, Baltimore, 1898-1900 ; 
Assistant Commissioner, 1900-1915 ; Chief of Bureau of Communicable Diseases, 
State Department of Health, 1915 ; Commissioner of Health, Baltimore, 1919 : 
Professor of Hygiene and Preventive Medicine, University of Maryland and 
College of Physicians and Surgeons. 

2529 St. Paul St. 

CHARLES EDMUND SIMON, M. D. 

Lecturer in Medical Zoology 

A. B., Johns Hopkins University, 1888 ; If. D., University of Maryland, 1890 ; 
Professor of Clinical Pathology, University of Maryland and College of Physi- 
cians and Surgeons, 1908-1920; Fellow by Courtesy, Johns Hopkins University, 
1919-1920. 

1734 Linden Av. 

WILLIAM FREEMAN SNOW, M. D. 

Lecturer in Venereal Diseases 

A. B., A. M., and M. D., Stanford University, 1896-1897 and 1900 ; Instructor in 
Biology and Physiological Optics, Cooper Medical College, 1898-1900 ; Assistant 
Professor and Associate Professor of Hygiene, Stanford University, 1902-1906 ; 
Professor of Hygiene and Public Health, 1909-1920 ; State Health Commissioner 
of California, 1909-1913; General Director, American Social Hygiene Association. 
1914—. 

370 Seventh Ave., New York. 



ASSOCIATES 

GEORGE HENRY ROBINSON, Ph.D. 

Associate in Bacteriology 

A, B., Bates College, 1911; A.M., Brown University, 1912, and Ph.D., 1914; 
Research Laboratory, H. K. Mulford Company, 1914-1918. 

3017 Harlem Av. 

REYNOLD ALBRECHT SPAETH, Ph.D. 

Associate in Physiology 

S. B., Haverford College, 1909; A.M., Harvard University, 1910, and Ph. D., 1913 ; 
Sheldon Fellow, Physiological Institute, Kiel, 1913-1914 ; Instructor in Biology, 
Clark College, 1914-1915, and Yale University, 1915-1918 ; Technical Assistant in 
Pharmacology, Hygienic Laboratory, U. S. Public Health Service, 1918. 

212 Longwood Rd., Roland Park. 

JOHN RICE MINER, Sc. D. 

Associate in Biometry and Vital Statistics 

A. B., University of Michigan, 1913; Sc. D. in Hygiene, Johns Hopkins University, 
1922; Computer, Maine Agricultural Experiment Station, 1913-1917; Biometri- 
cian, Statitsical Division, U. S. Food Administration, 1917-1918. 



Towson, Md. 






567] Faculty 11 

ROSCOE RAYMOND HYDE, Ph.D. 

Associate in Immunology 

A. B. and A. M., Indiana University, 1909 ; Ph. D., Columbia University, 1915 ; 
Assistant in Embryology, Indiana University, 1908-1909 ; Assistant Professor, 
Professor and Head of Department of Zoology and Physiology, Indiana State 
Normal School, 1909-1919 ; Lecturer in Genetics, Terre Haute Veterinary College, 
1910-1918; Dyckman Fellow, Columbia University, 1912-1913; Fellow in Im- 
munology. Johns Hopkins University, 1918-1919. 

4101 Penhurst Av. 

ARTHUR LOUIS MEYER, M. D. 

Associate in Physiology 

A. B., Beloit College, 1905 ; M. D., University of Pennsylvania, 1909 ; Harvard 
Medical School, 1912-1913 ; Oxford University and Cambridge University, 1913 ; 
Assistant, Russell Sage Institute of Pathology, 1914-1915 ; Assistant and Associate, 
Rockefeller Institute for Medical Research, 1915-1919. 

1109 St. Paul St. 

JANET HOWELL CLARK, Ph.D. 

Associate in Physiology 

A. B., Bryn Mawr College, 1910 ; A. M., Johns Hopkins University, 1912, and Ph. D., 
1913 ; Huff Fellow, Bryn Mawr College, 1913-1914, and instructor in Physics, 
1914-1915 ; Sarah Berliner Fellow, 1915-1916 ; Instructor, Smith College, 1916- 
1917 ; Assistant in Pathology, Johns Hopkins University, 1917-1918 ; Instructor 
in Physiology, 1918-1919. 

232 W. Lanvale St. 

WILLIAM HAY TALIAFERRO, Ph.D. 

Associate in Protozoology 

S. B., University of Virginia, 1915 ; Assistant in Biology, Johns Hopkins Univer- 
sity, 1915-1917; Adam T. Bruce Fellow, 1917-1918; Ph. D., 1918; Johnston 
Scholar, 1919 ; Instructor in Protozoology, 1919-1920. 

1824 Bolton St. 

FRANCIS METCALF ROOT, Ph.D. 

Associate in Medical Entomology 

A. B., Oberlin College, 1911, A. M., 1912 ; Graduate Student, Johns Hopkins Univer- 
sity, 1912-1914, University Fellow, 1914-1915 ; Adam T. Bruce Fellow, 1915- 
1917, Ph. D., 1917 ; Teaching Fellow in Medical Entomology, 1919-1920. 

2320 Callow Av. 

NINA SIMMONDS, S. B. 

Associate in Bio-Chemistry 

S. B., University of Wisconsin, 1915, Assistant in Agricultural Chemistry, 1915- 
1917 ; Assistant and Instructor in Bio-Chemistry, Johns Hopkins University, 



1917-1920. 



511 JST. Wolfe St. 



LEON CLIVE HAVENS, M. D. 

Associate in Immunology 

A. B. and A. M., Colorado College, 1913 and 1914 ; M. D., Harvard University, 
1918. 

4008 Edmondson Av. 



12 School of Hygiene omd Public Health 

PERCY DAVOL MEADER, Ph.D. 
Associate in Bacteriology 

Ph. B., Sc. M. and Ph. D., Brown University, 1914, 1916 and 1918 ; Assistant 
Bacteriologist, Providence Health Department, L016-1918; Assistant and In- 
structor, Johns Hopkins University, 1918-1921. 

813 N. Howard St. 

SYLVIA LOUISE PARKER, A. B. 

Associate in Biometry and Vital Statistics 

A. B., Mount Holyoke College, 1916, and Laboratory Assistant in Zoology, 1916- 
1917; Assistant Biologist, Maine Agricultural Experiment Station, 1917-1918; 
Instructor, Johns Hopkins University, 1918-1921. 

3409 Duvall Ave., Forest Park. 

JAMES ANGUS DOULL, M. D., Dr. P. H. 

Associate in Epidemiology 

A. B. and M. D. C. M., Dalhousie University, 1911 and 1914; D. P. H., University of 
Cambridge, 1919; Provincial Inspector of Health for Nova Scotia, 1919-1920; 
Dr. P. H., Johns Hopkins University, 1921. 

3040 St. Paul St. 

MARGARET BAXTER MACDONALD, Ph.D. 

Associate in Bio-Chemistry 

A. B., Mount Holyoke College, 1898; Ph. D., Bryn Mawr College, 1902; In- 
structor, Assistant Professor and Associate Professor in Agricultural Chemistry, 
Pennsvlvania State College, 1907-1917 and Professor in Food and Nutrition, 
1917-1921. 

42 W. Biddle St. 

WYATT WILLIAM RANDALL, Ph.D. 

Associate in Bio-Chemistry 

A. B., St. John's College (Md.) 1884; Ph. D., Johns Hopkins University, 1890; 
Assistant and Associate in Chemistry, 1890-1898; Chief, Bureau of Chemistry, 
Maryland State Department of Health, 1916 — . 

10 Rugby Rd. 

RICHARD BAXTER NORMENT, Jr., M. D. 

Associate in Public Health Administration 

M. D., University of Maryland, 1914; Deputy State Health Officer (Maryland), 
1914-1917; Assistant City Health Officer, Louisville, Kentucky, 1917; Assistant 
Surgeon, U. S. Public Health Service, 1918; Acting City Health Officer, Louis- 
ville, Kentucky, 1918; Director, Washington County Public Health Unit, 1921—. 

Hagerstown, Md. 
INSTRUCTORS 

LINDA BARTELS LANGE, M. D. 
Instructor in Bacteriology 

A. B., Bryn Mawr College, 1903 ; M. D., Johns Hopkins University, 1911 ; Interne, 
New York Infirmary for Women and Children, 1911-1912 ; Fellow in Pathology 
and Bacteriology, Rockefeller Institute for Medical Research, 1912-1914 ; Pathol- 
ogist, Howard A. Kelly Hospital, Inc., 1914-1915 ; Instructor in Pathology, 
University of Wisconsin, 1915-1916 ; Assistant and Instructor in Medicine, Johns 
Hopkins University, 1916-1918; Fellow in Bacteriology, 1918-1919. 

804 N. Broadway. 



569] Faculty 13 

WILLIAM THURBER FALES, S. B., C. P. H. 

Instructor in Epidemiology 

S. B., Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 1917 ; C. P. H., School of Public 
Health of Harvard University and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 1920. 

2938 Clifton Av. 
IDA WILLIAMS PRITCHETT, A. B. 

Instructor in Immunology 

A. 13.. Bryn Mawr College, 1914; Technical Assistant, Rockefeller Institute for 
Medical Research, 1915-1917 and Fellow in Pathology and Bacteriology, 1917- 
1918; Assistant Johns Hopkins University, 1918-1919 and Fellow in Immun- 
ology, 1919-1921. 

Homewood Apts. 
HELENE CONNET WILSON, Ph.D. 

Instructor in Physiology 

A. B., Goucher College, 1915; Ph. D., Johns Hopkins University, 1920; Sarah 
Berliner Fellow, 1920-1921. 

304 W. Monument St. 

RAYMOND CLEVELAND SALTER, Sc. D. 

Instructor in Bacteriology 

S. B., University of Wisconsin, 1915; S. M., Iowa State College, 1918; Fellow in 
Bacteriology, Johns Hopkins University, 1919-1920 and Sc. D. in Hygiene, 1920; 
Chief, Bureau of Bacteriology, Maryland State Department of Health, 1920 — . 

1923 Park Av. 

SAMUEL REED DAMON, Ph.D. 

Instructor in Bacteriology 

Ph. B., A.M. and Ph.D., 'Brown University, 1916, 1917 and 1921; Assistant 
Bacteriologist, Rhode Island State Board of Health, 1920-1921; Lecturer in 
Bacteriology, Clark University, 1921. 

813 N. Howard St. 

ASSISTANTS 

CHESTER EARL RUTHERFORD 
Assistant in Biometry and Vital Statistics 

1524 Ellamont St. 

AGNES LATIMER BACON, A. B. 
Volunteer Assistant in Biometry and Vital Statistics 
A. B., Wellesley College, 1897. 

2316 N. Calvert St. 

. ETHEL MAY KINNEY, A. M. 

Assistant in Bio-Chemistry 

A. B. and A. M.. University of Kansas, 1918 and 1920 ; Research Assistant, 
University of Wyoming, 1918-1919 ; Fellow, University of Kansas, 1919-1920. 

914 E. Madison St. 



14 School of Hygiene and Public Health | 570 

DONALD LESLIE AUGUSTINE, 8.B. 

Assistant in Medical Zoology 
S. B., Macalester College, 1918, and Adjunct Professor of Biology, 1919-1920. 

V. M. a A. 
ELERY RONALD BECKER, A. B. 
Assistant in Medical Zoology 
A. B., University of Colorado, 1920. 

S13 X. Howard St. 

ABEL WOLMAN, B. 8.E. 

Assistant in Sanitary Engineering 

A. B. and B. S. E., Johns Hopkins University, 1913 and 1915; Division Engineer, 
Maryland State Department of Health, 1918; Editor, Journal American Water 
Works Association. 

1911 Eutaw Place. 

JULIA ERNESTINE BECKER, S. B. 
Assistant in Bio-Chemistry 
S. B., Cornell University, 1918; U. S. Food Administration, 1918-1919. 

4015 Brookline Av. 

WILLIAM ALBERT HOFFMAN, S. B. 

Assistant in Medical Zoology 

S. B., Cornell University, 1917; Teaching Fellow, Iowa State College, 1917-1918; 
Assistant, U. S. Bureau of Entomology, 1918-1920; Assistant State Ento- 
mologist, New York, 1920-1921. 

2118 Penrose Av. 

MARY GOVER, A.M. 

Assistant in Biometry and Vital Statistics 
A. B., Goucher College, 1913; A. M., Johns Hopkins University, 1917. 

307 E. 30th St. 

CHONG EANG LIM, M. B., Dr. P. H. 

Volunteer Assistant in Immunology 

S. B. and M. B., Hong Kong University, 1916; D. T. M., Liverpool School of 

Tropical Medicine, January, 1921; Dr. P. H., Johns Hopkins University, 1921. 

2518 Maryland Av. 



FELLOWS BY COURTESY 

Alfred James Lotka, Sc. D. 

S. B., and Sc. D., Mason College, Birmingham University lEngland), 19C1 and 
1912; A.M., Cornell University, 1909. 



625 St. Paul St. 



Samuel Taylor Darling, M. D. 



'.. D., College of Physicians and Surgeons (Bait.), 1903; Professor of Hygiene 
and Director of Hygienic Laboratories, Faculdade de Medicina e Cirurgia, Sao 
Paulo, Brazil, 1917—. 

1109 St. Paul St. 



571] Fellowships 15 



FELLOWS 

Lemmie Roscoe Cleveland. Union, Miss. 220 W. Monument St. 
S. B., University of Mississippi, 1917. Protozoology. 

BOBART William Cromwell. Center Point, Ind. 1922 Madison Av. 
A. B., Indiana State Normal School, 1917. Immunology. 

Frank Louis Kleeberger. Berkeley, Cal. Y. M. C. A. 

S. B. and A. M., University of California, 1908 and 1915. Physiology. 

Henrietta Lisk. Fort McCoy, Fla. 1610 Bolton St. 

S. B. and S. M., Florida State College, 1907 .:nd 1909; A.M., Columbia 
University, 1917. Bacteriology. 

Samuel Pitlik. Baltimore, Md. 1818 E. Baltimore St. 

A. B., Clark College, 1917; A.M., University of Chicago, 1918. Statistics. 

Bruce Dodson Reynolds. Long Island, Va. 813 N. Howard St. 

S. B., University of Virginia, 1920. Protozoology. 

ROCKEFELLER FOUNDATION" FELLOWS 

Joseph Albert Baudouin. Montreal, Canada. 

M. D. and D. P. H., Laval University, 1900 and 1912. 

Adolph Sylvester Rumreich. Pisek, 1ST. D. 2237 Mondawmin Av. 

A. B., University of North Dakota, 1917; M. D., Washington Universily, 
1920. 

Norman Rudolph Stoll. Detroit, Mich. 3709 Yosemite Av. 

S. B., Mount Union College, 1915; S. M., University of Michigan, 1918. 



INTERNATIONAL HEALTH BOARD FELLOWS 

Antonio Luiz de Barros Barreto. Rio Janeiro, Brazil. 

B. Sc. e Lett., Gymnasio of Pernambuco, 1910; Certificate in Microbiology 
and Medical Zoology, Instituto Oswaldo Cruz, Rio Janeiro, 1914; M. D., 
Faculdade de Medicina, Rio Janeiro, 1917. 

915 N. Charles St. 

Andres Castro. San Jose, Costa Rica. 1214 Madison Av. 

M. D. University of Maryland, 1921. 

Joseph Celerek. Lublin, Poland. 

M. D., University of Krakow, Poland, 1913; Chief, -State Epidemiological 
Institute, Ministry of Public Health, Lublin. 

Jaroslav J. Drbohlav. Ostrava, Czechoslovakia. 1010 Madison Av. 

M. D., University of Prague, 1917; Director, Bacteriological Laboratory, 
Ostrava. 

Enrique Enciso Ruiz. Bogota, Colombia. 1402 Eutaio Place. 

B. Ph. e Lett., Colegio Mayor del Rosario, 1911; M. D., Faculdade de Medi- 
cina, Bogota, 1919. 



16 School of Hygiene and Public Health 5 . 2 

Arminio Fraga. Rio Janeiro, Brazil. 

M. D., Bahia Medical School, 1917. 

Luis Gaitan. Guatemala, C. A. 

M. D., Guatemala University, 1900; Member of Commission against Yellow 
Fever; Inspector of Hygiene in the South Zone of Guatemala. 

Jose Guerrero. Leon, Nicaragua. 3327 Alto Av. 

B. Sc. e Lett., National Institute of Occidente, 1912; M. D., University of 
Michigan, 1919. 

Vilem Hons. Padoli by Prague, Czechoslovakia. 2332 Guilford Av. 
M. D., University of Prague, 1915. 

Charles Robert Laj&de. Salvador, C. A. 2016 Madison Av. 

B. Sc. e Lett., National Institute, Salvador, 1913; M. D., National Univer- 
sity, Salvador, 1921. 

Thomas John Le Blanc. Cheboygan, Mich. 312 W. Monument St. 
A. B. and M. S. P. H., University of Michigan, 1917 and 1920. 

Jarka Masek. Nova Paka, Bohemia. 

M. D., University of Prague, 1913. 

Fausto Robleto. Granada. Nicaragua. 740 Reservoir St. 

M. D., Universidad Angelopolitana, Mexico, 1915. 

Otto Schubert. Prague, Czechoslovakia. 1009 Madison Av. 

M. D., German University of Prague, 1919; Instructor, German University 
of Prague. 

Otokar Slanina. Brno, Moravia. St. Paul and 25th Sts. 

M. D., University of Prague, 1909. 

James Shirley Sweeney. Gainesville, Texas. 35 Talbot Rd. 

A. B. and A. M., Texas Christian University, 1917 and 1918; M. D., Vander- 
bilt University, 1921. 

Karel Urbanek. Prague. Czechoslovakia. 

M. D.. Charles University of Prague, 1911; Official, Ministry of Health. 
Prague. 

Czeslaw Wroczynski. Biala. Poland. St. Paul and 25th Sts. 

M. D., Univ.ersity of Saratow, 1915. 



STUDENTS, 1921-1922 



CANDIDATES FOR THE DECREE OF DOCTOR OF PUBLIC HEALTH 

1:1 1,N0 ABKI0L - Manila, P. I 

Antonio Lmz de Barros Babketo. Rio Janeiro, Brazil 

915 N. Charles St. 
John Collinson r> i^- 

ab , n, „„ Baltimore. 16 W. Saratoga St. 

A.B., St. Johns College, 1907; M. D., Johns Hopkins University, 1911. 

Frank Edward Couohlin. Luzerne Po Qon n- ■„ m 

s H ... .. „ „ ijuzeine, fa,. 825 Hamilton Terr. 

S. B., Lafayette College, !920 ; M. D., University of Michigan, 1921 

Archibald Shetland D E an. Woodfords, Me. 520 ff. Broadly. 
iin B s U d „i'v n er s tty! eSe ' 1918: r ° Urth Year *<"-! Student, Johns Ho P - 
( A,u. R»D»« Fol . t Worth; Tex 35 

A.B., 9 T«a, Chr.st.an University, 1921; M. D„ Bay,„ r „e dioal 0ollege> 

Knrioui : Enctso Kuiz. Bogota, Co.ombia. 1402 Eutan Place. 

Medicta t a;B C ogo e fa,° 1 9;r r M E ° Sari °' »»' M " D - Faculdade de 

Morrill L E o NA bd Ilslfy. Washington, D. C. 2227 Euta W Place. 

A.B., Colby College, 1917; M. D„ Johns Hopkins University, 1921 
A. B., Bethel College, 1896; M. D„ Vanderbilt University, 1900 

^VtrttStZ**** SalVa< ""'' »»i «■">. National Univer- 

riLLUM Cubrt Martin. Lexington, Ky . Sydenkam Hospital. 

A.B., Un.vers.ty „, Kentucky, ,916; M. D., Johns Hopkins University, 1920 

ohn William Meehan. York Neb 

'^t&ft^a^cJE ^ s ™«' «•"•■ c^ighton u„i. 

""To P ZT s i Tark To ™> Siam - 1227 *«*- a,. 

«■ L» M Chulalongkorn University, 1918 

T B Hl a C „^ A o R u LET - . Cat0 " CTilIe - " * ^toga St. 

n and M. D„ Un.vers.ty of Oklahoma, 1909 and 1913 

2 17 



18 School of Hygiene and Public Health 

Cathbyw Vedalia Riley. Washington, D. C. 1713 Fairmount Av. 

A. B., Wellesley College, 1912; S. B., Cornell University, 1916; A.M., 
Johns Hopkins University, 1916; Fourth year medical student, J. H. U. 

Adolph Silvester Rumreich. Pisek, X. Dak. 2237 Mondawmin Av. 

A. B., University of North Dakota, 1917; M. D., Washington University, 
1920. 

Louis Schapiro. New York City. Altamont Hotel. 

M. D., George Washington University, 1907; Director in Costa Rica, Inter- 
national Health Board, 1914-1921. 

James Shirley Sweeney. Gainesville, Texas. 35 Talbot Rd. 

A. B. and A.M., Texas Christian University, 1917 and 1918; M. D., Van- 
derbilt University, 1921. 

Charlotte Condict Van Winkle. Rutherford, N. J. 733 N. Br'dioay, 

A. B., Smith College, 1914; M. D., Johns Hopkins University, 1921. 

(20) 

CANDIDATES FOR THE DEGREE OF DOCTOR OF SCIENCE IN HYGIENE 

Donald Leslie Augustine. Kasson, Minn. Y. M. C. A 

S. B., Macalester College, 1918. Helminthology. 

Anna Medora Baetjer. Baltimore. 500 Roland Av. 

A. B., Wellesley College, 1920.- Physiology. 

Clennie Elsie Bailey. Terre Haute, Ind. 1608 Linden Av. 

A. B., Indiana State Normal School, 1918. Immunology. 

Elery Ronald Becker. Rocky Ford, Colo. 813 N. Howard St, 

A. B., University of Colorado, 1921. Protozoology. 

Shtjlamite Ben-Harel. Palestine. 1919 Eutaiu Place. 

A. B., Constantinople College, 1918; S. M., University of Chicago, 1922. 
Protozoology. 

Eleanor Albert Bliss. Baltimore. 1026 N. Calvert St. 

A. B., Bryn Mawr College, 1921. Bacteriology. 

Mary Jeannette Chapman. Brownsville, Tenn. 160S Linden Av. 

A. B., Randolph-Macon Woman's College, 1920. Immunology. 

Lemmie Roscoe Cleveland. Union, Miss. 220 W. Monument St. 

S. B., University of Mississippi, 1917. Protozoology. [Fellow, 1921-22.] 

Hobart William Cromwell. Center Point, Ind. 1922 Madison Av. 

A. B., Indiana State Normal School., 1917. Immunology. [Fellow, 1921-22.] 

William Thtjrber Fales. Maiden, Mass. 2936 Clifton Av 

S. B., Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 1917; C. P. H., Harvard Uni 
versity and Massachusetts Institute of Technology, School of Public 
Health, 1920; Instructor in Epidemiology, Johns Hopkins University 
Epidemiology. 

Bienvenido Maria Gonzales. Apalit, P. I. 2136 Oak St 

B. Agr., University of the Philippines, 1913; S. M., University of Wisconsir 

1915. Statistics. 



575 | Students, 1921-1922 19 

Mary Gover. Baltimore. 307 E. 30th St. 

A. B., Goucher College, 1913; A.M., Johns Hopkins University, 1917; 
Assistant in Biometry and Vital Statistics, Johns Hopkins University, 
Statistics. 

William Albert Hoffman. New York City. 2118 Penrose Av. 

S. B., Cornell University, 1917. Entomology. 

Rachel Emilie Hoffstadt. Madison, Ind. 419 E. 22nd St. 

S. B., Hanover College, 1908; S. M. and Ph. D., University of Chicago, 
1912, and 1915. Bacteriology. 

Francis Oliver Holmes. Cambridge, Mass. 230 N. Kenwood Av. 

S. B., Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 1921. Protozoology. 

Frank Louis Kleeberger. Berkeley, Cal. Y. M. C. A. 

S. B. and A.M., University of California, 1908 and 1915. Physiology. 
[Fellow, 1921-22.] 

Ethel May Kinney. Larned, Kans. 914 E. Madison St. 

A. B. and A.M., University of Kansas, 1918 and 1920; Assistant in Bio- 
Chemistry, Johns Hopkins University. Bio-Chemistry. 

Bertha Langwill. Rockford, 111. 1910 Mt. Royal Av. 

S. B., Rockford College, 1916; S. M., University of Illinois, 1918. Bac- 
teriology. 

Victor Emanuel Levine. Omaha, Neb. 312 W. Monument St. 

A. B., College of the City of New York, 1909; A. M. and Ph. D., Columbia 
University, 1911 and 1914. Bio-Chemistry. 

Henrietta Lisk. Fort McCoy, Fla. 1610 Bolton St. 

S. B. and S. M., Florida State College, 1907 and 1909; A.M., Columbia 
University, 1917. Bacteriology. [Fellow, 1921-22.] 

Claire McDowell. Baltimore. 1816 W. Baltimore St. 

A. B., Goucher College, 1917. Physiology. 

Tohn Rice Miner. Baltimore. Towson. 

A. B., University of Michigan, 1913; Associate in Biometry and Vital 
Statistics, Johns Hopkins University. Statistics. 

Edith Evelyn Nicholls. Williamsburg, Mass. 3409 Guilford Terr. 

A. B.. Smith College, 1919. Physiology. 

Samuel Pitlik. Baltimore, Md. 1818 E. Baltimore St. 

A. B., Clark College, 1917; A.M., University of Chicago, 1918. Statistics. 
[Fellow, 1921-22.] 

Horace Mann Powell. Terre Haute, Ind. 4002 Ridgewood Av. 

A. B., Indiana State Normal School, 1914. Immunology. 

da Williams Pritchett. Baltimore. Homeivood Apts. 

A. B., Bryn Mawr College, 1914; Instructor in Immunology, Johns Hopkins 
University. Immunology. 

Jruce Dodson Reynolds. Long Island, Va. 813 N. Howard St. 

8. B., University of Virginia, 1920. Protozoology. [Fellow, 1921-22.] 



20 School of Hygiene and Public Health 576 

Norman Rudolph Stoll. Detroit, Mich. 3709 Yosemite Av. 

S. B., Mount Union College, 1915; S. M., University of Michigan, 1918. 
Helminthology. 

Joseph Charles Swenarton. Washington, D. C. 1023 W. Lanvale St. 
S. B., Pennsylvania State College, 1918. Bacteriology. 

Edgar iSydenstricker. Washington, D. C. Building C, 1th and B Sts. 

A. B., Fredericksburg College, 1900; A. M., Washington and Lee University, 

1902. Epidemiology. 

Wei Sun Tao. Weisih, China. 

S. B., Columbia University 1921. Bacteriology. 

(31) 

candidates for the certificate in public health 
Andres Castro. San Jose, Costa Rica. 1214 Madison Av. 

M. D., University of Maryland, 1921. 

Frederick William Dershimer. Beaver Falls, Pa. 

M. D., Jefferson Medical College, 1915. 

William Lockwood Thornton Goodison. Larimore, N. Dak. 

M. D., Jefferson Medical College, 1909. 1Q12 Madison Av. 

Jose Guerrero. Leon, Nicaragua. 3327 Alto Av. 

B. See Lett., National Institute of Occidente, 1912; M. D., University of 

Michigan, 1919. 

William Warren Knipmeyer. Terre Haute, Ind. 

A. B., University of Missouri, 1917; M. D., Washington University, 1919. 

2237 Mondawmin Av. 

Georges Lambrichts. Liege, Belgium. 1020 N. Calvert St. 

S. B., Royal Athenee of Liege, 1910; M. D., University of Liege, 1921. 

Thomas John Le Blanc. Cheboygan, Mich. 312 W. Monument St 

A. B. and M. S. P. H., University of Michigan, 1917 and 1920. 

Jarka Masek. Nova Paka, Bohemia. 

M. D., University of Prague, 1913. 

Otakar Slanina. Brno, Moravia, St. Paul and 25th Sts. 

M. D., University of Vienna, 1909. 

Giu-Ching Ting. Chekiang, China. 1110 Madison Av. 

M. D., Chiba Medical College, 1914. 

Czeslaw Woroczynski. Biala, Poland. $f. Paul and 25th Sts. 

M. D., University of Saratow, 1915. 

(ID 

candidates for the degree of bachelor of science in hygiene 
Margaret von Torney France. Baltimore. 219 W. Lanvale St. 

A. B., Bryn Mawr College, 1919. 



577] Students, 1921-1922 21 

Martin Frobisher, Jr. Englewood, N. J. 606 N. Gilmor St. 

Student, Cornell University, 1916-17, 1919-20. 

Olive Cushing Smith. Baltimore. 4 East Biddle St. 

Student, Goucher College, 1914-16; Johns Hopkins University, 1919-20. 

Jean Chiron Snyder. Elyria. O. 3409 Guilford Terr. 

A. B., Wellesley College, 1918. 

(4) 

SPECIAL STUDENTS 

German Abadia. Bogota, Colombia. 1602 N. Payson St. 

B. Ph. e Lett., Colegio Nacional de S. Bartolome, 1910; M. D., Universidad 

Nacional de Colombia, Bogota, 1918. Bacteriology ; Chemical Hy- 
giene; Immunology ; Physiological Hygiene; Public Health Administra- 
tion; Statistics. 

Joseph Albert Baudouin. Montreal, Canada. 

M. D. and D. P. H., Laval University 1900 and 1912. Physiological Hy- 
giene; Statistics; Intensive Course. 

Julia Ernestine Becker. Baltimore. 4015 BrooJcline Av. 

S. B., Cornell University, 1918; Assistant in Bio-Chemistry, Johns Hopkins 
University. Anatomy; Chemical Hygiene. 

Albert Edward Best. Ohengtu, West China. 

A. B. and M. B., University of Toronto, 1911 and 1913. Parasitology. 

Joseph Celerek. Lublin, Poland. 

M. D., University of Krakow, Poland, 1913; Chief, State Epidemiological 
Institute, Ministry of Public Health, Lublin. Bacteriology; Immun- 
ology. 

Edwin Charles Cort. Chiengmai, Siam. 

A.M., Washington and Jefferson College, 1901; M. D., Johns Hopkins 
University, 1907. Protozoology. 

Jaroslav J. Drbohlav. Ostrava, Czechoslovakia. 1010 Madison Av. 

M. D.. University of Prague, 1917; Director, Bacteriological Laboratory, 
Ostrava. Parasitology ; Entomology. 

Charles Franklin Elvers. Baltimore. Arlington. 

Student, Maryland State College, 1915-1916. Anatomy; Histology; Path- 
ology. 

Xorris McLloyd Erb. Baltimore. 2014 N. Calvert St. 

Chemical Hygiene; Immunology. 

Bohtjslav Feirabend. Prague, Czechoslovakia. 

M. D., University of Prague, 1919. Bacteriology. (May and June, 1921.) 

Arminio Fraga. Rio Janeiro, Brazil. 

M. D., Bahia Medical School, 1917. Epidemiology; Public Health Adminis- 
tration; Venereal Diseases. 

Gabriel Garzon Cossa. Vera Cruz, Mexico. 

M. D., National University of Mexico, 1913. Bacteriology; Protozoology. 

Manuel Gutman Gichner. Baltimore, Md. 1516 Madison Av. 

A. B.. and M. D., Johns Hopkins University, 1916 and 1920. Entomology ; 
Parasitology. 



22 School of Hygiene and Public Health 

Rattansha Merwanji Hakim. Bombay, India. 1100 Madison Av. 

M. D., University of Maryland, 1920. Epidemi/iUigy ; Ihdminthology; 
Immunology ; Parasitology ; Public Health Administration. 

Vilem Hons. Padoli by Prague, Czechoslovakia. 2332 Guilford Av. 
M. D., University of Prague, 1915. Chemical Hygiene. 

Conchita Enriqueta McLean. Panama City. 2207 Guilford Av. 

Metabolism and Diet. 

Birkhead Macgowan. Baltimore. Sydenham Hospital. 

S. B., University of Tennessee, 1915; M. D., Johns Hopkins University, 1919. 
Public Health Administration. 

Shinnosuke Mori. ODarien, S. Manchuria. 5212 Harford Rd. 

M. D., Imperial University of Kyoto, Japan, 1911. Chemical Hygiene. 

Louise Eleanor Old. Los Angeles, Cal. 515 N. Wolfe St. 

Bacteriology; Immunology; Parasitology. 

Josephine Passmore. Milwaukee, Wis. 18 Midvale Rd. 

A. B., University of Wisconsin, 1921. Anatomy; Histology; Pathology. 

Fausto Robleto. Granada, Nicaragua. 746 Reservoir St. 

M. D., Universidad Angelopolitana, Mexico, 1915. Bacteriology ; Ento- 
mology; Epidemiology; Helminthology ; Physiological Hygiene; Proto- 
zoology. 

John Lewis Rosedale. London, England. 750 Reservoir St. 

A. B. and A.M., Oxford University, 1908 and 1912; Ph.D., University of 
Bonn, 1914. Chemical Hygiene. 

Otto Schubert. Prague, Czechoslovakia. 1009 Madison Av. 

M. D., German University of Prague, 1919; Instructor, German University 
of Prague. Parasitology; Immunology. 

Karel Urbanek. Prague, Czechoslovakia. 

M. D., Charles University of Prague, 1911; Official, Ministry of Health, 
Prague, Bacteriology; Immunology. 

Mildred Winchester. Holliston, Mass. 207 W. 27 th St. 

A. B., Wellesley College, 1919. Immunology. 

(25) 



STUDENTS REGISTERED FOR THE INTENSIVE COURSE FOR PUBLIC 
HEALTH OFFICERS 

John Lyell Clarke. Richmond, Va. 

Sanitary Engineer, Mississippi State Board of Health. 

Juan Sepulveda Fernando. Bulacan, P. I. 

M. D. University of the Philippines, 1914; C. P. H., Albany Medical Col- 
lege and New York State Department of Health, 1921; Medical 
Inspector, Philippine Health Service. 

Luis Gaitan. Guatemala, C. A. 

M. D., Guatemala University, 1900; Member of Commission against Yellow 
Fever; Inspector of Hygiene in the South Zone of Guatemala. 



579J Students, 1921-1922 23 

James Henry Hill. Talladega, Ala. 

M. D., Birmingham Medical College, 1909; County Health Officer for 
Talladega County; Field Agent, U. S. P. H. S. 

Fred Morrel Houghtaling. Huron, 0. 

M. D., Baltimore Medical College, 1896; Health Commissioner for Erie 
County, Ohio. 

Arthur Albertus Kirk. Tuscaloosa, Ala. 

M. D., University of Alabama, 1897; County Health Officer for Tuscaloosa 
County. 

Gilbert Everett Bobbins. Chillicothe, 0. 

M. D., Kentucky School of Medicine, 1889; Health Commissioner for Chilli- 
cothe and Ross Counties, Ohio. 

Cyrus Martin Shipp. Jackson, Miss. 

M. D., Tulane University, 1915; Director of Malarial Control Work of 
Mississippi. 

Albert Benjamin Tonkin. Cheyenne, Wyo. 

M. D., University of Colorado, 1904; State Health Commissioner of 
Wyoming. 

(9) 

students registered for the intensive course in 
medical zoology 

Arthur Sidney Bedell. Brooklyn, N. Y. 

A. B., Dartmouth College, 1909; S. B., Robert College, 1921. 

Mark Frederick Boyd. St. Paul, Minn. 

M. D. and M.S., Iowa State University, 1911 and 1913; C. P. H., Harvard 
University and Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 1914. 

Charles Raymond Cox. Baltimore, Md. 

S. B. in Hygiene, Johns Hopkins University, 1921. 

Edward Marshall Craig, jr. Hickory, N". C. 

A. B., Washington and Lee University, 1914; A. B., Yale University, 1916; 
S. B., Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 1921. 

John Franklin Docherty. Seaforth, Ontario. 

A. B. and M. B., University of Toronto, 1916 and 1920. 

William Hexry Dumont. Amsterdam, 1ST. Y. 

A. B. and S. M., Rutgers College, 1920-1921. 

Henry Adams Johnson. Newburyport, Mass. 

S. B., Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 1912. 

Edward Munroe Knights. Riverside, R. I. 

Ph. B., Brown University, 1917. 

Louva Gerhard Lenert. Austin, Texas. 

S. B., Agricultural and Mechanical College of Texas, 1906. 

Estus Hubert Magoon. Atwood, 111. 

S. B., Purdue University, 1913; S. M., Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 
1914. 

Jerome John Mildazis. Pottsville, Pa. 

C. E., Lehigh University, 1920. 



24 



School of Hygiene and Public Health | 580 



Nelson Hamilton Rector. Baltimore, Md. 

B. E., Johns Hopkins University, 1921. 
Hurbie Andrews Taylor. Kinston, N. C. 

M. D., University of Alabama, 1914. 

Walter von Dohlen Tiedeman. Schenectady, N. Y. 
B. E. and M. C. E., Union University, 1913 and 1914. 

William Weston. Columbia, S. C. 

S. B., University of South Carolina, 1921. 

David Bruce Wilson. Toronto, Ontario. 

A. B. and M. B., University of Toronto, 1916 and 1920. 



(16) 



STUDENTS REGISTERED IN THE GRADUATE SCHOOL TAKING SPECIAL 
COURSES 

Artie Fleet Barrier, s. b. Bacteriology. 

Anita Shemwell Dowell, a. b. Entomology Lectures. 

Mary Jane Hille, s. b. Anatomy ; Histology; Physiology. 



Charles Huntington Howard, a. b. 
Archibald Stuart Hunter, s. b. 
Marguerite Livingston, s. b. 
Margaret Riegel, S. B. 
Edwin Herbert Shaw, Jr., a. b. 
Edith Totten, a. m. 
Tomi Wada, a. m. 
Ging-Hsi Wang, a. b. 
Tsin-Sheng Yang, a. b. 



Bacteriology. 

Bacteriology. 

Histology. 

Metabolism and Diet. 

Bacteriology. 

Anatomy ; Histology; Physiology. 

Anatomy. 

Anatomy ; Histology ; Physiology. 

Anatomy. 
(12) 



students registered in the college courses for teachers 
taking special course in hygiene 



Irene Elizabeth Bullen, A. B. 
Teressa Fountain. 
Pearl Heaps, A. B. 
rosina coblens joseph. 
Hilda Anna Louise Kratsch. 
Edith Grace Rice, S. B. 
Catherine Diggs Schnepfe. 



Anne Christine Shamburger. 
Blanche Smith. 
Minnie Cecelia Smith. 
Clara May Spielman. 
honora talbott. 
Elizabeth Lenore Wild. 

(13) 



581] Students, 1921-1922 25 



SUMMAEY 

Candidates for the degree of Dr. P. H 20 

Candidates for the degree of Sc. D. in Hygiene 31 

Candidates for the Certificate in Public Health 11 

Candidates for the degree of S. B. in Hygiene 4 

Special Students including students in the Intensive Courses 75 



141 



26 School of Hygiene and Public Health. 582 



ADVISORY BOARD OF THE FACULTY 

Frank J. Goodnow, President 

Carroll G. Bull Robebi W. Hegneb 

William W. Ford William H. Howell 

Allen W. Freeman Assistant Director 

Wade H. Frost Elmer V. McCollum 

John H. Gregory Raymond Pearl 

William H. Welcii, Director 

By resolution of the Board of Trustees this Board is " instructed 
to report to the Trustees from time to time their suggestions and to 
prepare and carry forward the proper arrangements for the instruc- 
tion and graduation of students in the School." 

EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE 

The President of the University 
The Director The Assistant Dibectoh 

LIBRARY COMMITTEE 

Elmer V. McCollum George H. Robinson 

Chairman Reynold A. Spaeth 

Lowell J. Reed Elisabeth S. Thies 

The Librarian of the University, ex officio 

COMMITTEE ON APPLICATIONS 

Carroll G. Bull Robert W. Hegner 

William W. Ford William H. Howell 

Chairman 

COMMITTEE ON PUBLICATIONS 

Robert W. Hegner William H. Howell 

Chairman Raymond Pearl 

OTHER OFFICERS 

Mary Louise Durham, Secretary 1700 St. Paul St. 

Elisabeth S. Thies, Librarian 2122 Chelsea Av. 

Ethel Norris, Artist 10 W. 25th St. 



GENERAL STATEMENT AND 
REQUIREMENTS FOR ADMISSION 



SCHOOL OF HYGIENE AND PUBLIC HEALTH 



GENERAL STATEMENT 

The need of larger and better opportunities in this coun- 
try for training and investigation in the science and art of 
Hygiene and Public Health has long been recognized. With 
the rapid advance in our knowledge of the causes and mode 
of spread of infectious diseases has come a correspondingly 
increased power of prevention which has greatly stimulated 
interest in preventive medicine and has strengthened the de- 
mands for improved standards of public health organization 
and administration. Especially urgent is the need for men 
and women trained to undertake work in this field which al- 
ready offers attractive careers for those properly qualified, and 
will offer opportunities in larger measure as the necessity for 
such training is more widely appreciated. It was a source of 
great gratification to the Johns Hopkins University to be 
enabled to open in October, 1918, a School of Hygiene and 
Public Health designed to meet the need thus briefly in- 
dicated. 

In June, 1916, the Eockefeller Foundation of New York 
notified the President of the Johns Hopkins University that 
the Foundation was prepared " to co-operate with the Uni- 
versity in the establishment of a School of Hygiene and Pub- 
lic Health for the advancement of knowledge and the train- 
ing of investigators, teachers, officials and other workers in 
these fields." 

This offer was accepted by the University, and on June 
12, 1916, the President of the University made the formal 
announcement that the Board of Trustees had authorized the 
establishment of a School of Hygiene and Public Health as 
'part of the University. Dr. William H. Welch was appointed 
585] 29 



30 School of Hygiene and Public lleallk [_5&0 

Director and Dr. William H. Howell was named to assist in 
the work of organization. 

The history of the events leading up to this action is in 
brief as follows: On October 16, 1914, the General Educa- 
tion Board called a conference of leading authorities in public 
health work to consider the general question of the training 
of qualified sanitarians and public health officials. At the 
request of this conference Dr. W. H. Welch and Mr. Wickliffe 
Rose undertook to prepare a plan for an institute of public 
health and hygiene for submission to the General Educa- 
tion Board and the members of the conference. This report 
was made to the General Education Board on May 27, 1915. 
Subsequently, on the instruction of the Board, a committee 
was appointed to determine where such an institution could 
be located most advantageously. Acting upon the informa- 
tion gathered by this committee the Rockefeller Foundation 
decided " largely by reason of the facilities, organization and 
ideals of its Medical School," to establish a School of Hygiene 
and Public Health at the Johns Hopkins University. 

The main objects of the School are to establish courses 
for the training of qualified persons for public health work, to 
promote investigative work in hygiene and preventive medi- 
cine and provide opportunities for the training of investiga- 
tors in these subjects, and to develop adequate means for the 
dissemination of sound hygienic knowledge. Special and 
mutual advantages arise from the close relationship between 
the School and the International Health Board of the 
Rockefeller Foundation, particularly in field work and in 
the opportunities for investigation and training in tropical 
medicine and the control of special diseases. As outlined at 
present the work of the School is organized under the follow- 
ing divisions: a department of bacteriology, serology and 
immunology; a department of medical zoology; a depart- 
ment of epidemiology and public health administration; a 
department of biometry and vital statistics ; a department of 
chemical hygiene; a department of physiological hygiene; a 



587] Courses and Degrees 31 

department of sanitary engineering. Provision is made for 
instruction in personal hygiene ; mental and social hygiene 
and sanitary law. Facilities for field work are provided 
through co-operation with the State and City departments 
of health and also by means of a County Health Unit located 
at Hagerstown, Washington County. This Unit is supported 
by four public health agencies, the State Department of 
Health, the U. S. Public Health Service, the International 
Health Board, and the School of Hygiene and Public Health. 
Students spend part of their time in residence at Hagerstown 
to become acquainted with the organization and activities of 
this unit. 

A suitable lot of land has been purchased at the corner 
of Monument and Wolfe streets, immediately adjacent to 
the grounds of the Medical School and the Johns Hopkins 
Hospital. Plans have been made for the erection of build- 
ings upon this lot to contain the laboratories, library, mu- 
seum and offices of the School. Pending the erection of these 
buildings the School has been established in a large laboratory, 
310-312 West Monument street, formerly occupied by the 
physical department of the Johns Hopkins University. 
This building and some of the adjacent laboratories have been 
completely renovated and equipped for the use of the School. 
Instruction began October 1, 1918. 

COURSES AND DEGREES 

I. Course leading to the degree of Doctor of Public 
Health (Dr. P. H.) : 

The course consists of specified work throughout two 
years, together with a summer spent in field work in some 
organized public health service. The specified work consists 
in the satisfactory completion of a certain number of required 
and elective courses. Courses are required in Bacteriology, 
Immunology, Chemical Hygiene, Physiological Hygiene, Sani- 
tary Engineering, Parasitology, Statistics, Epidemiology and 



32 School of Hygiene and Public Health [588 

Public Health Administration. The electiye courses may be 

selected according to the needs of the individual student, 
either to broaden his instruction or to specialize to some 
extent by doing advanced work in some one department. 
The details of these courses are described in the section on 
Schedules (p. 69). An essay based upon individual study 
of some problem or subject in hygiene is to be submitted 
before receiving the degree. The following groups of students 
will be accepted as candidates for this degree: 

a. Graduates of approved medical schools who have had a 

liberal education as evidenced by a degree in arts or 
science, or its equivalent. These candidates will be 
required to pursue a two-years' course together with 
one summer of practical work in an organized public 
health service. 

b. Students who have completed satisfactorily three years 

of the course in an approved medical school and who 
have had a liberal education as evidenced by a degree 
in arts or science, or its equivalent, may be accepted 
as candidates for this degree while completing the 
course in medicine. Arrangements have been made 
with the Johns Hopkins Medical School whereby a 
student may receive his degree in medicine on the 
completion of four years of work, and his degree in 
public health after an additional or fifth year of 
work in the School of Hygiene and Public Health, 
together with a summer spent in practical field work. 
In their fourth year these students may fill all of 
their elective hours with subjects taken from the 
curriculum of the School of Hygiene and Public 
Health. A combined course of a similar character 
may be obtained with other medical schools by special 
arrangement. 

II. Courses leading to the degree of Doctor of Science in 
Hygiene : 

The underlying object in the arrangement of these courses 



589] Courses and Degrees 33 

is to train specialists in the various departments of public 
health work, and to afford an opportunity for those not gradu- 
ated in medicine to take part in such work. The candidate is 
expected to absolve certain courses of a basic character, but 
for the most part his time is devoted to advanced work in 
some one department. This work must include a special 
investigation of some problem the results of which are to 
be presented in the form of a dissertation. In view of the 
special requirements and the time implied in completing 
successfully a definite research, it may be assumed that after 
obtaining the bachelor's degree at least three years of work 
will be necessary to meet all the requirements of the degree 
of Doctor of Science in Hygiene. 

To be accepted as a candidate for this degree the following 
requirements must be fulfilled. 

a. A degree in arts or science or its equivalent, as evidence 

of a liberal education. 

b. Certificates of the satisfactory completion of adequate 

courses in chemistry, physics, and biology. 

c. Certificates of the satisfactory completion of adequate 

courses in anatomy, physiology, and pathology. 

d. In exceptional cases, on the recommendation of the head 

of a department, a candidate may be accepted who 
offers in place of (c) satisfactory evidence of special 
training of an advanced character in subjects funda- 
mental to his main field of work. 

After acceptance as a candidate the student will be assigned 
for advice and guidance to the head of the department in 
which he will specialize. In order to be recommended for the 
degree the candidate must pass satisfactory written and oral 
examinations in his major subject and must present a dis- 
sertation, in prescribed form, embodying the results of an 
independent investigation. This dissertation must be pre- 
sented to the Director, who will refer it for examination to 
a special committee. If the report of the committee is favor- 



34 School of Hygiene and Public I lea Ilk (500 

able the candidate will be asked to appear before the faculty 
for the oral examination. The dissertation must be published 
in whole or in part within a year after its acceptance by the 
faculty. 

III. Course leading to a Certificate in Public Health : 

A certificate in public health may be awarded to qualified 
persons after one year of residence and the satisfactory com- 
pletion of lectures and laboratory courses equivalent in amount 
to the work of a full academic year. The courses followed 
must include practical work in bacteriology, sanitary engi- 
neering, statistics and epidemiology and in such other courses 
as may be approved by the faculty. 

Candidates for these certificates must be graduates in medi- 
cine of an approved medical school or graduates in arts or 
science who can furnish satisfactory evidence of previous 
training in the physical and medical sciences. Qualified 
public health officers or physicians who are not able to give 
an entire year to this work may complete the course and 
obtain the certificate by taking the trimesters separately 
during two or more years. 

IV. Course leading to the degree of Bachelor of Science 
in Hygiene: 

The course requires two years of work taken partly in the 
School of Hygiene and Public Health and partly in the Medi- 
cal School. The first year's work consists of courses in 
anatomy, histology, physiology, bacteriology, physiological 
hygiene and personal hygiene. The second year's work con- 
sists of courses in sanitary engineering or statistics, chemical 
hygiene, immunology, parasitology, pathology and dietetics. 
The arrangement of these courses is such as to permit some 
specialization. The requirements for matriculation in this 
course are as follows: 

a. Certificate of matriculation in an approved college and 
the completion of at least two years of college work. 



591] Courses and Degrees 35 

b. Certificates of adequate courses in biology, physics, and 
chemistry, including organic chemistry. 

By an adequate course is meant in physics one year of col- 
lege work covering approximately 100 hours of laboratory and 
100 hours of class work; in biology one year of college work 
covering approximately 150 hours of laboratory and 100 hours 
of class work; in chemistry one to two years of college work 
covering approximately 250 hours of laboratory and 120 hours 
of class work. 

V. Intensive Course for Public Health Officers : 

This course is offered during the first six weeks of the 
winter trimester. For the session of 1922-1923 it begins 
January 2d and ends February 10th. It is intended to meet 
the needs of public health officers wishing to increase their 
knowledge of hygiene and public health; and of physicians 
proposing to enter into public health work who find it im- 
practicable to devote a year or two years to a full course of 
instruction. 

The course of instruction consists of laboratory exercises, 
lectures, conferences and field demonstrations. Students in 
the intensive course will be permitted to register for any 
regular course given in the second trimester provided they 
have had the necessary preparation and that the course is not 
already filled. The schedule will permit taking either Bac- 
teriology I or Immunology I on Monday, Wednesday and 
Friday morning and either Helminth ology or Epidemiology I 
on Tuesday, Thursday and Saturday. Two such courses will 
occupy the whole of the forenoon for the entire course. 

Of the afternoon courses, students in the course will be 
required to take the conferences in Public Health Problems 
on Monday and Wednesday, 2-4 p. m. and the lectures on 
Selected Topics in Hygiene on Wednesday at 4.30 p. m. • The 
remainder of the afternoon hours will be occupied by special 
lecture courses designed to cover topics of general interest 



36 School of Hygiene and Public Health | 502 

in Physiological Hygiene, Food and Nutrition, and Public 
Health Law and by field demonstrations of the various forms 
of health activity carried on in Baltimore and the vicinity by 
public and private agencies. 

The fee for the courses is $50.00, payable or registration. 

VI. Intensive Course in Medical Zoology: 

This is a short course lasting three weeks and planned to 
meet the needs of public health officers interested especially 
in animal parasites and parasitic diseases. The time of the 
year at which it is offered may vary and will be announced 
definitely at the beginning of each academic year. The work 
consists of lectures, conferences and laboratory exercises occu- 
pying the entire time of the three weeks. While consideration 
is given to practically all the animal forms that cause disease 
or disseminate disease-producing organisms, the principal 
topics discussed are hookworm disease, malaria, mosquitoes, 
and fecal diagnosis. The fee for the course is $25.00 payable 
on registration. 

SPECIAL STUDENTS 

An opportunity to use the facilities of the School will be 
granted to the following groups of special students not regis- 
tered as candidates for a degree : 

1. Public health officers who may wish to take one or more 

lecture or laboratory courses, or engage in the study 
of some special problem. 

2. Other qualified persons who may wish to attend special 

courses or undertake research work and whose quali- 
fications receive the formal approval of the faculty 
of the School. 



593] De Lamar Lectures in Hygiene 37 



THE DE LAMAR LECTURES IN HYGIENE 

A series of popular lectures in personal and public hygiene 
is arranged each session. The object of these lectures 
is to bring before the public the general facts and points of 
view of modern hygiene, with the hope that in this way the 
School may serve as a center for the distribution of useful 
knowledge in all matters pertaining to sanitation and pre- 
ventive medicine. These lectures are supported from the 
fund bequeathed to the Medical School by Joseph E. De 
Lamar. 

The course given during the session of 1921-1922 was as 
follows : 

J. W. SCHERESCHEWSKY, M. D. 

Assistant Surgeon-General, United States Public Health Service 

on 

The Morbid Changes Caused by Variations in Barometric Pressure 

Monday, October 24 



Robert McCarrison, M. D., D. Sc. 

Lieutenant-Colonel, Indian Medical Service 

on 

Faulty Food in Relation to Gastro-Intestinal Disorders 

Monday, November 14 



S. Josephine Baker, M. D. 
Director, Bureau of Child Hygiene, Department of Health, New York 

on 

The Place of Child Hygiene in a Public Health Program 

Monday, November 28 



W. S. Leathers, M. D. 

Executive Officer, Mississippi State Board of Health 

on 

Fundamental Policies Involved in Public Health Administration 

Monday, December 12 



38 School of Hygiene and Public Health [594 

Paul A. Lewis, M. D. 

Director, Henry Phipps Institute, Philadelphia 

on 

Natural Immunity to Tuberculosis 

Monday, December 19 



Edward M. East, Ph. D. 
Professor of Experimental Plant Morphology, Harvard University 

on 

The Population Problem in its Relation to Public Health 

Monday, January 16 



Clemens Pirquet, M. D. 
Professor of Diseases of Children, University of Vienna, Austria 

on 

Nutritional Treatment of Tuberculosis in Childhood 

Monday, January 23 



Edwin 0. Jordan, Ph. D. 

Professor of Bacteriology, University of Chicago 

on 

Interepidemic Iufluenza 

Monday, January 30 



Roger I. Lee, M. D. 

Professor of Hygiene, Harvard University 

on 

The Physical Examination of Large Groups of Individuals: 

Its Importance, Limitations and Opportunities 

Monday, February 6 



Ellsworth Huntington, Ph. D. 

Research Associate in Geography, Yale University 

on 

Climate, Health and Civilization 

Monday, February 13 



595] Be Lamar Lectures in Hygiene 39 

Joseph Barcroft, F. R. S. 

Fellow of King's College, Cambridge, England 

on 

Physiology of Life in the Andes 

Tuesday, February 21 



Otto R. Eichel, M. D. 
Director, Division of Vital Statistics, State Department of Health, 

New York 

on 

The Interest of the Physician and the Social Worker in Vital 

Statistics 

Monday, March 20 



G. W. McCoy, M. D. 
Director, United States Hygienic Laboratory, Washington 

on 

Plague 

Monday, April 3 



Brayton H. Ransom, Ph. D. 

Chief of the Zoological Division, Bureau of Animal Industry, 

U. S. Department of Agriculture 

on 

The Hygienic Importance of Recent Discoveries on Ascariasis 

Monday, April 24 



John Paxil Lotsy, Ph. D. 
Research Fellow, Dutch Society of Sciences, Holland 

on 

The Species-concept in Evolution and Hybridization 

Monday, May 1 



Course in General Hygiene. In addition to this series of 
lectures a special course of lectures in general hygiene has 
been arranged for the summer course of the Johns Hopkins 



40 School of Hygiene and Public Health 

University, given at Homewood in July and August. This 

course is given under the direction of Doctor Freeman, and 
is supported from the De Lamar Fund. 

SCHOLARSHIPS 

Twelve scholarships carrying free tuition may be awarded 

annually by the Trustees of the University upon the recom- 
mendation of the Faculty. The scholarships are granted for 
one year, but may be renewed for a second year. Applica- 
tions for these scholarships will be acted upon in April and 
December of each session, and candidates should apply to 
the Director of the School before April 1st or December 1st. 

FELLOWSHIPS 

Nine fellowships are awarded annually by the Trustees of 
the University upon the recommendation of the Faculty. 
They are granted for one year but may be renewed for a 
second year. These fellowships fall into two classes. 

I. Three Eesearch Fellowships. Each fellowship carries 
an annual stipend of $1,000 and exemption from all tuition 
fees. The conditions of award are as follows : 

1. The applicant must have received his doctor's degree in 

medicine, science, philosophy or public health, or must 
have conducted and published a meritorious investi- 
gation. 

2. The holder of a fellowship must give his time primarily 

to investigative work approved by some member of the 
staff of the School, and must be in residence during the 
academic year unless permission is granted by the 
faculty to carry on his work elsewhere. 

II. Six fellowships carrying each a stipend of $500 a 
year and exemption from all tuition fees. These fellowships 
may be awarded to graduate students who are candidates for 



597] Publications — Register and Calendar 41 

the degree of Doctor of Science. Preference will be given to 
those applicants who are already students in the School. 
Holders of these fellowships must be in residence during the 
academic year unless special permission is obtained from the 
faculty to work elsewhere. 

Applications for either class of fellowships should be made 
in writing to the Director of the School before March 1st. 

PUBLICATIONS 

The annual catalogue and announcement is issued as the 
April number of The Johns Hopkins University Circular. 

In June the researches published during the academic year 
by members of the staff and advanced students are bound 
and issued as a volume of Collected Papers. The first volume 
of this series appeared in June, 1920. These volumes are dis- 
tributed to public health laboratories and are on sale to indi- 
viduals. 

The American Journal of Hygiene supported by an appro- 
priation from the De Lamar bequest to the Medical School 
is published by the Johns Hopkins Press. Dr. W. H. Welch 
is Editor and Dr. Charles E. Simon Managing Editor. The 
journal is devoted to the publication of investigations in hy- 
giene by workers in this country and abroad. The laboratory 
and field researches carried on in the School appear for the 
most part in this journal. Monographs on special subjects 
pertaining to hygiene and preventive medicine will be issued 
from time to time as supplementary numbers cf this journal. 
For further information address the Managing Editor, School 
of Hygiene and Public Health, 310-312 W. Monument Street. 

REGISTRATION AND CALENDAR 

All students upon entering must report at the Director's 
office for registration and payment of fees. 

The academic year is the same as in other departments of 
the University. 



4-2 School of Hygiene and Public Health [598 

Instruction begins in the fall on the Tuesday nearest to 
the first of October. The graduating exercises are held on 
the second Tuesday of June. There are short recesses at 
Christmas and Easter. 

Since instruction is arranged on a trimestral basis, it is 
possible for candidates for the degree of Doctor of Public 
Health or Doctor of Science in Hygiene to enter the School 
at the beginning of any trimester, and to graduate at the end 
of any trimester. Formal bestowal of degrees takes place at 
the University Commencement in June and on Commemora- 
tion Day, February 22nd. 

TUITION 

The charge for tuition in the courses leading to a degree 
or a certificate is $250 per annum, payable at the office of the 
Director in three instalments, one at the beginning of each 
trimester. For students taking special courses the charge 
for one trimestral course, including laboratory work, is $50.00. 
The charge for shorter courses will be arranged on application. 



For further information address the Director of the School 
of Hygiene and Public Health, Johns Hopkins University, 
310-312 W. Monument Street, Baltimore, Md. 



DEPARTMENTS OF INSTRUCTION AND 
ANNOUNCEMENT OF COURSES 



DEPARTMENTS OF INSTRUCTION 



BACTERIOLOGY 

William W. Ford, M. D., Associate Professor. 
(George H. Robinson, Ph. D., Associate. 
Percy D. Meader, Ph. D., Associate. 
Linda B. Lange, M. D., Instructor. 
Raymond C. Salter, Sc. D., Instructor. 
Samuel R. Damon, Ph. D., Instructor. 

1. Sanitary Bacteriology. Bacteriology 1. Credit one 
major. Dr. Meader, Dr. Damon. This conrse is designed to 
give students a fundamental training in bacteriology with 
special reference to sanitary bacteriology. It includes the 
making of the ordinary culture media, the preparation and 
use of stains, the microscopic study of organisms, and the 
methods of isolating and identifying the more common patho- 
genic and non-pathogenic bacteria. The methods of exam- 
ining water, milk, sewage, and foods are considered in detail. 

Students who have received training in chemistry, physics, 
and biology, are admitted to this course, and its completion 
qualifies students for the course in public health bacteriology. 

2. Public Health Bacteriology. Bacteriology 2. Credit 
one major. Dr. Ford, Dr. Eobinson, Dr. Lange. This course 
is designed especially for the training of students in the 
modern bacteriological methods employed in the diagnosis 
of the acute respiratory diseases, in the study of the infections 
of the intestinal tract, in genito-urinary infections and in 
the examination of water, milk, and foods for their sanitary 
quality. It includes the study of the pneumococcus, the 
influenza bacillus and the hemolytic streptococcus from 
sputum, the diphtheria bacillus from the secretions of the 
nose and throat, the meningococcus from the spinal fluid, 
and the etiological agents in gonorrhoea and syphilis. The 
newer methods for the cultivation of the tubercle bacillus 

45 



46 School of Hygiene and Public Health [602 

from sputum are demonstrated, and the isolation of the 
typhoid, paratyphoid, and dysentery bacilli is practiced as 
far as possible upon actual cases of disease. The standard 
methods employed in the examination of water, milk, and 
food are also included. Only those students will be admitted 
to this course who can present satisfactory evidence of proper 
training in elementary bacteriology. 

3. Public Health Laboratory Practice. Bacteriology 
3. Credit one major. Dr. Salter. (Limited to six students — 
Prerequisite Bacteriology II). This course is designed to 
give students an opportunity to do the routine work of a 
public health bacteriological laboratory. Practice is offered 
in the bacteriological diagnosis of diphtheria, tuberculosis, 
typhoid fever, gonorrhoea, syphilis, pneumonia and rabies. 
The bacteriological examination of water, milk, canned goods, 
and feces, urine and blood is also carried out. The students 
will have opportunities to make reports, file records and be- 
come familiar with the problem of laboratory management. 

4. Spiroohaetes and Venereal Infections. Bacteri- 
ology 4. Credit one-half major. Dr. Eobinson. This course 
is intended to acquaint the student with the methods of 
isolating, cultivating and identifying the spirochaetes of 
syphilis, yellow fever, infectious jaundice, etc. The organisms 
will be studied by means of dark field illumination, stained 
preparations and infected tissue. In addition the microscopic 
diagnosis of venereal infections will be undertaken with 
reference to the organization and management of venereal 
disease clinics. The course is offered in the session of 1922- 
1923 from 9 a. m. to 1 p. m. during the last half of the 
second trimester. 

5. Methods of Cultivating and Identifying Anae- 
robic Bacteria. Bacteriology 5. Credit one-half major. 
Dr. Meader. This course is designed to acquaint the student 
with the various methods of cultivating and studying the 
anaerobic bacteria with special reference to those pathogenic 
to man. The application of anaerobic methods to the study 



003] Departments of Instruction 47 

of food decomposition will also be demonstrated. The course 
will consist of lectures, conferences and assigned laboratory 
work. This course is offered during the session of 1922-1923 
for two afternoons in the third trimester. 

6. Physiology of the Bacteria. Bacteriology 6. Credit 
one-half major. Dr. Salter. This course is designed to give 
a more detailed account of the physiological aspects of bac- 
terial life than is possible in a general course. A study will 
be made of the methods employed in the investigation of those 
physiological problems which are becoming more and more 
abundant in modern bacteriology. Among other subjects, the 
facts and theories regarding the following will be considered : 

The physico-chemical laws governing the growth and death 
of micro-organisms; the determination of the chemical com- 
position of bacterial cells; bacterial enzymes and their ac- 
tivity; the chemical reactions involved in bacterial meta- 
bolism; the energy transformations in bacterial decomposi- 
tion; quantitative and qualitative determination of products 
of bacterial metabolism ; hydrogen ion determination by elec- 
trometric and colorimetric methods. During the session of 
1922-1923 this course is offered for two afternoons in the 
first trimester. 

7. Eesearch in Bacteriology. Dr. Ford. Opportunity 
will be provided for advanced work and research in bacter- 
iology in a variety of fields. Qualified students will be given 
problems to work out under the immediate supervision of the 
Associate Professor of Bacteriology, and opportunities will 
be offered to candidates for advanced degrees to prepare theses 
on special topics. 

IMMUNOLOGY 

Carroll G. Bull, M. D., Associate Professor. 

Roscoe R. Hyde, Ph. D., Associate. 

Leon C. Havens, M. D., Associate. 

Ida W. Pritchett, A. B., Instructor. 

Chong Eang Lim, M. B., Dr. P. H., Volunteer Assistant. 

1. Immunology 1. Credit one major. Dr. Hyde. This 



48 School of Hygiene and Public Health 

course is designed for those who have not had previous train- 
ing in serological reactions and the principles of immunology. 
Twelve hours a week are devoted to laboratory work, Lectures 

and conferences. The laboratory work gives practical train- 
ing in (1) the various serological reactions, viz.: agglutina- 
tion reactions, with bacteria and animal cells; precipitin 
reactions, particularly for the identification of unknown 
bloods; complement fixation reactions, the Wassermann reac- 
tion and the fixation of complement with bacterial antigens ; 
opsonic titrations, etc., (2) the preparation of the materials 
used in serological reactions, (3) the preparation of vaccines, 
and (4) the production and standardization of immune sera, 
antimicrobic and antitoxic. Special attention is given to 
practical diagnostic methods. 

2. Immunology 2. Credit one major. Dr. Havens. 
This course is open to recent medical graduates and others 
who have had some training in serological methods and the 
principles of immunity. The work is divided into three 
parts; (1) serological reactions (see Immunology 1), (2) 
experimental work designed to illustrate the manner in 
which pathogenic organisms produce their pathologic effects 
and how the host defends itself against invading organisms, 
and (3) the preparation of a written review of the literature 
on some subject germane to the course and of current interest. 

3. Immunology 3. Special Courses. Dr. Bull and 
Miss Pritchett. Prerequisite, Immunology 1 or 2 or their 
equivalents. Each course is planned to meet the needs of 
the individual classes, the credit granted depending upon 
the work accomplished. Work is offered on different phases 
of serology and immunology. The one-half major course 
on diphtheria will serve to illustrate the nature of the special 
courses. This course is as follows: (1) the preparation of 
toxin for the Schick test, (2) the standardization of diph- 
theria antitoxin, (3) the preparation of toxin-antitoxin for 
the active immunization of children, and (4) the estimation 
of small quantities of diphtheria antitoxin. Arrangements 
may be made to do the work in the afternoons of any trimester. 



605] Departments of Instruction 40 

4. Opportunities are offered to candidates for advanced 
degrees to do this work under the direction of different mem- 
bers of the staff. 

SANITARY ENGINEERING 

John H. Gregory, S. B., Professor of Civil and Sanitary Engineering. 
Abel Wolman, A. B. and B. S. E., Assistant in Sanitary Engineering. 

The course in sanitary engineering is given at Homewood 
in the Department of Civil Engineering, and will consist of 
twelve hours a week, during one trimester, divided into lec- 
tures, conferences, laboratory and field work, supplemented by- 
reading. The course is designed to give the student a com- 
prehensive general view of modern sanitary engineering 
practice. In addition to the main topics of water supply, 
water purification, sewerage and sewage disposal, together 
with a discussion of modern methods for the collection and 
disposal of garbage and other municipal wastes, the subject 
of environmental sanitation, with particular reference to its 
engineering phases, is presented. The laboratory exercises 
will include the study and discussion of existing sanitary 
works from photographs, lantern slides and working drawings, 
together with inspection trips in the field to typical water 
purification, sewage disposal and other sanitary works. 

CHEMICAL HYGIENE 

Elmer V. McColltjm, Ph.JX, Sc. D., Professor. 
Wyatt W. Randall, Ph. D., Associate. 
Margaret B. MacDonald, Ph. D., Associate. 
Nina Simmonds, 6. B., Associate. 
Ethel M. Kinney, A. M., Assistant. 
J. Ernestine Becker, S. B., Assistant. 

1. Chemistry of Food, Water, etc. — Chemical 

Hygiene 1. Credit one major. Dr. W. W. Eandall. The 

course consists of laboratory work, lectures and conferences, 

12 hours per week during one trimester. The laboratory 

3 



50 School of Hygiene a/nd Public Health [606 

work includes the technic of food and water analysis, the 
detection of adulterants, and the exercise of Government con- 
trol over food products which enter into commerce. The 
object of the course is to familiarize students with t\ut 
chemical methods employed in food laboratories and heal I h 
departments. 

2. Chemistry of Metabolism. Chemical Hygiene 
2. Credit one major. Dr. Margaret B. MacDonald. This 
course consists of 12 hours laboratory work, with confer- 
ences, during one trimester. It deals with methods used 
for the study of metabolism. The student is given practice 
in methods for the analysis of blood, urine and feces. Special 
attention is given to the interpretation of analytical data. 
The conferences will consist of reports on selected topics in 
metabolism. Students who have satisfactorily completed 
Chemical Hygiene 1 are eligible to this course. 

3. Metabolism and Diet. Chemical Hygiene 3. Dr. 
E. V. McCollum. Three lectures or conferences weekly 
during one trimester. In this course will be given assigned 
readings. The more important researches which have con- 
tributed to present-day knowledge in this field are presented. 
The results of animal experimentation are correlated with 
human experience as far as possible. The special dietary 
properties of our natural food products are discussed and 
the evidence of the relation between the diet and health of 
certain large groups of people is presented. 

4. Experimental Methods. Chemical Hygiene L 
Credit one-half major. Miss Simmonds. This course will 
provide an opportunity for students who expect to become 
investigators to become familiar with the experimental 
methods used in this and other laboratories for the study of 
problems of nutrition. 

It will afford a demonstration of the effects of specific 
faults in. the diet on the nutrition of the rat as exhibited in 
the development of one or another so-called deficiency disease, 
the effects on the nervous system, and other criteria by means 



GOT] Departments of Instinction 51 

of which one can interpret the effects of malnutrition. The 
course will be open only to students who are prepared to 
benefit by it. 

Instruction will be given by assigned readings, and the 
preparation of reports. There will be one conference weekly 
during one trimester. 

5. Eeseakch. Chemical Hygiene 5. Dr. E. V. McCol- 
lum and Dr. Margaret B. MacDonald. Those who have the 
necessary preliminary training and who desire to do work of 
special nature will be received at any time during the aca- 
demic year. 

MEDICAL ZOOLOGY 

Robert W. Hegner, Ph. D., Associate Professor of Protozoology. 
William W. Cort, Ph. D., Associate Professor of Hehninthology. 
William H. Taliaferro, Ph. D., Associate in Protozoology. 
Francis M. Root, Ph. D., Associate in Medical Entomology. 
Charles E. Simon, M.D., Lecturer in Medical Zoology. 
Donald L. Augustine, S. B., Assistant in Helminthology. 
Elery R. Becker, A. B., Assistant in Protozoology. 
William A. Hoffman, S. B., Assistant in Medical Entomology. 

Medical Zoology is the study of animals that cause human 
disease, are of direct injury to man, or that disseminate dis- 
ease producing organisms. It may be divided conveniently 
into three sections, Protozoology, Helminthology, and Medi- 
cal Entomology. From a public health standpoint, the most 
important species of protozoa and helminths are those para- 
sitic and pathogenic to man. The phenomena presented by the 
parasitic species, however, can only be interpreted on the basis 
of a knowledge of free living species or those living in lower 
animals which are accessible for both observational and ex- 
perimental studies. Emphasis is placed on the medical 
aspects of the invasion of man by parasitic animals. The 
insects and related organisms of public health interest act 
mostly as carriers of pathogenic organisms from diseased to 
healthy persons. Eelated to them are animal reservoirs such 



52 School of Hygiene and Public Health [60S 

as the rat in the case of the plague flea. The department aims 
to prepare students for public health work in medical zoology 
and to train advanced students for teaching positions and 
research work. 

1. Medical Zoology 1. Credit one major. Drs. Hegner, 
Cort, Taliaferro, Root, and Simon. Three mornings per 
week during one trimester. 

This course is designed to give a survey of the entire field 
of medical zoology. The more practical phases of proto- 
zoology, helminthology and medical entomology are empha- 
sized. The student is taught to recognize the species of 
parasites pathogenic to man and the diseases caused by them ; 
how to collect, prepare for study, examine, and cultivate the 
more important species; and the practical methods of pre- 
vention and control. 

The lectures are supplemented by the required reading of 
scientific articles in periodicals and reference books. 

The laboratory work includes the study of stages of the life 
histories of the parasites; methods of preparing material for 
study; methods of laboratory diagnosis, and the cultivation 
of parasites in lower animals and in artificial media. 

This course is required for candidates for the degree of 
Doctor of Public Health. Students who expect to work in 
the southern United States or in the tropics should elect, if 
possible, the special courses in Protozoology, Helminthology 
and Medical Entomology instead of the course in Medical 
Zoology outlined above. 

2. Protozoology. Medical Zoology 2. Credit one 
major. Drs. Hegner, Taliaferro, Simon, and Mr. Becker. 
Three mornings per week during one trimester. 

The aims of this course are (1) to gain a general knowl- 
edge of the biology of the protozoa; (2) to become ac- 
quainted with pathogenic species and the diseases caused by 
them; (3) to learn methods of preventing the spread of path- 
ogenic species by the control of the agents of transmission; 
(4) to acquire a knowledge of the problems presented by 



609] Departments of Instruction 53 

pathogenic species and the ability to solve them; thus laying 
the foundation necessary for carrying on original investiga- 
tions, and making it possible to take charge of public health 
work in protozoology in any community, and to direct cam- 
paigns in cases of epidemics. 

The lectures are devoted to the presentation and discussion 
by instructors and students of information obtained from 
original observations, from current literature, and from text 
and reference books. 

In the laboratory the four classes of protozoa are considered 
separately, involving the study (1) of typical free-living 
species, (2) of species parasitic in lower animals and (3) a 
more detailed examination of species parasitic in man. Meth- 
ods are given for collecting, cultivating and preparing for 
study both free-living and parasitic protozoa. 

3. Helminthology. Medical Zoology 3. Credit one 
major. Dr. Cort, Dr. Simon and Mr. Augustine. Three 
mornings per week during one trimester. 

This course aims (1) to give a general knowledge of the 
biology of the flatworms (Platyhelminthes), round worms 
(Nemathelminthes), and certain other worms; (2) to ac- 
quaint the student with pathogenic species and the diseases 
caused by them; (3) to supply practice in methods of diag- 
nosis; (4) to present methods of preventing the spread of 
pathogenic species by the control of the agents of trans- 
mission; (5) to furnish a knowledge of the problems pre- 
sented by pathogenic species that will enable the student to 
carry on original investigations or take charge of public 
health work in helminthology. 

Lectures are given each day which cover (1) the classifica- 
tion, structure and life history of the worms parasitic in man 
and (2) the distribution, symptomatology, pathology, diag- 
nosis and control of the diseases of man produced by para- 
sitic worms. The literature of human helminthology is as 
far as possible placed at the disposal of the student and 
emphasis is placed on the consultation of original papers 
rather than text books. 



54 School of Hygiene and Public J lea lift [010 

The laboratory work includes a study of the general biology 
of the groups of parasitic worms which have human repre- 
sentatives and of the structure and life history of the parasitic 
worms of man and their close relatives. A careful study is 
made of the eggs of the human helminths to prepare the 
student for the diagnosis of these diseases. Whenever possible, 
living material is studied, the free stages of the worms are 
cultured and experimental life-histories are carried through. 

4. Medical Entomology. Medical Zoology 4. Credit 
one major. Dr. Root and Mr. Hoffman. Three mornings 
per week during one trimester. 

This course is devoted chiefly to a study of the arthropods 
which transmit the bacteria, protozoa and worms that cause 
disease in man. The few arthropods which cause human dis- 
ease directly are also considered. In this connection insect 
venoms are taken up and comparisons made with snake 
venoms. 

The course aims : ( 1 ) to acquaint the student with the 
fundamentals of insect structure and classification; (2) to 
enable him to distinguish the species which carry disease from 
the harmless species; (3) to give him a working knowledge 
of the life-cycles of harmful species, actual and potential, 
especial emphasis being placed on the relation of the life-cycle 
to control measures. 

In order to include in the course all groups of insects which 
may become of sanitary importance, a few species which are 
known to carry only diseases of the lower animals are also 
studied. In connection with the study of control measures, 
the question of animal reservoirs of human disease is taken 
up, as, for instance, the relation of rats to bubonic plague. 

5. Filterable Viruses. Medical Zoology 5. Credit 
one-half major. Dr. Simon. Three mornings per week dur- 
ing one-half of one trimester. 

The aims of this course are (1) to acquaint the student 
with that important group of micro-organisms which is col- 
lectively known by the name of the " filterable viruses " and 



611] Departments of Instruction 55 

with certain other pathogenic agents of indeterminate taxo- 
nomic position; (2) to familiarize the student with those 
methods which have been successfully employed in the search 
for and in the study of these minute forms of living matter; 
(3) to enable the student to recognize those pathological 
changes in the tissues of the host which are diagnostic of the 
corresponding diseases; and (4) to call attention to those 
methods of control which are based upon a knowledge of the 
biological properties of the organisms under consideration. 

The course will comprise lectures, laboratory exercises, 
conferences, and prescribed readings. The lectures will deal 
with the general technique employed in the search for and 
in the study of the filterable viruses ; the biology of the filter- 
able viruses, mode of dissemination and infection, and tissue 
tropism ; the filterable viruses from the. standpoint of immun- 
ology; classification, geographical distribution, economic im- 
portance, pathological changes, and methods of control of 
diseases caused by 'filterable viruses, such as rabies, polio- 
myelitis, variola, vaccinia, alastrim, trachoma, mumps, 
measles, scarlatina ( ?), encephalitis ( ?), dengue, pappataci 
fever, rocky mountain spotted fever, and typhus fever. 

The laboratory exercises will include the study of the 
various methods for determining the presence of filterable 
organisms; methods of concentrating filterable viruses; 
methods of isolating the viruses of certain diseases and inocu- 
lating them into laboratory animals; the examination of 
macroscopic and microscopic preparations of pathological 
lesions; and the study of intermediate hosts. 

6. Special Three Weeks Couese in" Medical Zoology 
for Health Officers. Medical Zoology 6. Credit one- 
half major. Drs. Hegner, Cort, Taliaferro, Koot and Simon. 

This course is designed for Field Directors of the Inter- 
rational Health Board and for other Health Officers who 
may wish to obtain special knowledge of the animals that 
cause disease or disseminate disease-producing organisms and 
methods for their control. 



56 School of Hygiene and Public Health [612 

Lectures are given each day; these are prepared with 
special reference to the needs of those attending the course. 
They generally include (1) descriptions of the most im- 
portant organisms in each group studied, (2) geographical 
distribution of the diseases due to animal parasites, (3) effects 
of the parasites on man, (4) methods of diagnosis, (5) meth- 
ods of control, and (6) problems yet to be solved. 

Laboratory exercises include (1) methods of preparing 
material for diagnosis, (2) identification of the different 
types of organisms, (3) life cycles of the parasites, and 
(4) effects of parasitism on man. 

Conferences and Beading Periods. Eeferences to books 
and periodicals will be assigned and informal discussions of 
the subjects studied will be held including material gathered 
from the literature and from the personal experience of 
students and instructors. 

Although practically all of the protozoa and worms para- 
sitic in man and most of the insects that are involved in the 
transmission of disease germs to man are considered in this 
course, the principal topics emphasized are (1) hookworm 
disease, (2) fecal diagnosis, (3) malaria, and (4) mosquitoes. 

7. Investigations in Protozoology, Helminthology 
and Medical Entomology. Students who have had suffi- 
cient training may undertake original investigations in any 
of the above subjects. Small problems may be completed by 
properly qualified students in one trimester, but usually a 
year or more is required. Those who wish to elect any of 
these subjects as majors towards the degree of Doctor of 
Science in Hygiene or Doctor of Philosophy must plan their 
course so that a large part of their time may be devoted to 
research. 

8. Journal Club. The members of the department and 
others interested in Medical Zoology form a Journal Club 
which meets once each week during the school year. One 
paper is read at each meeting dealing either with original 
investigations or with recent literature. This is followed by 
a general discussion. The members of the department are 



613] Departments of Instruction 57 

thus given an opportunity to become acquainted with the 
details of each other's work and with advances in fields of 
Medical Zoology related to their own special subjects. 

9. Seminary. Once per month during the school year 
the members of the department and others who are interested 
meet for an evening of discussion on some phase of Medical 
Zoology. The program of each meeting consists of the read- 
ing of a paper, followed by a discussion. 

PHYSIOLOGICAL HYGIENE 

William H. Howell, Ph. D., M. D., Professor. 
Reynold A. Spaeth, Ph. D., Associate. 
Arthur L. Meyer, M. D., Associate. 
Janet H. Clark, Ph. D., Associate. 
Helene C. Wilson, Ph. D., Instructor. 

By physiological hygiene is understood the application of 
the facts and principles of animal physiology to problems of 
personal and public hygiene. The important subjects of diet 
and nutrition are considered in the department of chemical 
hygiene. In the department of physiological hygiene the 
subjects taken up, in addition to a general course in animal 
physiology, are personal hygiene, the physiological effects 
of exercise and fatigue, of variations in the composition and 
physical properties of the atmosphere, and of radiant energy 
of various kinds. The main purpose held in view is to fur- 
nish a scientific preparation for work in the fields of industrial 
and school hygiene. Course 6, or an equivalent, is required 
as a preliminary to courses 1, 2, 3 and 4. 

1. Physiological Hygiene 1. Credit one major. Drs. 
Spaeth, Meyer and Clark. This course is offered in the first 
and third trimesters. It takes up the study of the hygiene 
of living conditions especially as they are found in the in- 
dustries and schools. The topics discussed include the effects 
of muscular and mental work; the standardization of indus- 
trial conditions; the physiological effects of variations in 
temperature, moisture, air movements, etc.; the methods of 



58 School of Hygiene and Public Health [014 

artificial illumination and the general physiological action of 
light and other radiations. In the laboratory exercises those 
practical methods are given which have been found most 
useful in the investigation of living and working conditio)]-, 
such as the various fatigue and intelligence tests, the methods 
of determining quantitatively the physical and chemical com- 
position of the air, the methods of photometric and visual 
measurements, etc. 

In addition, visits of inspection are made to local schools 
and factories to study working conditions and systems of 
lighting and ventilation. 

This course is required as a preliminary to courses 2, 3 or 4. 

2. Physiological Hygiene 2. Credit one-half major. 
The Physiology of Work and Fatigue in the Industries. Dr. 
Spaeth. This is an elective course offered for two afternoons 
during the first trimester. 

3. Physiological Hygiene 3. Credit one-half major. 
Ventilation and Climatology. Dr. Meyer. This course is an 
elective given two afternoons in the second trimester. The 
time will be devoted chiefly to the investigation of problems 
bearing on the influence of heat, moisture, dust and poisonous 
gases or vapors upon the body processes. The laboratory 
exercises will be supplemented by conferences. 

4. Physiological Hygiene 4. Credit one-half major. 
The Physiological Action of Light, X-rays and other radia- 
tions. Dr. Clark. This is an elective course offered for two 
afternoons during the third trimester. The general literature 
of the subject will be covered in lectures or conferences. The 
laboratory problems assigned will be adapted to the par- 
ticular interests of the students, and if desirable a student 
may devote all his time to a single problem. 

5. Peksonal Hygiene. Dr. Howell. Lectures upon the 
hygiene of the individual. The different organs of the body 
are considered with reference to the conditions that influence 
their functional activity favorably or unfavorably. Once 
weekly during the third trimester. 



G15] Departments of Instruction 59 

6. Animal Physiology. Dr. Wilson. This course is 
intended primarily for candidates for the degree of Bachelor 
of Science in Hygiene. It comprises conferences, recitations, 
and laboratory exercises covering the subject of animal or 
human physiology as usually given to medical students. 
Three days weekly during the second trimester, 9 a. m. to 
4 p. m. 

7. Journal Club. Dr. Howell. A journal club con- 
sisting of the instructors and advanced students in the de- 
partment of physiological hygiene, meets once weekly through- 
out the year. The object of these meetings is to present and 
discuss recent experimental work in physiology. 

8. Research. Special or advanced students will be 
assigned problems for investigation under the supervision of 
members of the staff. 

BIOMETRY AND VITAL STATISTICS 

Raymond Pearl, Ph. D., Professor. 
Lowell J. Reed, Ph. D., Associate Professor. 
William T. Howard, M. D., Lecturer. 
John R. Miner, Sc. D., Associate. 
Sylvia M. Parker, A. B., Associate. 
Chester E. Rutherford, Assistant. 
Mary Gover, A. M., Assistant. 
Agnes L. Bacon, A. B., Volunteer Assistant. 

The work of this department is intended to meet the needs 
of two classes of students: (a) Those training for work in 
public health; (b) those intending to specialize in statistical 
work either as teachers, investigators, or administrators. 

1. Introduction to Vital Statistics. Statistics 1. 
Credit one major. Dr. Pearl, Dr. Keed, Dr. Miner, Miss 
Parker, and Miss Gover. Three mornings per week during 
the first trimester. The course is designed to acquaint the 
student, on the one hand, with modern methods of collecting, 
tabulating, adjusting, and drawing sound conclusions from 
statistical data regarding human life, and, on the other hand, 



60 School of Hygiene and Public Health [616 

with the chief results which have accrued from the study of 
vital statistics in the past. The course involves a consider- 
able amount of laboratory work, in which the student will 
gain first-hand familiarity with statistical data and methods 
in the fields of hygiene and public health. Special emphasis 
is placed upon modern biometric and graphic methods. 

Those wishing to gain more than an elementary knowledge 
of the subject should elect Course 1 A in the same trimester 
with Course 1. 

1 A. Laboratory Work in Vital Statistics. Sta- 
tistics 1 A. Credit one-half major. Dr. Reed, Dr. Miner, 
Miss Parker, and Miss Gover. This course must be taken in 
connection with Course 1. It provides more adequate labora- 
tory experience in vital statistics than can be got from Course 
1 alone. 

2. Advanced Statistical Theory. Statistics 2. Credit 
one major. Dr. Reed and Dr. Miner. Given in the second 
trimester. This course is intended to meet the needs of those 
students who desire to continue the study of statistical theory. 
In the first part of the course, the various methods of gradu- 
ating statistical data will be developed, special emphasis 
being placed on the methods of curve fitting. The second 
part of the course will be devoted to a consideration of the 
subject of correlation. The laboratory work of the course 
will include problems in life table construction, in the fitting 
of frequency curves and in simple and multiple correlation. 
The course is open only to those who have previously taken 
Course 1 in Statistics. 

2 A. Advanced Statistical Theory. Statistics 2 A. 
Credit one-half major. Dr. Reed and Dr. Miner. This 
course provides an opportunity for more extended laboratory 
work in advanced statistics. It must be taken in connection 
with Course 2. It is recommended that all students intend- 
ing to specialize in statistics elect this course. 

3. Colloquium on the Application of Statistical 
Methods to Problems of Medicine and Hygiene, Sta- 



617] Departments of Instruction 61 

tistics 3. Dr. Pearl. Given in the first trimester. Open 
only to those who have already had Courses 1 and 2 in 
Vital Statistics. The object of the course is, by means of 
conferences and reports, to train the student in the critical 
application of the statistical methods he will have acquired 
in the earlier courses to specific problems in the general field 
of biology, medicine and hygiene. (One afternoon per week) . 

4. The Statistical Measurement of the Effective- 
ness of Public Health Activities. Statistics 4. Credit 
one-half major. Dr. Howard. This course aims to give, by 
means of lectures and conferences, a historical and critical 
examination of the actual results of various public health 
activities. The most suitable statistical methods for the 
critical measurement of the effectiveness of such activities 
will be developed. 

5. Investigations in Biometry and Vital Statistics. 
Dr. Pearl. In the work of the department special attention 
will be devoted to research. Properly qualified workers, who 
may be either candidates for the degree of Doctor of Science 
in Hygiene or special students, may be taken into the labora- 
tory and either assigned problems in connection with the 
general co-ordinated plan of investigation being pursued in 
the department, or aided and directed in the development of 
their own problems. The general lines along which research 
may profitably be undertaken in the department are : higher 
statistical theory, analytical studies on human vital statistics, 
genetic and other biological factors influencing the duration 
of life, the study of modern statistical methods of epidemio- 
logical problems. (May be elected as a full or half course in 
any trimester.) 

6. Additional Opportunities. There are certain oppor- 
tunities for advanced students, resulting from outside con- 
nections of the department, apart from the courses offered 
which require special mention. 

Investigations on Tuberculosis. By means of funds fur- 
nished from several external sources there is in progress in 



62 School of Hygiene and Public Health [618 

the department an intensive investigation of the genetic and 
environmental factors concerned in the etiology and epi- 
demiology of tuberculosis. The investigation is being prose- 
cuted by the method of intensive field study and pedigree 
analysis, along the lines which have been so fruitful in the 
general field of eugenics. 

This investigation affords to properly qualified students 
an opportunity for practical experience and training in eu- 
genic field work, and the analysis of the data from such work. 

Hospital Statistics. Students interested in the statistical 
aspects of the problems of clinical medicine, surgery, and 
pathology will be afforded an opportunity of undertaking 
research upon these problems under the direction of Dr. Pearl. 
All of the extensive collection of case histories in the archives 
of the Hospital is available for such investigations. 

EPIDEMIOLOGY AND PUBLIC HEALTH ADMINIS- 
TRATION 

Wade H. Frost, M. D., Surgeon U. S. Public Health Service, 

Professor of Epidemiology. 
Allen W. Freeman, M. D., Resident Lecturer in Public Health 

Administration. 
James A. Doull, M. D., Dr. P. H., Associate in Epidemiology. 
Richard B. Norment, Jr., M. D., Associate in Public Health 

Administration. 
W. Thurber Fales, S. B., C. P. H., Instructor in Epidemiology. 

Epidemiology 

1. Epidemiology 1. Credit one major. Dr. Frost, Dr. 
Doull and Mr. Fales. 

This course is designed to give students a view of the mass- 
phenomena of infectious diseases and the relation of their 
characteristic epidemiological features to the determining 
factors of habit and environment; also to afford training in 
the methods of studying diseases from this angle. Special 
attention is devoted to the utilization of such systematic 



619] Departments of Instruction 63 

observations as may be made in connection with the work of 
administrative public health organizations, and as are re- 
quired for the direction and evaluation of control measures. 

The requirements for admission to the course are a knowl- 
edge of the basic facts and principles of bacteriology, together 
with an elementary knowledge of statistical method. Subject 
to certain exceptions, students will be admitted to this course 
only after completing the courses in bacteriology and vital 
statistics which are required in the curriculum. 

The course consists of lectures discussing the principles 
and methods of epidemiological investigation and illustrating 
their application in selected problems ; laboratory work, occu- 
pying approximately nine hours a week, in the analysis of 
crude epidemiological data exemplifying typical problems, 
and in the presentation of results; conferences for the dis- 
cussion of topics in connection with lectures and laboratory 
work, and a course of selected collateral reading. 

Three days a week, 9 a. m. to 1 p. m. throughout the sec- 
ond trimester. 

2. Epidemiology 2. Credit one-half major. Dr. Frost, 
Dr. Freeman and Dr. Doull. 

The purpose of this course is to give students a more com- 
prehensive knowledge of the recognition, prevalence, modes 
of transmission and control of infectious diseases. The lec- 
tures consider a number of diseases from the standpoint of 
their history, characteristic epidemiological features, present 
relative importance as public health problems and status as 
to control. In addition to lectures, the course will include 
clinics to the extent that material is available, and assigned 
reading. 

This course is supplementary to the courses in Epidemi- 
ology 1, and in Public Health Administration 2, and may be 
taken to best advantage in connection with them. It is, how- 
ever, open to students who are not registered in Epidemi- 
ology 1. 

Three days a week, afternoon hours, in the second trimester. 



64 School of Hygiene and Public Health \ 020 

3. Special Studies. Properly qualified student- desiring 
to undertake advanced work in epidemiology, either as candi- 
dates for the Doctor of Science degree, as special students, or 
as a part of the work for the Doctor of Public Health, will 
be assigned problems under the direction of the staff of the 
Department. Through the courtesy of the City Department 
of Health excellent facilities are afforded for field work in 
this connection. 

Public Health Administration 

1. Public Health Organization. Dr. Freeman. Two 
lectures a week during the first trimester. 

This course is designed to give the student a general view 
of the historical development of health activity as a function 
of government and of the forms of health organization exist- 
ing in the United States and in certain foreign countries. 
It will include a study of the history and present status of 
the health activity of the federal government, of the growth 
and development of the health departments of the states, 
and of the present forms of organization designed to serve 
cities and rural areas. Collateral reading will be assigned 
and the reports of typical organizations studied outside the 
class. 

2. Public Health Problems. Dr. Freeman. Four 
hours a week during the second trimester. 

Conferences on the practical application of sanitary science 
to the problems of the public health. At these conferences 
the methods of operation of the various types of health organi- 
zation will be taken up and studied in detail. The large 
collection of administrative forms and reports possessed by 
f-.he department will be utilized for discussion and criticism 
and practical exercises will be given in the preparation of 
such material. The following topics will be discussed in the 
course : 

1. Public health education and publicity. 

2. Maternal and infant welfare work. 



621] Departments of Instruction 65 

3. Medical supervision of the school child. 

4. The conduct of public health nursing. 

5. Milk and food inspection. 

6. Sanitary and housing inspection. 

7. The special problems of rural sanitation. 

8. The prevention of the communicable diseases of the 
respiratory tract. 

9. The prevention of the communicable diseases of the 
intestinal tract. 

10. The prevention of the acute exanthematous diseases. 

11. The prevention of the venereal diseases. 

12. The prevention of malaria and yellow fever. 

13. The prevention of tuberculosis. 

14. The prevention of cancer. 

15. The prevention of blindness. 

16. The form and content of health reports. 

3. Field Demonstrations. Dr. Freeman. Two after- 
noons a week during the third trimester. 

The object of the field demonstrations is to give the student 
an opportunity to study the operation of actual units of 
health operation, official and voluntary. Visits will be made 
to as many of the various forms of activity being carried on 
in Baltimore and Maryland as time will permit. These will 
include state and city health departments, tuberculosis sani- 
toria, hospitals and clinics, maternal and child welfare clinics, 
schools, communicable disease hospitals, dairies and milk 
depots, venereal clinics, industrial establishments and the 
offices of volunteer health agencies, national, state and local. 

For the purpose of giving each student a view of the prac- 
tical operation of a health unit serving a small city and a 
rural district, students in groups will visit the demonstration 
unit being conducted at Hagerstown, Maryland, by the Mary- 
land State Health Department in co-operation with the 
United States Public Health Service, the International 
Health Board, and the School of Hygiene and Public Health. 



CO 



School of Hygiene and Public Health [622 



During the session 1921-1922 each student was required to 
spend one week at Hagerstown for this purpose. 

Courses 1, 2 and 3 must he taken in sequence and together 
constitute one major course. 

4. Child Hygiene (Elective). Two lectures a week 
during one trimester. 

The course is designed to give the student acquaintance 
with the historical development of child hygiene work in the 
United States and in foreign countries and with the present 
purposes and methods of child hygiene activity. Use will he 
made of the material aiforded by organizations conducting 
the various phases of child hygiene work in Baltimore and 
vicinity. Students taking the course will be required 1x 
attend field demonstrations of child hygiene activities. 

5. Special Studies. Arrangements may be made for 
limited number of students possessing the necessary qualifi- 
cations and interested in special phases of public health ad- 
ministration, to do special work in these subjects under the 
supervision of the department. 



SCHEDULES OF COURSES FOR THE 

SESSION OF 1922 1923 



SCHEDULES OF COURSES 



SCHEDULE FOR THE COURSE LEADING TO THE DEGREE 
OF DOCTOR OF PUBLIC HEALTH 

The schedule arranged for candidates for the degree of 
Doctor of Public Health consists of required and elective 
courses. To complete the requirements for graduation, credits 
must be obtained for at least sixteen major courses, a major 
course being defined as one that requires twelve hours, or 
approximately twelve hours, a week during one trimester. 
A number of elective courses are offered which have the value 
of a whole or of a part of a major course. The following ten 
courses are required: 

One major course in Bacteriology, one in Immunology, one 
in Epidemiology, one in Statistics, one in Sanitary Engi- 
neering, one in Parasitology, one in Physiological Hygiene, 
one in Chemical Hygiene. The work in Public Health 
Administration which extends through three trimesters is 
required and counts as one major course, and certain of the 
afternoon lectures are also required and are given the value 
of a major course. 

The six additional courses needed may be elected from 
other major or part major courses offered in the schedule in 
the mornings or afternoons. Part of a trimester may be 
reserved for the preparation of a thesis under the direction 
of a member of the staff, and this work will be given the 
credit of a major course. When a trimester or part of a 
trimester can be spent with the County Health Unit, proper 
credit will be given for the time in accordance with the 
report of the Director of the Unit. Credit will also be given 

GO 



70 School of Hygiene ami Public Health [020 

for individual work done under the direction of a member 
of the staff when this work is properly authorized and a 
satisfactory report is received. 

In addition to the sixteen courses done in the School, can- 
didates must submit satisfactory credentials for field work 
done in the summer or at other times in an organized health 
service or for work done in a hospital for infectious diseases. 

Under ordinary conditions two academic years will be 
needed to complete the requirements for the degree. Can- 
didates may register at the beginning of any trimester and 
due credit will be given for work done elsewhere when satis- 
factory credentials are presented. 

The general idea that is held in mind in the arrangement 
of the schedule is to require all candidates for the degree to 
complete a certain number of short courses covering the 
fundamental subjects in public health training and then by 
offering as wide a selection of electives as possible to enabh 
each candidate to prepare himself as fully as the time and 
opportunities permit in those special lines in which he may 
be most interested. In choosing his electives he may select 
from the scheduled courses or he may do individual advanced 
work in any one department. 

Students taking the combined course in medicine and 
public health will be required to absolve work equivalent to 
fourteen major courses in addition to the requirement of a 
summer in field work or in a hospital for infectious diseases. 
For students in the Johns Hopkins Medical School it is sug- 
gested that credits may be obtained for a major course in 
Bacteriology and in Immunology or Parasitology in th( 
medical course. During their fourth year their elective tri- 
mester may be given to work in the School of Hygiene which 
will enable them to complete three additional major courses. 
After graduation in Medicine a year in the School of Hygiene 
will permit completion of the full requirement of fourteen 
major courses. Arrangements must be made, however, to 



627] Schedule of Courses 71 

complete the requirement of field work during the inter- 
vening summer. 

Students from other medical schools must make arrange- 
ments during their medical course to obtain credits covering 
at least, five major courses. It is suggested that these credits 
may be obtained in Bacteriology, one or two courses ; Immun- 
ology; Parasitology; Chemical Hygiene and Sanitary Engi- 
neering. Arrangements should be made also for a summer 
in field work before registration in the School of Hygiene 
and Public Health. 



72 School of Hygiene and Public Health 

First or Fourth Tbimesteb (October •'{ TO December 
Morning Courses, 9 a. m. to 1 p. if. 

*Sanitary Engineering Monday, Wednesday, Friday. 

Chemical Hygiene 1 

Physiological Hygiene 1 " " " 

Statistics 1 Tuesday, Thursday. Saturday. 

Protozoology (Medical Zoology 2). " " " 

Bacteriology 3 (Any three mornings). 

Second or Fifth Trimester (January 2 to March 14) 
Morning Courses, 9 a. m. to 1 p. m. 

Bacteriology 1 Monday, Wednesday, Friday. 

Immunology 1 c: 

Statistics 2 

Epidemiology 1 Tuesday, Thursday, Saturday 

Helminthology ( Medical Zoology 3 ) . " " 

Filterable viruses (Medical Zool- 
ogy 5) and 

Spirochaetes (Bacteriology 4).... ef " " 

Chemical Hygiene 2 •' " " 

Bacteriology 3 (Any three mornings). 

Third or Sixth Trimester (March 15 to June 2) 
Morning Courses, 9 a. m. to 1 p. m. 

Bacteriology 2 Monday, Wednesday, Friday. 

Medical Zoology 1 

Immunology 2 " " " 

Physiological Hygiene 1 Tuesday, Thursday. Saturdaj 

Chemical Hygiene 1 c< " " 

Entomology (Medical Zoology 4) . . . Cl " " 
Bacteriology 3 (Any three mornings). 

* Sanitary Engineering, Monday, 11.30 to 4; Wednesday. 8.30 
12,30; Friday. 8.30 to 12.30. 



629] Schedule of Courses 73 



Afternoon Courses 

(First of Fourth Trimester (October 3 to December 23) 
Required 

Public Health Organization.,. .Wednesday and Friday, 2 to 3 
Selected Topics in Hygiene .... Wednesday, 4 p. m. 

Nutrition and Diet Monday, Wednesday, Friday, 2 to 3 

De Lamar Public Lectures .... Monday, 5 p. m. 

Electives 

Bacteriology 6 Tuesday and Thursday, 2 to 5 

Statistics 1 A Tuesday and Thursday, 2 to 5 

Statistics, Conference Friday, 3.30 p. m. 

Chemical Hygiene 4 Tuesday and Thursday, 2 to 5 

Physiological Hygiene 2 Tuesday and Thursday, 2 to 5 

[mmunology 3 Any afternoon. 

Second or Fifth Trimester (January 2 to March 14) 

Required 

Public Health Problems Monday and Wednesday, 2 to 4 

Selected Topics in Hygiene .... Wednesday, 4.30 p. m. 
De Lamar Public Lectures .... Monday, 5 p. m. 

Electives 

Statistics 2 A Monday, Wednesday, Friday, 2 to 4 

Epidemiology 2 Tuesday, Thursday, 2-3; Friday, 2-5. 

Physiological Hygiene 3 Tuesday and Thursday, 2 to 5 

Immunology 3 Any afternoon. 

Third or Sixth Trimester (March 15 to June 2) 

Required 

Public Health Administration 

— Field Demonstrations Monday and Friday, 2 to 5 

Personal Hygiene Wednesday, 2 to 4 

Sanitary Law Wednesday, 4.30 p. m. 

De Lamar Public Lectures. . . .Monday, 5 p. m. 

Electives 

Bacteriology 5 Tuesday and Thursday, 2 to 5 

Physiological Hygiene 4 Tuesday and Thursday, 2 to 5 

Mental Hygiene Thursday, 4.30; Saturday, 2 

I Statistics 4 Tuesday and Thursday, 2 to 4 

Public Health Admin. 4 Tuesday and Thursday, 2 to 3 

Immunology 3 Any afternoon. 



74 



School of Hygiene and Public Health [630 



Students may select their courses for two years from the schedule above in any 
combination that they desire, except that in some cases certain sequences must be 
followed. For example, the course in Epidemiology 1 must be preceded by a course in 
Statistics 1, and advanced courses in any subject presuppose a preliminary course in the 
same subject. The following arrangement of courses is suggested as desirable in most 
cases. Individual work done under direction of a member of the staff may be offered 
as an elective course. 



FIRST YEAR 



FIRST TRIMESTER 



Mornings 

Sanitary Engineering 
Statistics 1 



Afternoons 

T , f Public Health Administration 

lectures | Selected To pi cs in Hygiene 

vi **tm 3 One elective from the group 
Elective-, offered in this trimester 



SECOND TRIMESTER 



Bacteriology 1 or 
Immunology 1 
Epidemiology 1 



T . I Public Health Administration 

lectures | Selected Top i cs in Hygiene 

vi fit 5 One elective from the group 
mecme\ offertd in this trimester 



THIRD TRIMESTER 



Bacteriology 2 or 

Immunology 2 
Physiological Hygiene 1 or 

Chemical Hygiene 1 



SECOND YEAR 



Field Demonstrations 

ci „*•„,.. /One elective from the group 
Elective j offered in this trimester 



FIRST TRIMESTER 



II 

For students not interested 
in Parasitic Diseases 

Mornings 



For students interested 
in Parasitic Diseases 

Mornings 

Chemical Hygiene 1 or Chemical Hygiene 1 or 

Physiological Hygiene 1 Physiological Hygiene 1 



Lectures 



Protozoology 



Bacteriology 3 



Afternoons 

J Selected Topics in Hygiene 
) Nutrition and Diet 



fOne or more electives fror 
the group offered in thi 
trimester 



SECOND TRIMESTER 



Immunology 1 or 

Statistics 2 
Helminthology 



Thesis preparation 
Entomology 



Immunology 1 or 

Statistics 2 
Filterable viruses 
and Spirochaetes 



Lectures Selected Topics in Hygien 
fOne or more electives fror 

Electives \ the group offered in thi 
[ trimester 



THIRD TRIMESTER 



Parasitology 
Thesis preparation 



Lectures 

[One or more electives froi 
Electives -j the group offered in thi 

[ trimester 



631] Schedule of Courses 75 

SCHEDULE FOR THE COURSE LEADING TO THE 
CERTIFICATE IN PUBLIC HEALTH 

First Trimester (October 3 to December 23, 1922) 
Morning Courses — 9 to 1 

*Sanitary Engineering Monday, Wednesday, Friday. 

Statistics 1 Tuesday, Thursday, Saturday. 

Afternoon Courses 

Public Health Organization Wednesday, Friday, 2 to 3 

Selected Topics in Hygiene Wednesday, 4 p. m. 

De Lamar Lectures Monday, 5 p. m. 

Statistics 1 A, or other Elective .. Tuesday, Thursday, 2 to 5 

Second Trimester (January 2 to March 14, 1923) 
Morning Courses — 9 to 1 
Bacteriology 1 or 

Immunology 1 Monday, Wednesday, Friday. 

Epidemiology Tuesday, Thursday, Saturday. 

Afternoon Courses 

Public Health Problems Monday, Wednesday, 2 to 4 

Selected Topics in Hygiene Wednesday, 4.30 p. m. 

De Lamar Lectures Monday, 5 p. m. 

Epidemiology 2 or other Elective . Tuesday, Thursday, 2 p. m.; 

Friday, 2 to 5 

Third Trimester (March 15 to June 2, 1923) 
Morning Courses — 9 to 1 

Bacteriology 2, or Immunology 2 

or Medical Zoology 1 Monday, Wednesday, Friday. 

Physiological Hygiene 1, or 

Chemical Hygiene 1, or 

Entomology Tuesday, Thursday, Saturday. 

Afternoon Courses 

Field Demonstrations Monday and Friday, 2 to 5 

Personal Hygiene Wednesday, 2 to 4 

Sanitary Law Wednesday, 4.30 p. m. 

De Lamar Lectures Monday, 5 p. m. 

Mental Hygiene or other elective 

* Sanitary Engineering, Monday, 11.30 to 4; Wednesday, 8.30 to 12.30; Friday, 
8.30 to 12.30. 



76 School of Hygiene and Public Health 632 

SCHEDULE FOR THE COURSE LEADING TO THE 
DEGREE OF BACHELOR OF SCIENCE 

First Trimester (October 3 to December 23, 1922) 

Laboratory Courses: 

Anatomy Monday, Wednesday, Friday, 9 to 4. 

Histology Tuesday, Thursday, 9 to 4. 

Afternoon Lectures: 

De Lamar Lectures Monday, 5 p. m. 

Second Trimester (January 2 to March 14, 1923) 

Laboratory Courses : 

Bacteriology 1 Monday, Wednesday, Friday, 9 to 1. 

Physiology Tuesday, Thursday, Saturday, 9 to 4. 

Afternoon Courses: 

De Lamar Lectures Monday, 5 p. m. 

Third Trimester (March 15 to June 2, 1923) 

Laboratory Courses: 

Bacteriology 2 Monday, Wednesday, Friday, 9 to 1. 

Physiological Hygiene 1.. .. Tuesday, Thursday, Saturday, 9 to 1. 

Afternoon Lectures: 

De Lamar Lectures Monday, 5 p. m. 

Personal Hygiene Wednesday, 2 to 4 p. m. 

Fourth Trimester 
Laboratory Courses: 

Chemical Hygiene 1 Monday, Wednesday, Friday, 9 to 1. 

Statistics 1, or 
Bacteriology 3 Tuesday, Thursday, Saturday, 9 to 1. 

Afternoon Courses: 

De Lamar Lectures Monday, 5 p. m. 

Selected Topics in Hygiene. . Wednesday, 4 p. m. 

Nutrition and Diet Monday, Wednesday, Friday, 2 to 3. 



633] Schedule of Courses 77 



Fifth Trimester 

Laboratory Courses: 

Immunology 1 Monday, Wednesday, Friday, 9 to 1. 

Chemical Hygiene 2 or 
Spirochaetes and 
Filterable viruses Tuesday, Thursday, Saturday, 9 to 1. 

Afternoon Courses: 

De Lamar Lectures Monday, 5 p. m. 

Selected Topics in Hygiene. . Wednesday, 4.30 p. m. 

Sixth Trimester 

Laboratory Courses: 

Medical Zoology 1 Monday, Wednesday, Friday, 9 to 1. 

Pathology Tuesday, Thursday, 9 to 4. 

Afternoon Courses: 

De Lamar Lectures Monday, 5 p. m. 

Sanitary Law Wednesday, 4.30 p. m. 



INTENSIVE COURSE FOR PUBLIC HEALTH OFFICERS 

The daily schedule arranged for this course during the session of 1021-192 
November 14 to December 21, was as follows: 



November 9-1 


2-4 


4-5 Lecture 


W 


Mon. 


14, 


Registration 


Registration 


Introductory 
Dr. Welch 


DeLam 
Lectu 


Tue. 


15, 


Bacteriology 


C Organization for 
{Field Work 


Dr. Freeman 


Ccl. 
McCarris 


Wed. 


16, 


Vital Statistics 


Field Work 


Dr. Welch 




•Thu. 


17, 


Bacteriology 


Field Work 


Dr. Howell 




Fri. 


18, 


Vital Statistics 


Field Work 


Dr. Howell 




Sat. 


19, 


Bacteriology 








Mon. 


21, 


Vital Statistics 


Epidemiology 2-5 






Tue. 


22, 


Bacteriology 


Field Work 


Dr. Freeman 




Wed. 


23, 


Vital Statistics 


Field Work 


Dr. Welch 




Thu. 


24, 


Thanksgiving Day — No Classes 






Fri. 


25, 


Vital Statistics 


Field Work 


Dr. Bull 




Sat. 


26, 


Bacteriology 








Mon. 


28, 


Immunology 


Epidemiology 2-5 




DeLam 
Lectur 


Tue. 


29, 


Bacteriology 


Field Work 


Dr. J. S. Fulton 


Dr. Bali 


Wed. 


30, 


Immunology 


Field Work 


Dr. Welch 




December 










Thu. 


1, 


Bacteriology 


Epidemiology 2-5 


Dr. McCollum 




Fri. 


2, 


Food and Nutrition 


Field Work 


Dr. McCollum 




Sat. 


3, 


Bacteriology 














C Conference, City 
( Administration, 






Mon. 


5, 


Food and Nutrition 












Dr. Jones 






Tue. 


6, 


Bacteriology 


Epidemiology 


Dr. Freeman 




Wed. 


7, 


Food and Nutrition 


Field Work 


Dr. Welch 




Thu. 


8, 


Bacteriology 


Epidemiology 






Fri. 


9, 


Medical Zoology 


Field Work 


Dr. McCollum 




Sat. 


10, 


Sanitary Engineer'g 








Mon. 


12, 


Medical Zoology 


Epidemiology 2-5 




DeLan 
Lectin 


Tue. 


13, 


Sanitary Engineer'g 


Sanitary Engineer'g 


Dr. Freeman 


Dr. Leathi 


Wed. 


14, 


Medical Zoology 


C Rural Administr'n,, Wlh 
( Dr. Freeman 




Thu. 


15, 


Sanitary Engineer'g 


Sanitary Engineer'g 


Dr. McCollum 




Fri. 


16, 


Medical Zoology 


(School Hygiene, 
{ Dr. Buckler 


Dr. McCollum 




Sat. 


17, 


Physiology 






Mon. 


19, 


Medical Zoology 


Epidemiology 2-5 




DeLan 
Lectu 
Dr. Le^ 


Tue. 


20, 


Physiology 


C City Administr'n, 
{ Dr. Freeman 


Dr. Freeman 


Wed. 


21, 


Medical Zoology 


C Child Hygiene, 
(Dr. Williams 


Dr. Welch 





78 



DEGREES CONFERRED, 1919-1922 



DEGREES CONFERRED, 1919-1922 



Doctors of Public Health 



1919 

Ferrell, John Atkinson — S. B. and M. 
D. North Carolina 1902 and 1907 — 
Director for the United States of the 
International Health Board, New 
York. (61 Broadway). 



1920 

Souza, Geraldo Horacio de Paula — 
Pharm. D. Sao Paulo School of Phar- 
macy 1908; M. D. Rio Janeiro 1913 — 
Assoc. Prof. Hygiene. Faculdade de 
Medicina, Sao Paulo, Brazil. 

Vieira, Francisco Borges — B. Sc. e 
Lett. Sao Paulo Gym. 1911; M. D. 
Rio Janeiro 1917 — Assistant in Hy- 
giene, Faculdade de Medicina, Sao 
Paulo, Brazil. 



1921 

Atwater, Reginald Myers — A. B. Colo- 
rado Coll. 1914; M. D. Harvard 1918; 
C. P. H. Johns Hopkins University, 
1920— Hunan-Yale Med. Sch. Chang- 
sha, China. 

Bailey, Garland Howard — S. B. West 
Va. 1915; M. D. Johns Hopkins Uni- 
versity, 1920 — Instr. Pathol, and Bac- 
teriol. Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison. 

Brown, Orville Graham — M. D. Colum- 
bia 1900; Lieut. -Col. Med. Corps, U. 
S. A.; Chief of Section Hygiene and 
Sanitation, Infantry Officers Sch. Camp 
Benning, Ga. 

Doull, James Angus — A. B. Dalhousie 
1911, M. D. C. M. 1914; D. P. H. 
Cambridge 1919 — Assoc. Epidemiol. J. 
H. U. 

Dunham, George Clark — M. D. Oregon 
1914— Major, Med. Corps, U. S. A., 
Surgeon General's Office, Washington. 

Ellicott, Valcoulon LeMoyne — S. B. 
Mass. Inst. Tech. 1916; M. D. Johns 
Hopkins University 1920 — Interne, 
Willard Parker Hospital, New York. 



Lim, Chong Eang — M. B. and S. M. 
Hong Kong Univ. 1916; D. T. M. 
Liverpool Sch. of Trop. Med. 1921 — 
Volunteer Asst. Immunol. J. H. U. 

Maxcy, Kenneth Fuller — A. B. George 
Washington 1911; M. D. Johns Hop- 
kins University 1915 — Asst. Surg. U. 
S. P. H. S. Memphis, Tenn. 

Nauss, Ralph Welty — S. B. Ohio State 
1901; M. D. Northwestern 1905; D. 
P. H. Univ. of Pa. 1916; Asst. Epi- 
demiologist, State Dept. of Health, 
Springfield, 111. 

Oldt, Frank — A. B. Otterbein 1901; 
M. D. Ohio Med. 1905 — Med. Mission- 
ary, United Brethren Mission, Sin Lam 
near Canton, China. 

Padua y Gaerlan, Regina — M. D. Univ. 
of Philippines 1915, D. T. M. 1918 — 
Philippine Health Service, Manila. 

Szymanski, John Joseph — A. B. St. 
John's (Brooklyn) 1910; M. D. Johns 
Hopkins University 1914 — Physician 
and Public Health Work, Passaic, N. J. 

Whitmore, Eugene Rudolph — S. B. Wis- 
consin 1896; M. D. Illinois 1899; 
Lieut. Col. U. S. A. Retired— Prof. 
Bacteriol. Clin. Micros, and Preventive 
Med. George Washington Univ. 

Williams, George Huntington — A. B. 
Harvard 1915; M. D. Johns Hopkins 
University 1919 — Sanitary Supervisor, 
State Dept. of Health, Albany, N. Y. 



1922 (February 22) 

Abriol, Rufino — M. D. Illinois 1913; 
D. T. M. Univ. of Philippines 1916; 
C. P. H. Johns Hopkins University 
1921; U. S. P. H. S. (Quarantine), 
Manila. 

Meehan, John William — A. B. and A. 
M. St. Mary's (Kans.) 1904 and 1906; 
M. D. Creighton 1908— Major, Med. 
Corps, U. S. A.; Sanitary Inspector, 
Seventh Training Area, Fort Snelling, 
Minn. 



81 



82 



School of Hygiene and Public Health [638 



Doctors of Science j.\ Bygdene 



1920 

Salter, Raymond Cleveland — S. B. Wis- 
consin 1915; 8. M. Iowa State 1918 — 
— Bacteriologist, Md. State Dept. of 
Health; Inst. Bacteriol. J. H. U.— 
{Bacteriology) 



1921 

Smith, Homer William — A. B. Denver 
1917— Research Chemist, Eli Lilly Co. 
Indianapolis — (Physiology ) 



1922 (February 22) 

Miner, John Rice — A. B. Mich. 1918 — 
Assoc. Biometry and Vital Statistics 
J. II. V.— (Statistics) 



Certificates in Public Health 



1920 

Anderson, Charles Magee — M. D. C. M. 
McGill 1916 — Bacteriologist, Provin- 
cial Board of Health, Toronto, Can. 

Atwater, Reginald Myers — A. B. Colo- 
rado Coll. 1914; M. D. Harvard 1918 
— <Hunan-Yale Med. Sch., Changsha, 
China. 

Bernard, Zdenek — M. D. Prague 1914 — 
Health Officer, Ostrava; Czechoslo- 
vakia. 

Cornelius, James Thambidurai — A. M. 

and M. D. Cincinnati 1919 — Assistant 
Professor of Hygiene, Provincial Hy- 
giene Institute, Lucknow, India. 

Driml, Karel — M. D. Prague 1914 — 

(Secretary, Ministry of Public Health 
and Physical Education, Prague, 
Czechoslovakia. 



1921 

Abriol, Rufino — M. D. Illinois 1913; 
J). T. M. Univ. of Philippines 1916— 
U. S. P. H. S. (Quarantine), Manila. 

Grant, John Black — A. B. Acadia 1912; 
M. D. Mich. 1917 — Member Staff, In- 
ternal Health Bd., Assoc. Prof. Pub- 
lic Health and Hvgiene, Peking Union 
Med. Coll. China. 

Leach, Charles Nelson — A. B. Stanford 
1909, M. D. 1913— Senior Field Direc- 
tor, Internat. Health Bd. Manila. 

Newman, Gladys — A. B. Oberlin 1917 — 
Teaching in High School, Buffalo, N. 
Y. (1568 Delaware Av.) 

Pedley, Frank Gordon — A. B. McGill 
1913, M. D. C. M. 1916 — Epidemiolo- 
gist, State Bd. of Health, Topeka, 
Ivan- - . 

RivfasVides, Ricardo — S. B. El Salva- 
dor Inst. 1906; M. D. El Salvador 
Univ. 1916. 



Bachelors of Science ix Hygiene 



1920 

Barrett, Edith Margaret Jane — Bacteri- 
ologist, Tennessee Dairies, Dallas, Tex. 

1921 

Cox, Charles Raymond — Sanitary Eng., 
Internat. Health Bd., Memphis, Tenn. 



Goodwin, Winifred Anderson — A. B. 
Mich. 1914 — Laboratory Technician. 
Highland Park Hospital, Mich. 

Koch, Marie Louise — Junior Physiolo- 
gist, Chem. Warfare Service, U. S. A. 
Edgewood, Md. 

Shelling, David Henry — Med. Student, 
Yale University. 



INDEX 



INDEX OF NAMES 



PAGE 

Abadia, G 21 

Abriol, R 17, 18, 82 

Anderson, C. M 81 

Atwater, R. M 81, 82 

Augustine, D. L 14, 18, 51, 52 

Bacon, A. L 13 

Baetjer, A. M 18 

Bailey, C. E 18 

Bailey, G. H 81 

Baker, N. D 6 

Baker, S. J 37, 78 

Barcroft, J 38 

Barreto, A. L. B 15, 17 

Barrett, E. M. J 82 

Barrier, A. F 24 

Baudouin, J. A 15, 21 

Becker, E. R 14, 18, 51, 53 

Becker, J. E 14, 21, 49 

Bedell, A. S 23 

Ben Harel, S 18 

Bernard. Z 82 

Best, A. E 21 

Bliss, E. A 18 

Boyce, W. G 6 

Boyd, M. F 23 

Brown, 0. G 81 

Bull, C. G 9, 26, 47, 48 

Bullen, I. E 24 

Castro, A 15, 20 

Celerek, J 15, 21 

Chapman, M. J 18 

Clark, J. H 11, 57, 58 

Clarke, J. L 22 

Cleveland, L. R 15, is 

Collinson, J 17 

Cornelius, J. T 82 

Cort, E. C 21 

Cort, W. W 9, 51, 52, 53, 55 

Cox, C. R 23, 82 

Coughlin, F. E 17 

Craig, E. M., Jr 23 

Cromwell, H. W 15, 18 

Damon, S. R 13, 45 

Darling, S. T 14 

Dean, A. S 17 

Dershimer, F. W [ 20 

Docherty, J. F 23 

Doenng, C. R 7.7 17 

Doull, J. A 12, 62, 63, 81 

Dow ell, A. S 24 

Drbohlav, J. J 15, 21 

Driml, K ' g2 

Dumont, W. H 23 

Dunham, G. C \ 81 

Durham, M. L 77 26 

East, E. M 38 

Eichel, 0. R ....'. 38 

Ellicott, V. L 81 

Elvers, C. F 21 

Enciso-Ruiz, E 15 17 

Erb, N. McL 7.7.7...' 21 

641] 



PAGE 

Fales, W. T 13, 18, 62 

Feirabend, B . . 21 

Fernando, J. S 22 

Ferrell, J. A 81 

Ford, W. W. 8, 26, 45, 47 

Fountain, T 24 

Fraga, A 16, 21 

France, M. v. T 20 

Freeman, A. W., 

8, 26, 40, 62, 63, 64, 78 

Frobisher, M., Jr 21 

Frost, W. H 8, 26, 62, 63 

Fulton, J. S 9, 78 

Gaitan, L 16, 22 

Garzon-Cossa, G 21 

Gichner, M. G 21 

Glenn, J., Jr. 6 

Gonzales, B. M 18 

Goodison, W. L. T 20 

Goodnow, F. J 7, 26 

Goodwin, W. A 82 

Gover, M 14, 19, 59, 60 

Grant, J. B 82 

Gregory, J. H 8, 26, 49 

Griswold, B. H., Jr 6 

Guerrero, J 16, 20 

Hakin, R. M 22 

Harlan, H. D 6 

Havens, L. C 11, 47, 48 

Heaps, P 24 

Hegner, R. W 9, 26, 51, 52, 55 

Hill, J. H 23 

Hille, M. J 24 

Hoffman, W. A 14, 19, 51, 54 

Hoffstadt, R. E 19 

Holmes, F. 19 

Hons, V 16, 22 

Houghtaling, F. M 23 

Howard, C. H 24 

Howard, W. T 9,59, 61 

Howell, W. H., 

7, 26, 30, 57, 58, 59, 78 

Hunter, A. S 24 

Huntington, E 38 

Hyde, R. R 11, 47 

Ilsley, M. L 17 

Johnson, H. A 23 

Jones, C. H 10 

Jordan, E. O 38 

Joseph, R. C 24 

Keyser, R. B 6 

Kinney, E. M 13, 19, 49 

Kirk, A. A 23 

Kleeberger, F. L 15, 19 

Knights, E. M 23 

Knipmeyer, W. W 20 

Knott, A. D 17 

Koch, M. L 82 

Kratsch, H. A. L 24 

Lambrichts, G 20 

Lange, L. B 12, 45 

85 



80 



School of Hygiene and Public Health | 042 



PAGE 

Langwill, B 19 

Larde, C. R 16, 17 

Leach, C. N 82 

Leathers, W. S 37, 78 

Le Blanc, T. J 16, 20 

Lee, R. 1 38 

Lenert, L. G 23 

Levering, E 6 

Levine, V. E 19 

Lewis, P. A 38, 78 

Lim, C. E 14, 47, 81 

Lisk, H 15, 19 

Livingston, M 24 

Lotka, A. J 14 

Lotsy, J. P 38 

McCarrison, R 37, 78 

McCollum, E. V.. 7, 26, 49, 50, 51, 78 

McCoy, G. W 38 

McDowell, C 19 

McLean, C. E 22 

MacDonald, M. B 12, 49, 50, 51 

Macgowan, B 22 

Magoon, E. H 23 

Marburg, T 6 

Martin, W. C 17 

Masek, J 16, 20 

Maxcy, K. F 81 

Meader, P. D 12, 45, 46 

Meehan, J. W 17, 81 

Meyer, A. L 11, 57, 58 

Mildazis, J. J 23 

Miner, J. R 10, 19, 59, 60, 82 

Mori, S 22 

Nauss, R. W 81 

Newman, G 82 

Mcolls, E. E 19 

Norment, R. B., Jr 12, 62 

Norris, E 26 

Old, L. E 22 

Oldt, F 81 

Padua-Gaerlan, R 81 

Parker, S. L 12, 59, 60 

Passmore, J 22 

Pearl, R 8, 26, 59, 61 

Pedley, F. G 82 

Pirquet, C 38 

Pitlik, S. 15, 19 

Pleasants, J. H 6 

Powell, H. M 19 

Pritchett, I. W 13, 19, 47, 48 

Prommas, C 17 

Randall, B 6 

Randall, W. W 12, 49 

Ransom, B. H 38 

Rector, N. H 24 

Reed, L. J 9, 26, 59, 60 

Reynolds, B. 1) 15, 19 

Rice, E. G 24 

Riegel, M 24 

Riley, C. V 18 

Riley, R. H 17 



Kivas-Yides, B 82 

Bobbins, <'-. E 23 

Robinson, G. H 10, ■><;, 45, 46 

Robleto, F 16, 22 

Root, F. M 11, 51 , 52, 54, 55 

Rose, W 30 

Rosedale, J. L 22 

Rumreich, A. S 15, 18 

Rutherford, C. E 13, 58 

Salter, R. C 13, 45, 46, 47, 82 

Schapiro, L 18 

Schereschewsky, J. W 37 

Schnepfe, C. 1) 24 

Schubert, 16, 22 

Shamburger, A. C 24 

Shaw, E. II., Jr 24 

Shelling, D. H 82 

Shipp, C. M 23 

Simmonds, N 11, 49, 50 

Simon, C. E. .10, 41, 51, 52, 53. 54, 55 

Slanina, O 16, 20 

Smith, B 24 

Smith, H. W 82 

Smith, M. C 24 

Smith, O. C 21 

Snow, W. F 10 

Snyder, J. C 21 

Souza, G. H. de P 81 

Spaeth, R. A 10, 26, 57, 58 

Spielman, C. M 24 

Stoll, N. R 15, 20 

Sweeney, J. S : ... 16, 18 

Swenarton, J. C 20 

Sydenstricker, E 20 

Szvmanski, J. J 81 

Talbott, H 24 

Taliaferro, W. H 11, 51, 52, 55 

Tao, W. S 20 

Taylor, H. A 24 

Thies, E. S 26 

Tiedeman, W. v. D 24 

Ting, G. G 20 

Tonkin, A. B 23 

Totten, E 24 

Urbanek, K 16, 22 

Van Winkle, C. C 18 

Vieira, F. B 81 

Wada, T 24 

Wang, G. H 24 

Welch, W. H 7, 26, 29, 30, 41, 78 

Weston, W 24 

White, M., Jr 6 

Whitmore, E. R 81 

Wild, E. L 24 

Willard, D 6 

Wilson, D. B 24 

Wilson, H. C 13, 57. 59 

Winchester. M 22 

Wolman, A 14, 49 

Wood, F. W 6 

Wroczynski, C 16, 20 

Yang, T. S 24 



INDEX 



PAGE 

Admission, Requirements for 

31, 32, 34, 35, 36 

Advisory Board of the Faculty... 26 

American Journal of Hygiene.... 41 

Applications, Committee on 26 

Artist 26 

ant Director 7, 26, 30 

.mts 13 

Lasociates 10 

Associate Professors 8 

Announcement of Courses, Depart- 
ments of Instruction and, 

Bacteriology 45 

Biometry and Vital Statistics, 59 

Chemical Hygiene 49 

Epidemiology 62 

General Hygiene 39 

Health Officers, Intensive 35 

Immunology 47 

Medical Zoology 51 

Medical Zoology, Intensive. ... 36 

Physiological Hygiene 57 

Public Health Administration, 64 

Sanitary Engineering 49 

Special Students 36 

Bachelor of Science in Hygiene, 

Candidates for degree of... 20 

Course leading to degree of . . 34 

Schedule for course 76 

Bacteriology, Course in 45 

Biometry and Vital Statistics, 

Course in 59 

Board of Trustees 6 

Advisory, of the Faculty 26 

Calendar 5 

Registration and 41 

Candidates for Bachelor of Science 

in Hygiene 20 

Certificate in Public Health.. 20 

Doctor of Public Health 17 

Doctor of Science in Hygiene, 18 
ertificate in Public Health, Course 

leading to 34 

hemical Hygiene, Course in 49 

ollected Papers 41 

"ommittee, Executive 26 

Library 26 

On Applications 26 

On Publications 26 



643] 



Contents 

County Health Unit 31, 

Courses, 

Bachelor of Science in Hy- 
giene 

Certificate in Public Health . . 

Doctor of Public Health 

Doctor of Science in Hygiene, 

General Hygiene 

Intensive for Health Officers. . 

Intensive in Medical Zoology . . 

Schedules of.. 69, 72, 74, 75, 76 

Special Students 

Degrees, Candidates for 

Bachelor of Science in Hy- 
giene 

Doctor of Public Health 

Doctor of Science in Hygiene, 
De Lamar Lectures in Hygiene. . . 
Departments of Instruction and 
Announcement of Courses, 

Bacteriology 

Biometry and Vital Statistics, 

Chemical Hygiene 

Epidemiology 

'General Hygiene 

Health Officers Intensive 

Immunology 

Medical Zoology 

Medical Zoology, Intensive... 

Physiological Hygiene 

Public Health Administration, 

Sanitary Engineering 

Special Students 

Director 6, 30, 40, 41, 

Assistant 7, 26, 

Doctor of Public Health, 

Candidates for degree of . . . . 

Course leading to degree of. . 

Schedule for course 

Doctor of Science in Hygiene, Can- 
didates for degree of 

Course leading to degree of. . 

Epidemiology, Course in 

Executive Committee 

Faculty 

Advisory Board of the 

Fellows 

87 



AGE 
3 



20 

17 

18 

37 



45 

59 

4!) 
62 
39 
35 
47 
51 
36 
57 
64 
49 
36 
4-2 
30 

17 

31 



18 

32 
62 
26 
7 
26 



88 



School of Hygiene and Public Health [ 044 



PAGE 

Fellows, 

By Courtesy 14 

International Health Board... 15 

Rockefeller Foundation 15 

Fellowships 40 

General Statement 29 

Health Officers, Intensive Course for, 35 

Health Unit, County 31, 65 

Hygiene, American Journal of.... 41 

Hygiene, Course in General 39 

Immunology, Course in 47 

Instruction and Announcement of 
Courses, Departments of, 

Bacteriology 45 

Biometry and Vital Statistic s, 59 

Chemical Hygiene 49 

Epidemiology 62 

General Hygiene 39 

Health Officers, Intensive 35 

Immunology 47 

Medical Zoology 51 

Medical Zoology, Intensive. ... 36 

Physiological Hygiene 57 

Public Health Administration, 64 

Sanitary Engineering 49 

Special Students 36 

Instructors 12 

Intensive Course in Medical Zoology 36 
Intensive Course for Public Health 

Officers 35 

International Health Board 31, 65 

International Health Board Fellows, 15 

Lecturers 9 

De Lamar 37 

Lectures, De Lamai 37 

General Hygiene 39 

Library Committee 26 

Librarian 26 

Medical Zoology, Course in 51 

Intensive Course in 36 

Physiological Hygiene, Course in. . 57 

Officers 26 

President of the University .... 6, 7, 26 

Professors 7 

Associate 8 



PAGE 

Public Health, 

Course leading to Certificate in. 34 
Public Health Administraton, 

Course in 64 

Public Health Officers, 

Intensive Course for 35 

Public Lectures 37 

Publications 41 

< lommittee on 26 

Requirements for Admission 

31, 32, 34, 35, 36 

Registration and Calendar 41 

Rockefeller Foundation 29 

Rockefeller Foundation Fellows... 15 

Sanitary Engineering, Course in . . 49 
Schedules of Courses, 

Bachelor of Science in Hy- 
giene 76 

Certificate in Public Health . . 75 

Doctor of Public Health 69 

Intensive Course for Health 

Officers 78 

Scholarships 40 

Secretary 26 

Special Students, Courses for 36 

List of 21 

State Department of Health. Mary- 
land 31. 65 

Statement, General 29 

Statistics, Course in Biometry and 

Vital 59 

Students, 1921-1922 17 

Special 21 

Intensive course 22, 23 

Summary of Students 25 

Treasurer of the University 6 

Trustees, Board of 6 

Tuition 42 

University, President of 7 

Treasurer of 6 

Trustees of 6 

Zoology, Course in Medical 51 

Intensive Course in Medical. . 36 

U. S. Public Health Service. .. .31, 65 



few Series, 1923 Whole Number 344 

No. 3 Wf»BJ4«r 

OF rue 

JOHNS HOPKINS 
UNIVERSITY CIRCULAR 



SCHOOL OF HYGIENE AND 
PUBLIC HEALTH 

CATALOGUE AND ANNOUNCEMENT 
FOR 1923-1924 



Baltimore, Maryland 

Published by the University 

Issued January, March, April, June, July, October, November 



APRIL, 1923 



Entered, October 21, 1903, at Baltimore, Md., as second-class matter, under 
Act of Congress of July 16, 1894 

Acceptance for mailing at special rate of postage provided for in Section 1103, 
Act of October 3, 1917. Authorized on July 3. 1918 



UNIVERSITY OF ILLINOIS-URBANA 




3 0112 111992100 




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